Why Do People Hate Jews? Rabbi Sidesteps Question

nazischoolclass

By Richard Edmondson

Controversy has hit a school near Leipzig, Germany where an entire 9th grade class is reportedly under investigation for openly displaying respect for Adolph Hitler and posting photos of themselves giving Nazi salutes and what-not on social media.

In mainstream media reports on the story, parents and authorities are referred to as being “horrified” over the matter, while some of the social media postings reportedly included jokes about Jews as well as praises of Hitler as a “great man.”

The school in question is called Landsberg Gymnasiums, located in the Leipzig area, and while it appears questionable as to whether all 29 members of the class were involved in the historical revisionism–which has, of course, greatly upset Jews–the investigation by German authorities is said to be, at least as of now, focusing collectively on the group as a whole.

Below is an RT report on the story which includes an interview with a Jewish rabbi from Berlin. Starting at about 2:35, the interviewer poses the following rather pertinent question to the rabbi:

Germany’s far from being the only country with a growing far right sentiment in Europe. Why do you think that this ideology seems to be proving increasingly popular?

What the interviewer is asking is a slight variation on the question, “Why do people hate Jews?” And it’s a darn good question! Unfortunately, it’s one which Jews apparently are determined not to answer. With only a few notable exceptions, which you can just about count on one hand, Jews, when faced with the question of what is causing rising hostility and anti-Semitism, relentlessly evade, duck and eschew offering any kind of lucid, cogent analysis on the subject. And so it is with this fellow:

Let’s break it down. Here again is the question that the interviewer put:

Germany’s far from being the only country with a growing far right sentiment in Europe. Why do you think that this ideology seems to be proving increasingly popular?

And here is the rabbi’s response:

Well I believe that this ideology unfortunately, which you mentioned also in other countries is, is not limited specifically to Germany at all. We find it in a number of countries across the spectrum, even many well-known countries that stand strong for democratic values. However, here in Germany it has a special meaning, there’s a special responsibility. I mean the authorities are doing what they can. That’s clear. But it has to also come onto the level of the population in education, in the very, very young stages of children when the children are still young. Already there the necessity for tolerance and respect for people of other religions and of other backgrounds has to be grounded at the very beginning of their childhood.

Now, you’ll recall that the interviewer did not ask the rabbi for any tips on child raising. What he specifically asked was: “Why do you think that this ideology seems to be proving increasingly popular?” But the rabbi completely sidestepped the question.

If we want to find out the reasons for growing anti-Jewish sentiments around the world, we might consider the following:

1. Israel’s treatment of the Palestinians, including its most recent assault upon Gaza, which left more than 2100 dead

2. Pro-Israel lobbies in numerous countries, lobbies which are perceived as disloyal, which corrupt national leaders, and which work to subvert popular democratic will

3. Jewish-owned media holdings and banking interests which constantly seem to agitate for wars, and who continue to prop up and support the aforementioned corrupted leaders and keep them in office

If you want an explanation for the increasing and openly-manifested hostilities toward Jews that we are now seeing, I would suggest that these are three main areas you might wish to examine and consider as possibilities, though not necessarily in the order I have presented them. And if you want to look for why such sentiments are rising to the surface in Germany specifically, you might consider also the ongoing holocaust reparations that German taxpayers have been forced to pay out, not only to individual Jews but also to the state of Israel.

Many people are perhaps under the impression that, yes, some sort of redress likely did occur between Germany and European Jews, but that whatever it was, it most likely was resolved and settled a few years after the war. Not  so. German reparations have been ongoing for the past 62 years, dating all the way back to the Luxembourg Agreement, and there seems to be almost no end in sight. According to this site, heirs to survivors may now be eligible for payments as well.

The Luxembourg agreement was signed on September 10, 1952 following lengthy negotiations between an ad hoc committee of Jews representing various Jewish organizations, including the World Jewish Congress; officials from the new state of Israel; and representatives of the West German government, including the country’s then-chancellor Konrad Adenauer. Here is an excerpt from Adenauer’s memoirs that readers might find especially interesting:

It was clear to me that, if the negotiations with the Jews failed, the negotiations at the London Debt Conference [which were going on at the same time] would also run aground, because Jewish banking circles would exert an influence upon the course of the London Debt Conference which should not be under-estimated. On the other hand it was self-evident that a failure of the London Debt Conference would bring about a failure of the negotiations with the Jews. If the German economy was to achieve a good credit standing and become strong again, the London Conference would have to be ended successfully. Only then would our economy develop in a way that would make the payments to Israel and the Jewish organizations possible.

An article published in the London Jewish Observer at the time put it more bluntly:

The whole material weight of world Jewry will be mobilized for an economic war against Germany, if Bonn’s offer of reparations remains unsatisfactory.

The Jews who participated in the Luxembourg Conference collectively came to be known as The Conference on Jewish Material Claims Against Germany, or simply The Claims Conference, an organization that still exists today and which, through the years, has been touched by scandals, including one which erupted in 2009 when it was discovered that colossal amounts of money had been paid out in fraudulent claims made by alleged “survivors” of German war crimes.

“Never in the six-decade history of the organization had theft of this scale ever been discovered,” said the JTA in a report published on the scandal in 2012.

The total amount of money stolen or misappropriated was estimated at $57 million. Yet still today the Claims Conference continues to receive, and preside over the distribution of, all reparations paid out not only by Germany but by all other nations that have been forced to expend monies to Jewish survivors as well. These countries include Hungary, Austria, and also Switzerland, where banks have been forced to cough up a reported $1.24 billion in holocaust survivor claims just since the late 1990s.

To what extent the 9th graders at the German school are aware of these issues is unclear. There seems to be a concerted effort to portray the actions of the youngsters not as a revival of Nazism in Germany but as a simple youthful inclination toward exuberance and the breaking of “taboos.” This at any rate is how Lutz Feudel, the school headmaster, is spinning it.

“Breaking taboos is part of young adulthood,” he said. “I don’t believe that they wanted to actively promote neo-Nazi ideology.”

Perhaps not. But there does seem to be currently underway a fairly widespread review, reassessment, and revision as to the history of the Nazis and World War II. One of the most recent articles I have encountered to this effect is by Zen Gardner, who says that rather than the Germans declaring war on the Jews, it was the other way around. And he even pinpoints a date as to when this occurred, March 29, 1933 (which would have been just two months after Hitler was appointed chancellor of Germany, by German President Von Hindenberg, on January 29, 1933), while also supplying a quote from former British Prime Minister David Lloyd George that sounds remarkably, almost eerily, similar to the quote from Adenauer:

The International Bankers swept statesmen, politicians, journalists and jurists all to one side and issued their orders with the imperiousness of absolute Monarchs. They had declared economic and financial war on Germany.

In Gardner’s view it is “undeniable that many Jews and other people suffered terribly at the hands of Nazi Germany,” yet he adds that “the legend of Auschwitz as an extermination camp for Jews is an outright fabrication.” His drawing of this conclusion, he says, is based in part on the work of British author David Irving.

While Irving has of course been extensively vilified by the mainstream media, no one, so far as I’m aware, has successfully discredited or refuted his research, although certainly Wikipedia makes a valiant effort at it here.

But regardless of your take on the Nazis and the German concentration camps, Jews have marshaled the power necessary to make questioning them illegal in a number of countries–and Irving and others have been jailed for nothing more than expressing their views on the matter. Why? For if the historical narrative found in the officially approved textbooks is true, then surely it should be able to withstand scrutiny–in which case, why would it ever be necessary to pass such laws in the first place?

And why does Israel continue its systematic displacement of the Palestinians, its theft of their lands, and its ongoing construction of illegal settlements in violation of international law? Is it possible to build a case that these things, along with the Zionist-controlled media’s one-sided coverage of them, are arousing more and more people to anger? And what also of the pro-Israel lobbies, the Wall Street investors, the power of the Federal Reserve and the central banks in Europe–is it going out on a limb to speculate that anger is aroused here as well, or to deduce that this anger is directed, rightly or wrongly, against Jews collectively as a whole? And finally could all these factors, taken as a whole, account for the rising levels of animus toward Jews we are seeing, the so-called “growing anti-Semitism” that so many Jewish writers ominously expound upon?

Perhaps.

But one thing is certain: a great many Jews, such as the rabbi in Berlin, definitely do not want to talk about it.

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