Saudi Crown Prince Wants to End Yemen War: Leaks

Local Editor

Newly-leaked emails written by two former top US officials show that Saudi crown prince and defense minister Mohammed bin Salman “wants out” of the war he started in Yemen.

 

Mohammed bin Salman


Email correspondence from April of this year between Martin Indyk, the former US ambassador to the Zionist entity and Yousef Otaiba, the UAE’s ambassador to the US, was obtained by Middle East Eye, in which the two discussed their dealings with Prince bin Salman.

Indyk said bin Salman had been “clear” in meetings with himself and former national security advisor Stephen Hadley that he “wants out of Yemen” and is “OK with the US engaging with Iran,” despite his publicly aggressive stance on both the Yemeni crisis and Tehran.

Otaiba, however, did not reply to requests for comment, while Hadley told MEE: “I cannot comment on what was a private conversation.”

The then 29-year-old Mohammed bin Salman attracted criticism internationally for plunging Saudi Arabia into a bloody intervention in Yemen in March 2015.

The Saudi-led bombing campaign and air and sea blockade has left 70 per cent of Yemen’s 27-million strong population reliant on some form of humanitarian aid, 7.3 million on the brink of famine and caused the worst cholera outbreak in modern history.

The idea that Saudi Arabia is trying to exit its expensive war next door is not a new one, however, co-founder of the Sanaa Centre and non-resident fellow at the Middle East Institute in Washington DC told The Independent.

The UN estimates $2.1bn is needed to stop Yemen turning into a completely failed state, but donor governments only pledged half that amount at an aid conference in Geneva in April.

Western governments have also faced criticism for their role in the conflict: arms sold to Saudi Arabia are destined for use in the Yemeni war, rights groups indicate.

Source: The Independent, Edited by website team

15-08-2017 | 09:59
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israel’s part in the Saudi genocide in Yemen ignored by the media

Yemen: Al-Qaeda and Iran – but no Israel

Uncle Sam has been running Israel’s covert proxy war in Yemen for over a decade. Both the US and Israel are supporting Saudi Arabia in its war crimes against Yemeni people for supporting anti-Israel Houthi Zaidi Shi’ites.

Last week Pentagon officials admitted American boots in Yemen disguised as Al-Qaeda fighters.

The Saudi-led war against Houthis who make 50% of country’s population, started two years ago. Later the UAE, and Israel joined the war to bring an anti-Iran regime in Sana’a. However, it has achieved little beyond killing thousands, destroying much of Yemen’s infrastructure, empowering ISIS and its affiliated Al-Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula (AQAP), and pushing millions to the brink of famine.

Washington’s excuse for supporting Saudi war on Yemen is that the Houthis are controlled and armed by Iran. This is a narrative that has been in play for years despite little proof of consistent Iranian support for the Houthis and no proof that the Houthis follow Iranian orders. Most recently, US and international media have cited reports prepared by a UK-registered company called Conflict Armament Research (CAR). Their thin reports offer limited evidence of Iranian arms transfers and rely heavily on sources from within the armed forces of the United Arab Emirates – hardly a disinterested party. CAR’s March 2016 report on purported small-arms shipments from Iran to Yemen included a map that showed the weapons shipments transiting southern Yemen. Yet southern Yemen is controlled by anti-Houthi forces and AQAP, not the Houthis,” wrote Michael Horton, a senior analyst at Washington-based Jamestown Foundation, in April 5, 2017.

The London-based Conflict Armament Research is Zionist advocacy group. It was established in 2011. It mostly reports on arms movements among Islamic groups fighting pro-US governments. Last year, CAR claimed it found Iranian manufactured arms in nine African countries. However, it never reported how many African governments import Israeli weapons. India happens to be Israel’s largest arms buyer.

On February 26, 2016, Santanu Choudhury wrote at the Wall Street Journal: “The London-based Conflict Armament Research, which tracks the supply and use of illegal arms in active conflicts, said it studied the remnants of explosives found in Syria and Iraq and found that most of the detonators, detonating cord, and safety fuses used by ISIS were from Indian companies. The organization said it found evidence of parts from 51 companies from 20 countries including the US, Russia, China, Brazil, Iran, Belgium, Netherlands and Japan.”

On August 1, 2017, paranoid Zionist Jew Jonathan Saul reported at Reuters that he found an Iranian arms route to Houthis.

For the last six months the Islamic Revolutionary Guards Corps (IRGC) has begun using waters further up the Gulf between Kuwait and Iran as it looks for new ways to beat an embargo on arms shipments to fellow Shi’ites in the Houthi movement. Using this new route, Iranian ships transfer equipment to smaller vessels at the top of the Gulf, where they face less scrutiny. The transhipments take place in Kuwaiti waters and in nearby international shipping lanes,” Saul informed his anti-Iran Zionist audience.

On June 19, 2015, the powerful Zionist lobby CFR reported: “The United States collaborated with Yemen on counterterrorism since the USS Cole bombing and 9/11 attacks, but the Saleh regime’s violent crackdown on protestors in 2011 strained the relationship.”

Let’s not forget: Israel was behind both 9/11 and USS Cole.

Why the Saudi War on Yemen Is Seen as US State Terrorism

Why the Saudi War on Yemen Is Seen as US State Terrorism

By Christina Lin,

The US/Saudi war on Yemen is now in its third year, and the indiscriminate Saudi bombing campaign has destroyed much of the country’s infrastructure, left thousands dead and millions starving in a man-made famine, and triggered a cholera epidemic that has infected almost half a million people.

On July 23, the International Committee of the Red Cross warned that more than 600,000 people were expected to contract cholera in Yemen this year.

Most Americans are not aware of their country’s role in this war on the Middle East’s poorest country, but the Yemenis know very well that Washington supplies the weapons and sponsors the Saudi bombing campaign responsible for their suffering. In the capital Sanaa, anti-American graffiti are plastered on walls throughout the city screaming “USA kills Yemeni people,” and they see the war as not just as a Saudi war, but as a US war on their country.

On July 19, the US Public Broadcasting Service program Frontline aired a brief documentary titled “Inside Yemen” to look at the impact of the war on the country. In May, a few days after the PBS crew arrived, there was a large demonstration in Sanaa called “Say No to American Terrorism”. The crew captured powerful images of people condemning US aggression against their country.

According to the documentary, the rally was in response to the arrival of US President Donald Trump in Riyadh, where he announced his intention to approve a US$110 billion arms package for the Saudis to continue their bombing campaign.

Saudi forces have targeted farms, food facilities, water infrastructure, marketplaces, and even the port of Hudaydah, where most of the humanitarian aid had been entering the country, and the Yemenis just want an end to the slaughter and destruction of their country. Nearly 19 million people require assistance, with 7 million facing famine.

The PBS crew noted that although the Yemenis could clearly see they were Americans, there was no hostility, as the population placed the blame not on them but on the US government. One protester explained that he respected America, but the purpose of the rally was “to express our outrage against the United States policy”. Ordinary Yemenis just wanted the world to be aware of what is actually going on in their country.

Their cries have not gone unheeded. Some members of the US Congress have been actively shedding light on their country’s complicity in this humanitarian disaster, spearheaded by Republican Senator Rand Paul, Democratic Senator Chris Murphy, and Ted Lieu, a Democratic congressman from California.

On June 13, the Senate voted on a bipartisan bill to halt a new $510 million arms package to Saudi Arabia, but it was defeated by a narrow margin of 53-47. Despite the loss, the vote reflected an increasing level of Senate opposition to Saudi arms sales, compared with a similar measure in September last year that failed 71-27.

Back in September, while some members of Congress were convinced about their reasons for dissent, it seemed that the senators who approved the arms package were ignorant about what they were rubber-stamping or even knew much about Yemen.

For example, when asked why they voted against blocking the deal, some senators cited concern that the Strait of Hormuz would be threatened if Houthi rebels took over Yemen, apparently confusing Oman with Yemen.  The Strait of Hormuz actually separates Iran and the Omani Peninsula, whereas Yemen is hundreds of kilometers to the southwest and borders the Red Sea and the Gulf of Aden.

Nonetheless, Senator Murphy was encouraged by the increasing dissent this June and noted:

“Today’s vote total would have been unthinkable not long ago, but Congress is finally taking notice that Saudi Arabia is using US munitions to deliberately hit civilian targets inside Yemen.”

Meanwhile, Rand Paul railed against senators “talking about making a buck while 17 million people are threatened with famine”.

Lieu, who since August 2016 has been protesting against US complicity in Saudi war crimes, also recently issued a statement on the House of Representatives’ passage of his amendment to the National Defense Authorization Act for fiscal year 2018. The Lieu amendment requires the Pentagon to report to Congress on whether Riyadh and coalition partners are abiding by their commitments in Yemen, and on July 14 the House finally voted to defund US military support for the Saudi war on Yemen.

However, Yemen continues to collapse under the non-stop Saudi aerial bombardment, with Riyadh blocking access by journalists and humanitarian organizations.

Jamie McGoldrick, the United Nations humanitarian coordinator in Yemen, has warned that because of the lack of media coverage the UN had been unable to raise even 30% of the funding it needs to deal with the crisis.

While the devastation and famine in Yemen have been largely ignored in the US press, the British Broadcasting Corporation on September 22, 2016, published an article and video that provided a small peek into the human misery and suffering, especially of Yemeni children.

Despite this, McGoldrich laments that

“Yemen is very much a silent, forgotten, I would even say a purposefully forgotten emergency.”

Dr. Christina Lin is a Nonresident Fellow at the Center for Transatlantic Relations at SAIS-Johns Hopkins University specializing in China-Middle East/Mediterranean relations, and a research consultant for Jane’s Chemical, Biological, Radiological, and Nuclear Intelligence Centre at IHS Markit.

متغيّرات متسارعة

متغيّرات متسارعة

أغسطس 11, 2017

ناصر قنديل

– خلال أيّام قليلة ورغم ضجيج المعارك والتصريحات النارية تظهر مؤشرات متسارعة على وجود إطار شامل لتهدئة الحروب وحلحلة الأزمات يتخطّى حدودها الكيانية والإقليمية. ففي الأزمة الكورية وبعد يومين من تبادل تصريحات نارية أميركية وكورية شمالية تتحدّث عن ضربات ساحقة، يعلن وزير الدفاع الأميركي عزم واشنطن على التفاوض بواسطة أطراف ثالثة، ومعلوم أنه نتاج تفويض لروسيا والصين للإدارة التفاوضية للأزمة، وتعلن كوريا الجنوبية رغبتها بالتفاوض المباشر مع كوريا الشمالية.

– في الأزمة الخليجية تراجعت المناخات التي تتحدّث عن خطوات حاسمة لدول المقاطعة لقطر بقيادة السعودية، وحلّ مكانها الحديث عن مراجعة تفاوضية للأزمة، وصار الحديث عن الحوار مفردة تتكرّر في التصريحات الدولية والإقليمية المعنية بملفّ الأزمة، بعدما استنفدت فرص الضربات القاضية التي راهنت عليها السعودية منذ أكثر من شهرين، بينما في الحرب على اليمن تدور محادثات المبعوث الأممي على تحديد هوية طرف ثالث مقبول من الفريقين يتولى مرفأ الحديدة ومطار صنعاء كخطوة تمهيدية لفك الحصار البحري والجوي الذي فرضته السعودية على اليمن والذي كان سلاحها الأمضى رهاناً على تركيع اليمنيين، ويجري التداول بقوة دولية أو بقوة عُمانية أو قوة عُمانية كويتية مشتركة لهذا الغرض.

– في سورية يندفع الجيش السوري بقوة عسكرية شرقاً في البادية ونحو دير الزور، لكنه يندفع عسكرياً بمواكبة سياسية في الجنوب على إيقاع التفاهم الروسي الأميركي، بعدما فقدت الجماعات المسلحة التي رفضت التسليم الطوعي للجيش السوري لمناطق سيطرتها، خصوصاً على الحدود مع الأردن، فيحسم الجيش السوري المعابر في محافظة السويداء من دون أن تكون الطائرات الأميركية تتربّص بوحداته، كما جرى على الحدود السورية العراقية، وينهزم المسلحون بعدما تلقوا ضربات قاسية.

 وعلى المستوى السياسي تبدو عملية تركيب وفد للمعارضة بمقاسٍ مناسب لمهمة جنيف المقبلة حتى نهاية العام، عنواناً للحوارات التي تدور تحت عنوان وفد موحّد للمعارضة، بالتوازي مع عملية فك وتركيب وإبعاد وتقاعد وتمارض لقيادات لا مكان لها في المعادلة الجديدة، التي تقوم على تشكيل حكومة سورية تضمّ تمثيلاً للمعارضة في ظلّ الرئاسة السورية والدستور السوري، والتسليم بسقوط مشروع الإسقاط وبأولوية الحرب على الإرهاب.

– في الأزمة الأوكرانية، ورغم كلّ مظاهر الخلاف حول حلها وكيفياته وما ترتب على الأزمة الدبلوماسية الأميركية الروسية مع العقوبات الأميركية على روسيا، وقرار موسكو إبعاد الدبلوماسيين الأميركيين، يعلن وزير الخارجية الروسي سيرغي لافروف أنه بنتيجة لقاءات مانيلا مع نظيره الأميركي ريكس تيلرسون وتأكيد تفاهمات الرئيسين دونالد ترامب وفلاديمير بوتين، فإنّ مسؤولين أميركيين وروساً سيلتقون قريباً للتداول في تنشيط مساعي الحلّ في أوكرانيا.

– هذه التطورات والمتغيّرات المتسارعة تمنح قدراً عالياً من المصداقية لما تسرّب عن تفاهم بين الرئيسين الروسي والأميركي على هامش قمة هامبورغ، على السعي لتنقية المشهد على الساحة الدولية من عناصر التوتر مع نهاية العام، وجعل الصورة الأبرز للسياسة الدولية هي التعاون في الحرب على الإرهاب. وهذا يعني إطفاء النيران التي تشعل الحرائق، أو منع ضخّ الوقود عنها لتنطفئ نارها، وبذلك نشهد تدريجاً فقدان محفزات وموارد الحروب التي لا تستطيع الاستمرار بدونها، ما يؤكد أنها حروب أشعلت واستمرت بقرار خارجي، مهما بدت أسبابها المحلية والداخلية وجيهة، وأن لا حرب تملك أسباب الاستمرار بلا حاضنة دولية بحجم ما تقدّمه واشنطن، أو توحي لحلفائها بتقديمه، أو تغضّ النظر عنهم عند تقديمه، وعندما تقرّر فإنّ من كانوا يكابرون بالأمس ينصاعون اليوم.

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The US Is Complicit in the Destruction of Yemen

Jonah Shepp

The United States has had a dismal track record managing conflicts in the Middle East in recent years, but in Yemen, it is currently abetting a humanitarian disaster that could ultimately rival Syria and Iraq in its destabilizing impact on the region and the world.

War in Yemen


More than 10,000 people have been killed in the intractable war over the past three years…

Over the weekend, international aid agencies warned that some 20 million people were imminently at risk of dying of starvation or poverty-related diseases in Yemen and a number of African countries, all of which are facing critical food shortages.

In Yemen alone, Save the Children counts 20.7 million people, half of them children, in dire need of aid. Meanwhile, a cholera epidemic is raging through the parts of Yemen hit hardest by the war, with at least 360,000 suspected cases and perhaps as many as 425,000. Some 2,000 people have already died in the epidemic, and the number of cases is rising by some 7,000 a day.

The famine in Yemen is not a consequence of drought or crop failure… Rather, the famine is the intentional result of a two-year blockade imposed on the country by Saudi Arabia, with the help of its allies, including the US, in a deliberate effort to starve Yemeni areas into submission. The ruthless siege tactics of the Saudi-led coalition are also directly to blame for the cholera outbreak. Saudi Arabia has targeted civilian areas with its bombs, destroying vital infrastructure like hospitals and water systems. Dr. Homer Venters, director of programs at Physicians for Human Rights, says we are witnessing the “weaponization of disease” in Yemen, as well as in Syria.

The US cannot sidestep its own complicity in this carnage. After belatedly realizing that the Saudis were bombing Yemeni civilians with American-made weapons, the Obama administration blocked sales of cluster bombs and precision munitions to Riyadh last year. The Trump administration, however, sought to resume precision weapons sales back in March, and the Senate signed off on a new $500 million deal by a narrow margin in June. Since March, the administration has been considering expanding US involvement in the Yemen conflict – which the Saudis surely encouraged during Trump’s visit there in May.

Meanwhile, the general US foreign policy is: As long as the Saudis buy their guns and bombs from us, we’re not too concerned about how they end up using them, whether it’s to besiege Yemen, threaten Qatar, brutally suppress protests in Bahrain, or intimidate their own citizens into quiescence. Given Trump’s single-minded obsession with making deals and goosing US manufacturing jobs, as well as his susceptibility to Saudi flattery, his administration is unlikely to stand up to our most troublesome ally anytime soon.

Part of what allows the United States to be an accessory to these atrocities is the fact that though Yemen bleeds, it doesn’t lead. Coverage of Yemen in the Western media, where it exists at all, tends to be one-dimensional “parachute journalism,” produced by non-expert reporters and focusing solely on the Sunni-Shiite war dimension of the conflict.

What really makes the war in Yemen frightening is that the country was already in a fragile state: The poorest country in the Arab region, overpopulated and heavily dependent on imports, the country’s biggest problem is that it is drying up. A population boom and the rise of a cash crop economy has led to overexploitation of scarce resources, exacerbated by the effects of climate change, and Yemen is now one of the most water-stressed countries in the world. Some experts believe Sanaa could become the world’s first capital city to run out of water entirely – not decades from now, but by 2025 – and what little water the city has left is now contaminated with cholera.

If nothing is done to alleviate Yemen’s water crisis, and especially if war continues to degrade infrastructure and make repairs impossible, Yemen is a strong candidate for the world’s first major climate refugee crisis. Between war, famine, disease, climate change, and the indifference of the world, the land known to the Greeks and Romans as “Happy Arabia” is well on its way to becoming ungovernable, if not uninhabitable.

Source: New York Magazine, Edited by website team

09-08-2017 | 15:35

HOUTHIS ATTACK PRO-HADI FORCES IN SANA’A AND AL-JAWF

South Front

Houthis Attack Pro-Hadi Forces In Sana'a and Al-Jawf

Newly recruited Houthi fighters ride on the back of a pick-up truck as they parade before heading to the frontline to fight against government forces, in Sanaa, Yemen January 12, 2017. REUTERS/Khaled Abdullah – RTX2YMO3

Several fighters loyal to the Saudi-backed Mansur Hadi government were killed and wounded in two attacks of -the Houthis in Sana’a and Al-Jawf provinces, according to Yemeni sources.

The Houthis repotedly attacked Al-Safina position southwest of Nahm in Sana’a province and Al-Sallan camp in Al-Maslob in Al-Jawf province. Furthermore, Houthi fighters damaged two vehicles of pro-Hadi forces in Sorouh in Marib, according to the Houthi media wing.

Meanwhile, the Houthi artillery targeted gatherings of Saudi soldiers in Al-Makhroq al-Kabir, Al-Shabaka and Tabbat al-Khashba in Najran at the Yemeni-Saudi border. Yemeni sources also claimed that Houthi snipers killed a Saudi soldier in Slatah in Najran, and another soldier at Qais position in Jizan near the Yemeni-Saudi border.

In another development, the Ministry of Transport and the General Authority for Aviation declared at a news conference that the continued closure of the Sana’a International Airport without any justification is a violation of the international treaties and humanitarian laws.

The Ministry of Transport revealed that 95 thousand patients need to travel abroad for treatment, and also revealed that 13194 Yemenis died due to the inability to transfer them for proper treatment abroad. It’s worth to mention that the Saudi Alliance has imposed a No-Fly zone over the Yemeni capital Sana’a since the start of its military intervention in 2015, although the Yemeni Air Force has been destroyed since the first month of the war.

Houthi forces inflict heavy losses on Gulf-led forces in western Yemen

BEIRUT, LEBANON (8:25 P.M.) – The Houthi forces were relentless on Wednesday, carrying out a large number of attacks against the Gulf-led forces in the Ta’iz Governorate of Yemen.

According to the official media wing of the Houthi forces, their fighters scored several direct hits on the units of the UAE-backed Southern Resistance, killing and wounding many combatants in the process.

The Houthi forces primarily concentrated their attack on the Yakhtal area of Ta’iz, where they share a front-line with the Gulf-backed forces.

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Ansarullah Warns Against Support for Saudi Crimes

Local Editor

As the death toll from the Saudi-led war on the impoverished country increases by the day, the Yemeni Ansarullah movement cautioned the international community against providing a cover for Saudi Arabia’s atrocities in Yemen.

Ansarullah spokesman Mohammad Abdulsalam

Ansarullah spokesman Mohammad Abdulsalam wrote on his Facebook page on Friday that more Saudi crimes would only lead to greater steadfastness on the part of the Yemenis in support of their dignity and the sovereignty of their homeland.

Abdulsalam further called on the Popular Committees and allied army soldiers to step up their operations against the Saudi military and mercenaries.

The remarks came hours after three women and six children from the same family were killed and three others injured in a Saudi-led airstrike on the Mahda district of northwestern Yemeni city of Saada.

Abdel-Ilah al-Azzi, the head of the local health department, said, “We are recording all the crimes of the enemy and we will not forget them. All the criminals will be put on trial soon, God willing.”

The deadly air raid took place at dawn on Friday while the family was asleep.

Saudi Arabia has been leading a brutal military campaign against Yemen for more than two years to reinstall a Riyadh-friendly former president. The Saudi military campaign, however, has failed to achieve its goal.

The protracted war had already martyred over 12,000 Yemenis, with the US and the UK providing the bulk of weapons used by Saudi forces and giving coordinates for the airstrikes, which have killed many civilians.

The Saudi-led offensive has also taken a heavy toll on Yemen’s infrastructure and led to a humanitarian crisis and a cholera epidemic.

The number of suspected cholera cases in Yemen has exceeded 419,800 while almost 2,000 people have died since the outbreak of the epidemic in April, according to the latest figures provided by the World Health Organization [WHO].

Source: News Agencies, Edited by website team

05-08-2017 | 13:31

In pictures: Saudi Army offensive takes disastrous turn in northern Yemen

DAMASCUS, SYRIA (9:20 P.M.) – On Sunday, the Saudi Arabian Army and aligned forces began attacking Houthi-held positions around the Anbarah Mountain in Al-Jouf province after which heavy clashes broke out between the warring parties.

With clashes raging on throughout the day, the Houthi-led Popular Committees finally managed to repel the assault, leaving many dead Saudi troops dead in the wake of the brief offensive.

Houthi soldier also captured ammunition and light weaponry following the failed attack which the Sanaa-based government claimed to be a carefully planned ambush.

Anbarah Mountain overlooks much of Saudi border and is regularly used as a launching pad to strike behind enemy lines in Saudi Arabia. As such, the hill top is frequently attacked although it remains under Yemeni control for now.
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One million Yemeni children risk dying from Cholera amid Saudi aggression, blockade

One million Yemeni children risk dying from Cholera amid Saudi aggression, blockade

Over one million Yemeni children are at risk of dying from cholera due to a Saudi-led aggression and blockade against the impoverished Arab state.

According to Save the Children charity group, since the outbreak began three months ago, there have been 1,900 deaths and 440,000 cases – a number that exceeds the global record of more than 340,000 cases in Haiti for the whole of 2011.

The cholera infection rate is rising due to the advent of the rainy season. Oxfam predicts the the number of victims could reach 600,000 while the World Health Organisation says cholera cases have spread to 21 of the country’s 23 provinces.

In a report, Save the Children said: “Malnourished children have substantially reduced immune systems and are at least three times more likely to die if they contract cholera.”

The disease, spread by sewage contaminated water, causes severe diarrhea, vomiting and dehydration, which can be treated if victims are quickly rehydrated orally and intravenously.

Saudi bombardments destroyed Yemen’s health system

During the 28 months of the Saudi Arabia-led bombing aggression against Yemen, most of Yemen’s health system has been destroyed, and Save the Children said that “health workers have not been paid for nearly a year”.

Oxfam insists urgent measures must be taken to counter and treat the disease. “We need a massive, well-coordinated effort to get clean water, decent sanitation and simple things like soap to people to keep them safe from disease. We need . . . entry of supplies and people so we can get on with the job.”

Saudi regime blocks aid delivery

However, the Saudi-imposed blockade is obstructing deliveries of food and medical supplies through Yemen’s ports and preventing supplies from reaching the capital Sanaa, where the medical emergency is critical.

Auke Lootsma, UN development program country director, said: “We have difficulties obtaining permission from the coalition and the government of Yemen to transport jet fuel to Sanaa to facilitate these flights.”

UN children’s agency (UNICEF) director Anthony Lake said: “In the areas where we are working effectively, both the number of [cholera] cases and the fatality rate are going down. So it’s a race between us and the rains and the continuing destruction and the fighting.”

27 Million Yemenis need urgent aid

Raging cholera is only one aspect of the disaster, according to UN figures. Two-thirds of the 27.6 million Yemenis require emergency aid; 4.5 million children and pregnant and lactating women are malnourished; 14 million have no healthcare.

A Saudi-led coalition started an illegal aggression on Yemen in March 2015 to oust the popular Ansarullah movement and restore to power fugitive Abdul Rabbuh Mansour Hadi who resigned as president and fled to Riyadh. The Saudis have failed to achieve their stated objective and are now stuck in the Yemen quagmire while indiscriminately bombarding the impoverished stated on an almost daily basis.

The Saudi war on Yemen, one of the world’s most impoverished countries, has killed nearly 14,000 people and left tens of thousands wounded while displacing millions.

According to the International Committee of the Red Cross, more than three million people have fled their homes since the onset of the conflict, and more than 20 million throughout the country are in need of humanitarian assistance.

The Saudi-led coalition has imposed a sea and air blockade in many areas controlled by Ansarullah movement including the capital Sanaa, allowing in only limited UN-supervised deliveries of basic goods.

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