UNICEF: 1.4 Million Children Could Die from Famine in Africa, Yemen

Yemeni child

Local Editor

Nearly 1.4 million children are at imminent risk of death from hunger in Nigeria, Somalia, South Sudan and Yemen, the UN children’s agency warned.

Yemeni child

In Yemen, with war tearing the country apart for two years, some 462,000 children are suffering from severe acute malnutrition, UNICEF said.

The Saudi-led strikes on Yemen don’t make the situation any better: in January, the UN warned that over 7,000 people had died in the attacks and about two-thirds of the population is in need of humanitarian aid.

At the same time, 450,000 children are malnourished in northeast Nigeria, and the famine early warning group Fews Net expressed concern that some remote areas of the Nigerian state of Borno are already in famine.

Fews Net also warned that should the disaster go on, aid agencies wouldn’t be able to get to the remote area.

In Somalia, the drought saw 185,000 children malnourished, and these numbers look set to skyrocket to 270,000 over the next few months, according to UNICEF.

Some 270,000 children are currently malnourished in South Sudan and a famine has just been declared in the north of the country.

UNICEF urged the world for prompt response, with Executive Director Anthony Lake saying “we can still save many lives.”

“Time is running out for more than a million children,” Lake added. “The severe malnutrition and looming famine are largely man-made. Our common humanity demands faster action. We must not repeat the tragedy of the 2011 famine in the Horn of Africa.”

Source: News Agencies, Edited by Website Team

22-02-2017 | 09:22

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Famine ‘threatens hundreds of thousands’ in Somalia

Famine ‘threatens hundreds of thousands’ in Somalia

Nicholas Kay, the former special representative and head of the United Nations Assistance Mission in Somalia
Nicholas Kay, the former special representative and head of the United Nations Assistance Mission in Somalia

The United Nations (UN)’s former special representative for Somalia has warned of the looming threat of famine in the Horn of Africa country, calling for immediate action to stop a potential humanitarian disaster.

British diplomat Nicholas Kay, who until recently served as the UN’s envoy for Somalia, said on Wednesday that hundreds of thousands of people in Somalia might die or be on the verge of dying in May this year if immediate action was not taken to address the threat of famine in the African country.

Speaking at a briefing of a group of journalists, Kay warned that in order to prevent the humanitarian disaster “action is needed immediately.”

He said a conference was scheduled in London for May to address the dire situation in Somalia but warned that it might be too late to discuss action then.

“If by the time the conference in May happens we are [still] having to sound the alarm and discuss the famine issue, that is going to be too late,” he said. “There may be hundreds of thousands of people dead or about to die.”

According to the UN humanitarian office, five million people are in need of humanitarian assistance in Somalia.

The UN’s humanitarian appeal for Somalia for 2017 is 864 million dollars. The money is needed to provide assistance to 3.9 million people, but additional funds are required to cope with the worsening situation, and last month, the UN World Food Program launched a 26-million-dollar plan to respond to the drought there.


This image shows a woman and her child walking by a flock of dead goats near Dhahar in Puntland, Somalia, on December 15, 2016. (By AFP)

“Nearly three million people in Somalia face crisis and emergency acute food insecurity,” the Famine Early Warning Systems Network warned earlier this month.

Globally, the famine network said, the need for emergency food assistance is “unprecedented” — with famine also possible in South Sudan and Yemen and likely in inaccessible areas of Nigeria’s northeast.

Yemen has been under Saudi military attacks since March 2015, and Nigeria has been beleaguered by militancy.

Under Trump the USA/Saudi genocide in Yemen continues unabated

Six women killed in Saudi airstrike targeting funeral in Sana’a

Press TV – February 15, 2017
People walk amid the rubble of a house destroyed by a Saudi airstrike on the outskirts of Sana'a, Yemen, February 2, 2017. (Photo by AP)
People walk amid the rubble of a house destroyed by a Saudi airstrike on the outskirts of Sana’a, Yemen, February 2, 2017. (Photo by AP)

At least six women have been killed in a Saudi airstrike targeting a funeral in the Yemeni capital, Sana’a.

According to a preliminary count, 10 people were also injured in the strike on Arhab district on Wednesday, Yemen’s al-Masirah television reported.

It is not the first time Saudi Arabia hits funerals in Yemen.

In October 2016, a similar strike in Sana’a left more than 140 people dead and over 520 wounded.

The first strike on October 8 hit the hall of the funeral that was packed with hundreds of adults and children. The second came three to eight minutes later when medical personnel were trying to help casualties from the first attack.

People carry the coffin of a man who was killed in Saudi airstrikes in the Old City of Sana’a, Yemen, January 28, 2017. (Photo by AP)

Doctors Without Borders, also known by its French acronym as MSF, has said the Saudi war on Yemen has left about 200,000 people facing shortages of food, water and medicine in the city of Ta’izz.

The head of MSF’s Yemen mission, Djoen Besselink, said in a press conference in Jordan on Wednesday that attacks on hospitals, ambulances and medical staff had severely limited the MSF activities in the city, which he visited in January.

He added that he saw unprecedented levels of destruction at the four MSF-supported hospitals in Ta’izz, adding, “There’s not a single room without bullet holes, the windows are gone, there’s no more equipment. It’s total failure.”

Saudi Arabia has been engaged in a deadly campaign against Yemen since March 2015. Riyadh’s aggression, which has killed more than 10,000, was launched in an attempt to restore power to Abd Rabbuh Mansur Hadi, a staunch ally of Riyadh, who has resigned as Yemen’s president but seeks to force his way back into power. The campaign also seeks to undermine the Houthi Ansarullah movement

More Mass Insanity: CIA Issues Award to Saudi Prince

Posted on February 12, 2017

ciasaudi

CIA Director Mike Pompeo issues an award to a Saudi prince as a starving Yemeni clings to life

CIA Director Mike Pompeo, on a visit to Saudi Arabia, presented Saudi Prince Mohammed  bin-Nayef al-Saud on Friday with an award recognizing him for his “counter terrorism” efforts. This comes as Saudi Arabia continues to bomb civilians in Yemen in a war that has brought about famine and starvation.

The story has been reported by RT, Press TV, Al-Arabiya, Aljazeera, and others, but there doesn’t seem to be anything in the US mainstream media about it. We might ask ourselves why. Pompeo was appointed by President Trump to head the CIA, and his presentation of such an award to an official of a country widely recognized as one of the biggest state sponsors of terrorism certainly presents the media with plenty of ammunition with which to attack the president.

And certainly–also–the media are waging an all-out war against Trump on a level unprecedented to anything we’ve ever seen before, with hardly a day going by in which we don’t see attacks against the administration over some of the silliest things imaginable, such as the recent ruckus over the Ivanka Trump clothing line.

But for some reason the US media seem to have passed on attacking the president over this.

The award given to bin-Nayef by Pompeo is described by the foreign media outlets that have published the story as the “George Tenet award.” George Tenet was head of the CIA at the time of 9/11. He and the CIA were widely criticized at the time for their “intelligence failures,” and for not having prevented the attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon, and apparently Tenet lied to the September 11 Commission. Yet in 2004, former President George W. Bush awarded Tenet with the Presidential Medal of Freedom, claiming that the then-CIA Director “was one of the first to recognize and address the growing threat to America from radical terrorist networks.”

But of course many people these days are of the opinion that the most farfetched and unlikely “conspiracy theory” of all concerning 9/11 is the one conjured up in the official 9/11 Commission Report, and as one analyst has put it:

Discounting the Official Narrative as the absurdity it so clearly is, there are just two organisations on the entire planet with the expertise, assets, access and political protection necessary to have both executed 9/11 and effected its cover-up to date (ie the means). Both are Intelligence Agencies – the CIA and the Israeli Mossadwhose motives were arguably the most compelling. Those motives dovetailed perfectly with the Neocon PNAC agenda, with it’s explicitly stated need for “…a catastrophic and catalyzing event – like a new Pearl Harbor”[1]in order to mobilise US public opinion for already planned wars, the effects of which would be to destroy Israel’s enemies.

Over the past year or so a great deal has been reported on the “redacted 28 pages” of a congressional report implicating Saudi Arabia–but not Israel–in the 9/11 attacks, and 9/11 families have filed a lawsuit against the kingdom. So maybe all of this has something to do with why the US media are holding their fire on the Pompeo venture in Saudi Arabia.

One thing that cannot be denied is that the Saudi war on Yemen, which is supported by the US, is causing suffering on a massive scale. This has even been reported by the UN.

“An astounding 10.3 million Yemenis … require immediate assistance to save or sustain their lives [and] at least two million people need emergency food assistance to survive,” said Stephen O’Brien, the UN’s undersecretary general for humanitarian affairs, in January.

In August of last year, charges were made by human rights organizations that the food shortages in Yemen were caused by a blockade imposed by the Saudi coalition, and that this “may amount to the war crime of starvation of civilians as a method of warfare,” as one of them put it. The Saudis have spurned the characterization.

Whatever the case may be, America is more closely resembling a lunatic nation with each passing day. We have a media war being waged upon an elected president, a CIA director bestowing awards upon a Saudi prince, an open conflict between the Trump administration and the judiciary, on-air personalities like Bill O’Reilly branding Vladimir Putin “a killer”, millennial protestors breaking windows and starting fires while police look on and do nothing, Congress members who say Israeli settlements aren’t an obstacle to peace, and virtually everyone, whether white or black or Hispanic or Asian, accusing virtually everyone else of racism.

The winds of mass insanity are now the prevailing winds in America.

***

CIA Awards Saudi Prince for Anti-Terror Efforts

RT

Crown Prince Mohammed bin Nayef, Saudi Arabia’s deputy premier and interior minister, has been presented with a CIA award for his work fighting terrorism, prompting raised eyebrows on social media.
CIA Director Mike Pompeo gifted the prince with the George Tenet award in Riyadh on Friday.

Named for the former Director of Central Intelligence under Bill Clinton and George W Bush, the George Tenet award recognized the Saudi royal’s intelligence work against terrorism and his contributions to peace and security.

Continued here

Trump to Follow Up Yemen Raid by Helping Saudis Target Civilians

Trump to Follow Up Yemen Raid by Helping Saudis Target Civilians

Donald Trump’s first concrete decision as commander in chief was a major fiasco that killed nine children, eight women, and a U.S. soldier in a botched raid on al Qaeda in Yemen.

The operation — which Trump reportedly approved over dinner — also failed to catch its reported target and severely damaged a local clinic, mosque, and school.

It’s hard to imagine Donald Trump making the situation worse in Yemen, but he did.

Impoverished to begin with, Yemen is two years into a civil war that has killed 10,000 people and displaced millions. A U.S.-supplied bombing campaign has turned schools, hospitals, essential infrastructure, and ancient heritage sites into rubble. And a U.S.-backed blockade is preventing the trade of food and basic goods, starving a country that previously relied on imports for 90 percent of its food.

Armed Yemenis walk on the debris at a wedding hall which was reportedly hit by a Saudi-led coalition air strike in the capital Sanaa, on July 10, 2015, a few hours before a humanitarian pause was to take effect. The humanitarian pause in the war in Yemen will be

Armed Yemenis walk on the debris at a wedding hall reportedly hit by a Saudi-led coalition air strike in the capital Sanaa on July 10, 2015.

Photo: Mohammed Huwais/AFP/Getty Images

As a result, the United Nations this week declared that Yemen is on the brink of famine. Officials held a news conference Wednesday to announce that 19 million Yemenis — more than two-thirds of the country’s population — need some form of humanitarian assistance, 7.3 million people do not know where their next meal will come, and more than half of the country’s medical facilities have closed.

Jan Egeland, a former UN official and chair of the Norwegian Refugee Council, described the situation by saying “if bombs don’t kill you, a slow and painful death by starvation is now an increasing threat.”

Even so, the toll of Trump’s botched raid was so high that it drew criticism from the ousted government-in-exile of Abd Rabbu Mansour Hadi — the party supported by the U.S. and Saudi Arabia in Yemen’s civil war. The New York Times reported Tuesday that Hadi’s ministers had withdrawn their support for the U.S. to conduct ground missions in Yemen. The Pentagon and the Hadi government quickly denied the report, but Hadi’s foreign minister then said the government is conducting a “reassessment” of the raid.

Trump is evidently so sensitive to the criticism that he has tried to smother it by shamefully smearing critics and trying to stifle dissent.

White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer accused critics of being disrespectful of Chief Special Warfare Operator William “Ryan” Owens, the Navy SEAL Trump sent to his death. “I think anybody who undermines the success of that raid owes an apology and does a disservice to the life of Chief Owens,” Spicer said.

On Thursday, after Sen. John McCain, R.-Ariz., described the raid as “a failure,” Trump — who repeatedly insisted it was a success — lashed out on Twitter, saying McCain’s criticism “emboldens the enemy” — likening congressional truth-telling to sedition.

And signs are that Yemen is in for more suffering at Trump’s hands. Trump’s Defense Department is reportedly considering a proposal to designate Yemen a formal battlefield in the war on terror, which would allow for an “intensified pace of operations, rather than one-off raids or drone strikes.”

Yemen is one of seven countries included in Trump’s immigration ban. In New York City, Yemeni-Americans have led strikes and large protests against the ban, which separates many from their extended families.

And the Washington Times reported on Wednesday that the administration is set to approve an arms transfer to Saudi Arabia that the Obama administration denied to them on human rights grounds.

The shipment contains hundreds of millions of dollars worth of weapons guidance systems that would allow Saudi Arabia to convert dumb bombs into precision missiles.

Saudi soldiers from an artillery unit stand behind a pile of ammunition at a position close to the Saudi-Yemeni border, in southwestern Saudi Arabia, on April 13, 2015. Saudi Arabia is leading a coalition of several Arab countries which since March 26 has carried out air strikes against the Shiite Huthis rebels, who overran the capital Sanaa in September and have expanded to other parts of Yemen. AFP PHOTO / FAYEZ NURELDINE        (Photo credit should read FAYEZ NURELDINE/AFP/Getty Images)

Saudi soldiers from an artillery unit stand behind a pile of ammunition at a position close to the Saudi-Yemeni border, in southwestern Saudi Arabia, on April 13, 2015.

Photo: Fayez Nureldine/AFP/Getty Images

Targeted bombing is normally safer for civilians than indiscriminate bombing. In fact, Secretary of State Rex Tillerson said during his confirmation hearing that the U.S. should provide Saudi Arabia with “better targeting intelligence” and “better targeting capability” in order to minimize “collateral damage.”

But the Obama administration, despite its reluctance to offend the Saudis, halted the guidance-systems sales after concluding that the Saudi-led coalition was targeting civilians deliberately.

Saudi Arabia began bombing Yemen in March 2015 after Houthi rebels overran the capital and deposed Hadi, the Saudi-backed leader, who now splits his time between the Saudi capital and southern Yemen.  The U.S. has been a silent partner in the kingdom’s campaign against the Houthis, refueling warplanes, supplying targeting intelligence, and resupplying the coalition with more than $20 billion in weapons.

Since the beginning of their campaign, Saudi Arabia has destroyed vital civilian infrastructure including farms, fisheries, water infrastructure, roads, and hospitals. Other targeting decisions have sparked global outrage: the bombing of a children’s school and a school for the blind, and the October attack that turned a funeral at a community center into a “lake of blood.”

Congress has not yet been notified of the weapons shipment, and the Pentagon declined to comment on it.

The Saudi-led bombing campaign has also allowed al Qaeda’s Yemen affiliate — the target of Trump’s botched raid — to grow exponentially in personnel and finances. According to State Department reports, the group quadrupled in size the year that Saudi Arabia started bombing. The same year, al Qaeda seized a prominent port city, which netted them an estimated $5 million a day off customs tariffs and smuggled goods. Al Qaeda in Yemen is also fighting the Houthis.

While Trump ramps up U.S. militarism in Yemen, Democrats have largely ignored the plight of the Yemenis. When a Yemeni refugee who had lost her father to Saudi bombing questioned Nancy Pelosi at a CNN town hall on January 31, Pelosi condemned Trump’s Muslim travel ban — but said nothing about U.S. support for Saudi Arabia’s war. “Your family is suffering because our president is reckless” she said.

Top Photo: A Yemeni man walks past flames rising from the ruins of buildings destroyed in a Saudi-led airstrike on Feb. 10, 2016 in Sanaa

Sayyed Houthi Says Saudis Attacked Yemen to Prove Servitude to US Masters

February 10, 2017

Sayyed Houthi

The leader of Yemen’s Houthi Ansarullah movement, Sayyed Abdul-Malik Badreddin al-Houthi, says Al Saud launched the ongoing atrocious and devastating aerial bombardment campaign against its southern neighbor in order to assert its servitude to the United States.

Addressing a group of Yemenis in the capital, Sana’a, on Friday, Houthi stressed the need for popular mobilization in the face of Saudi Arabia’s acts of aggression, and warned against any capitulation and surrender to enemies, Arabic-language al-Masirah television network reported.

He described the Yemeni nation’s resistance against the Riyadh regime’s incessant attacks as deeply rooted in religious orders and meant to safeguard national sovereignty, esteem and freedom.

The Ansarullah leader said Saudi Arabia opted to take part in hostilities against the impoverished country of Yemen following the death of King Abdullah bin Abdulaziz Al Saud to prove its dependence on US statesmen.

Sayyed Houthi said Washington has offered the Al Saud regime generous diplomatic support for its aggression against Yemen, and is even closely monitoring the attacks.

He called on Yemenis from all walks of life to resist against the relentless Saudi aggression irrespective of economic woes, airstrikes and destruction of critical infrastructure.

The remarks came on the same day that four women lost their lives and several other civilians sustained injuries when Saudi fighter jets carried out two aerial attacks against a residential building in the Yakhtal area of the Red Sea port city of Mokha, situated 346 kilometers south of Sana’a.

Saudi warplanes also struck the mountainous Jabal Yam area in the Nihm district of Yemen’s western-central province of Sana’a, though no report of casualties was immediately available.

Additionally, Saudi jets launched two airstrikes against the Khalid military base in the Mawza district of the southwestern Yemeni province of Taiz, but no fatalities were reported.

According to the United Nations humanitarian coordinator for Yemen, Jamie McGoldrick, the Yemeni conflict has claimed the lives of 10,000 people and left 40,000 others wounded.

McGoldrick told reporters in Sana’a on January 16 that the figure is based on lists of victims gathered by health facilities and the actual number might be higher.

The Saudi war on Yemen, which local sources say has killed at least 11,400 people, was launched in an unsuccessful attempt to bring back the former government to power.

The Saudi war has also taken a heavy toll on the country’s facilities and infrastructure, destroying many hospitals, schools and factories, Press TV reported.

Source: Websites

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Saudi – Iranian Dialogue الحوار السعودي الإيراني

Saudi – Iranian Dialogue

Written by Nasser Kandil,

Neither Iran charged Kuwait with the mediation in the Yemeni crisis, nor did the Iranians attend the side scenes of the negotiations, but the Saudi officers did. Iran did not negotiate in Muscat or elsewhere with delegations that represent the government of Mansour Hadi, but the Saudis negotiated with Al Houthis there. The Americans did the same in charging Kuwait with the mediation and in the negotiation with Al Houthis away from any mediation. Neither Iran sent its Foreign Minister to Kuwait with a message to the Gulf Cooperation Council for a call to open Iranian Gulf dialogue, but the opposite has happened, nor it provided the cover for the Prime Minister Saad Al-Hariri to take the initiative of adopting the nomination of the General Michael Aoun for presidency, but Saudi Arabia did as was said by the Lebanese Interior Minister Nuhad Al-Mashnouk through his talk about a major international regional settlement that paved the way for the arrival of the General Aoun to presidency. Furthermore the joining of Jordan to Astana was not due to Iranian encouragement, knowing that Iran is one of the sponsors of Astana, but surely Jordan has not taken this step without US Saudi encouragement, and the factions which it pledged to join them to ceasing-fire and the fight against Al Nusra and ISIS are factions that led by Washington and funded by Riyadh.

Tehran is aware that Saudi Arabia which is waging the choice of escalation in Bahrain and Yemen and waiting the improvement of its situation there, before entering into negotiation with Iran needs this negotiation as an interest and for its presence, while Iran wants this negotiation in order to keep the region away from further attrition, destruction, extremism, sects, and risks. Tehran is aware that Riyadh has decided in all the issues which form titles of dispute to follow the choice of the negotiation, but it preferred to stay behind the side scenes, so it chose the Prime Minister Al-Hariri in Lebanon, Jordan in Syria and Kuwait in the Gulf. But Tehran is aware that the time of the direct negotiation has not come yet. Saudi Arabia is waiting till summer to know what will the new US President do in the round of the escalation against Iran and to know whether it is mere a talk in the media or it is a sign of confrontation that can be based on. During this time it will do its best to resolve what can be resolved in Yemen and Bahrain and to improve the conditions of the negotiation hoping to avoid the loss in them, just for that Tehran is aware of the inevitability of the maturity of the choice of negotiation as far as it is aware that it has not matured yet.

The Iranian response by the Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif is through the warm welcoming, but the caution concerning the Kuwaiti call for Iranian Gulf dialogue that stems from this assessment, he indicated that “till our neighbors are convinced that we are in need of common cooperation ,with reference to history and geography and the multi common issues between our people and the common threats which we face, then the region will have a real partner such as Iran”.

He stressed that “Iran does not want to threaten the stability of the region, and that the danger in any country threatens the whole region” he hoped that” the message which was sent by the Prince of Kuwait Al Sheikh Sabah Al Ahamad Al-Sabah to Tehran on behalf of himself and the rest of the rulers of the Gulf Cooperation Council came from a true desire”. Showing that “ this desire will be met by a real interaction by Iran also”. He pointed out that “this will be according to the facts and the future vision, provided that, if everyone recognizes that we must go ahead toward different future”.

Waiting for the Saudi summer to see the Iranian reaction.

Translated by Lina Shehadeh,

الحوار السعودي الإيراني

فبراير 8, 2017

ناصر قنديل

– لم تكلّف إيران الكويت بالوساطة في الأزمة اليمنية، ولا حضر الضباط الإيرانيون كواليس المفاوضات، بل الضباط السعوديون هم الذين فعلوا، ولم تفاوض إيران في مسقط ولا في سواها وفوداً تمثّل حكومة منصور هادي، بل السعوديون هم الذين فاوضوا الحوثيين هناك، والأميركيون فعلوا مثلهم في تفويض الكويت بالوساطة وفي التفاوض مع الحوثيين بعيداً عن أي واسطة، وليست إيران مَن أوفدت وزير خارجيتها إلى الكويت حاملاً رسالة لمجلس التعاون الخليجي للدعوة لفتح حوار إيراني خليجي، بل العكس هو الذي حصل، ولا إيران وفرت التغطية لرئيس الحكومة اللبناني سعد الحريري للمبادرة نحو العماد ميشال عون وتبنّي ترشيحه لرئاسة الجمهورية، بل السعودية هي مَن فعل، كما يقول وزير الداخلية اللبنانية نهاد المشنوق بحديثه عن تسوية إقليمية دولية كبرى جاءت بالعماد عون رئيساً، ولا ذهاب الأردن إلى أستانة جاء بنتيجة تشجيع إيراني، وإيران أحد الرعاة في أستانة، بل الأكيد أن الأردن ما كان ليفعل بلا تشجيع سعودي أميركي، والفصائل التي تعهّد ضمها لأستانة في وقف النار والقتال ضد النصرة وداعش، فصائل تقودها واشنطن وتمولها الرياض.

– تدرك طهران جيداً أن السعودية التي تخوض خيار التصعيد في البحرين واليمن، وتنتظر تحسين وضعها فيهما، قبل الدخول في التفاوض مع إيران، تحتاج هذا التفاوض مصلحياً ووجودياً، بينما تريده إيران لتجنيب المنطقة المزيد من الاستنزاف والخراب والتطرف والفتن والمخاطر، وتدرك طهران أن الرياض قرّرت في كل الملفات التي تشكل عناوين الخلاف سلوك خيار التفاوض، لكنها آثرت البقاء خلف الكواليس فاختارت الرئيس الحريري في لبنان، والأردن في سورية، والكويت في الخليج، لكن طهران تدرك أن وقت التفاوض المباشر لم يحِن بعد، فالسعودية تنتظر حتى الصيف لمعرفة ما سيفعله الرئيس الأميركي الجديد في جولة التصعيد بوجه إيران واكتشاف ما إذا كانت مجرد زوبعة كلام في فنجان الإعلام، أم أنها علامة خيار مواجهة يمكن البناء عليه. وخلال هذا الوقت ترمي بثقلها لحسم ما يمكن حسمه في اليمن والبحرين، وتحسين شروط التفاوض أملاً بتجنب الخسارة فيهما، لذلك تدرك طهران حتمية نضج خيار التفاوض بقدر ما تدرك أنه لم ينضج بعد.

– الجواب الإيراني على لسان وزير الخارجية محمد جواد ظريف بالترحيب الحار، لكن الحذر بالدعوة الكويتية لحوار خليجي إيراني ينطلق من هذا التقدير، مشيراً إلى أنه «عندما يقتنع جيراننا أننا بحاجة للتعاون المشترك، بالنظر إلى التاريخ والجغرافيا والمشتركات العديدة بين شعوبنا، والتهديدات المشتركة التي نواجهها، ستحظى المنطقة بشريك حقيقي مثل إيران». وشدّد على أن «إيران لا ترغب بتهديد استقرار المنطقة وإن الخطر في أي بلد يهدّد المنطقة بأكملها»، معرباً عن أمله في «أن تشكل الرسالة التي بعث بها أمير الكويت الشيخ صباح الأحمد الصباح إلى طهران، أصالة عن نفسه ونيابة عن باقي حكام دول مجلس التعاون الخليجي، رغبة حقيقية»، مبيّناً أن «هذه الرغبة ستقابل بتفاعل حقيقي أيضاً من قبل إيران». وأشار إلى أن «ذلك سيكون وفقاً للحقائق وبنظرة مستقبلية»، شريطة أن «يُقرّ الجميع بأننا يجب أن نمضي نحو مستقبل مختلف».

– بانتظار الصيف السعودي لكل حادث حديث إيراني.

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