Germany’s Heckler and Koch to Stop Selling Guns to Saudi Arabia and israel, Calls Them Corrupt Countries

Germany’s Heckler and Koch to Stop Selling Guns to Saudi Arabia and Israel, Calls Them Corrupt Countries

Heckler Koch 78935

The company announced its new policy in its most recent annual report, stating that it will now only sell to “green countries” and those that met Transparency International’s corruption perceptions index as well as the Economist Intelligence Unit’s democracy index.

The bans list also includes Egypt, the United Arab Emirates, Turkey, Malaysia, Indonesia or any African countries.

Both Israel and Saudi Arabia have a history of breaching the territorial integrity of different countries and massacre of innocent civilians.

Veteran anti-arms-trade campaigner Jurgen Grasslin told Radio Sputnik that “Heckler & Koch has been exporting arms since 1955 to nearly every crisis or war area worldwide. Nearly 2 million people are killed and more than 5 million injured by H&K weapons around the world, and one person gets killed by Heckler & Koch bullet every 13 minutes.”

When asked by Sputnik about the possible reasons for the company’s surprise decision, he said that the company has been under strong pressure from the peace movement in Germany and that its image has been “so terrible” that it finally decided to stop selling arms to problem countries

Grasslin also told The Guardian that Heckler & Koch “is a company that had one of the most terrible reputations – in all the podium discussions I’ve done in the last few years, the other arms companies used to say, ‘We’re not like Heckler & Koch, we’re morally better.’”

In its latest acts of aggression, Tel Aviv has waged three wars on the Gaza Strip since 2008, including one in 2014, which left more than 2,200 Palestinians dead.

Last week, the European Parliament adopted a resolution urging EU Member States to improve the implementation of the EU Common Position on Arms Export. The resolution calls for more transparency, a supervisory body and a sanctions mechanism for those Member States not following minimum requirements. It re-iterates the urgent need to impose an arms embargo on Saudi Arabia, European Centre for Democracy and Human Rights reported.

Saudi Arabia has been engaged in a bloody war in Yemen, which has killed more than 12,000 deaths since March 2015. Much of Yemen’s infrastructure, including hospitals, schools and factories, has been reduced to rubble due to the war.

Nearly 3.3 million Yemeni people, including 2.1 million children, are currently suffering from acute malnutrition. The Al-Saud aggression has also taken a heavy toll on the country’s facilities and infrastructure, destroying many hospitals, schools, and factories.

*(Image credit: Joe Hsu/ flickr)

Advertisements

US-made Bomb Killed Civilians in Yemen Residential Building, Says Amnesty

September 22, 2017

Yemen strike

A bomb that destroyed a residential building in Yemen’s capital last month, killing 16 civilians and injuring 17 more – including a five-year-old girl called Buthaina whose photograph went viral after the strike – was made in the US, Amnesty International has said.

The assessment was based on an examination of the remnants of the weapon used in the 25 August airstrike.

The Saudi Arabia-led military coalition admitted carrying out the attack, blaming civilian casualties on a “technical error”.

Lynn Maalouf, Amnesty International’s Middle East research director, said: “We can now conclusively say that the bomb that killed Buthaina’s parents and siblings, and other civilians, was made in the USA.

Yemen has been since March 2015 under a brutal aggression by Saudi-led coalition. Tens of thousands of Yemenis have been injured or martyred in Saudi-led strikes, with the vast majority of them are civilians.

The coalition has been also imposing a blockade on the impoverished country’s ports and airports as a part of his aggression which is aimed at restoring power to fugitive former president Abdrabbuh Mansour Hadi.

SourceWebsites

Related Articles

 

Hundreds of Thousands of Yemenis Mark 3rd Anniversary of September Revolution

September 21, 2017

Revolution anniversary

Hundreds of thousands of people have gathered in the Yemeni capital, Sanaa, to mark the third anniversary of the country’s September 21 Revolution and condemn the bloody Saudi war against the nation.

The demonstrators in Thursday’s mass rally reaffirmed their commitment to the government in Sanaa and the Yemeni forces defending the country against an ongoing Saudi war.

Large crowds from across the country have been flocking to the capital since Thursday morning to celebrate the occasion.

A convoy of UAE military forces captured by Yemeni forces during their operations was also displayed at the rally. The military equipment was being used by Saudi-led troops and pro-Riyadh militia fighting on the ground against the Yemeni army, which is backed by the Houthi Ansarullah revolutionary fighters and popular groups.

In September 2014, the Ansarullah fighters took state matters in their hands in Sanaa amid the absence of an efficient government there.

Before gaining control of the capital, the Houthis had set a deadline for the political parties to put aside differences and fill the power vacuum, but the deadline was missed without any change in the impoverished country’s political scene.

However, the former Saudi-backed president, Abd Rabuh Mansur Hadi, later stepped down, refusing a call by the Houthi movement to reconsider the move.

Hadi then fled to Saudi Arabia, which launched a military campaign against Yemen along with a number of its allies in March 2015 to reinstall Hadi and crush the Houthi movement.

In a speech aired on al-Masirah TV on Wednesday on the anniversary of the revolution, leader of the Ansarullah movement Abdul-Malik al-Houthi slammed the Saudi-led war against the country.

He praised the existing diversity in Yemen’s social fabric and warned that the enemy, including the US, Zionist entity and the Saudi-led coalition, seeks to use such differences to create divisions in the country and disintegrate Yemen.

More than 12,000 people have been killed since the onset of the Saudi military campaign more than two and a half years ago. Much of the Arabian Peninsula country’s infrastructure, including hospitals, schools and factories, has been reduced to rubble due to the war.

SourcePress TV

Related Videos

Related Articles

 

The Guardian View on Saudi Arabia: The Seventh Son Rises

19-09-2017 | 13:50

A crackdown on dissent by the youngest heir apparent in Saudi history will not help the desert kingdom find a way out of an economic mess at home and misguided entanglements abroad

MBS

The ascension in June of Muhammed bin Salman as crown prince of Saudi Arabia was an instant Rorschach test for observers of the desert kingdom. Is he a reformer prepared to drag his kingdom, a repressive regime that writes very large welfare cheques, into the 21st century or a callow princeling whose rise to power could destabilize the region? The 31-year-old prince has undoubtedly amassed great power and dominates Saudi economic, diplomatic and domestic policy.

The crown prince, known as MBS, is also the architect of the bloody quagmire of the Yemen war and a hardliner in the current Gulf row with neighboring Qatar. His father, King Salman, 81, is not in good health, walks with a stick and suffers from brain fades in meetings. By anointing his seventh son as the youngest heir apparent in Saudi history, the ailing monarch has signaled a decisive break with the past.

If the first few months are a reliable guide, then the omens for the future are not good. The palace coup that saw MBS take power was bloodless. In the summer’s Game of Thrones, his powerful uncles and rivals were either sidelined or placed under house arrest. The sense of how riven the Saudi royal house is could be gleaned from reports, sourced from within the court, claiming the other leading contender for the throne had a drug problem. Last week it emerged that Saudi authorities had launched a crackdown on dissent, targeting Islamic thinkers, public critics and political rivals.

Two prominent clerics were taken away for failing to publicly declare their support for the crown prince’s stance toward Qatar.

Both are popular with the Saudi public, with millions of Twitter followers. Another journalist has been banned from writing opinion columns, while human rights activists have been given outlandish eight-year prison sentences for peaceful campaigning. Whatever MBS’s public face, this intolerance of dissent is almost paranoid.

If there was time for Saudi society to debate how to proceed, it’s probably now. Saudi Arabia was the cradle of [extremism] so its stability is a global concern. In domestic terms, Saudi Arabia is a mess.

The kingdom is the world’s largest oil exporter, with reserves of 260bn barrels – but it is a one-trick economy. Oil prices have plummeted from the highs of 2014, forcing Riyadh to spend some $200bn from its foreign exchange reserves to cover its deficit.

In response the crown prince instigated a Thatcherite program of privatization and subsidy cuts to balance the books. But these moves threatened the social contract between the royal family and its subjects, the majority of whom are under 35.
On the world stage, Saudi Arabia has been forced on the back foot by events and its own incompetence.

The war in Yemen, costly in civilian lives, and a blockade of Qatar are a result of draining infatuations.

Instead of succeeding, those obsessions have been embarrassments for the crown prince. Riyadh is now courting Iraq’s leadership – especially those close to Iran. It has withdrawn from Syria, leaving that country’s future in the hands of Moscow, Ankara and Tehran.

Source: The Guardian, Edited by website team

Sayyed al-Houthi Warns Saudi-led Coalition: Our Missiles Can Reach Abu Dhabi

16-09-2017 | 08:19

In March 2015, the Saudi-led military campaign against Yemen was ambitiously named “Operation Decisive Storm”. Nearly three years into the conflict, and Riyadh’s war can be described as anything but “decisive”.

Ansarullah ballistic missile

Sparking the worst cholera epidemic in generations and leaving millions facing starvation, the Saudis and their allies have killed tens of thousands of Yemenis, while failing to achieve any of their stated military objectives.

“The Saudis planned to bomb the Houthis [Ansarullah] into submission and that clearly didn’t work. The two-year campaign is a failure. The Houthis were not defeated and they are stronger,” says Yemen expert Nadwa al-Dawsari.

Although this new reality has given way to an increasingly desperate Saudi monarchy attempting to claw its way out of the Yemen quagmire, there are still those within the coalition’s security structure that believe they can have ‘peace with honor’ by forcing Ansarullah to make more concessions at the negotiating table.

Their strategy appears to revolve around the capture of the crucial Houthi-controlled port in Yemen’s Hodeidah, which would choke off the only supply route for the country’s desperately-needed food aid, exacerbating the already dire humanitarian catastrophe.

In response, Ansarullah’s leader, Sayyed Abdel-Malek al-Houthi, issued a stern warning to the members of the coalition.

In a televised speech on Thursday, Sayyed Houthi said that his group’s ballistic missiles were capable of reaching the United Arab Emirates [UAE], its capital Abu Dhabi, as well as any location inside Saudi Arabia.

“Today the port of Hodeidah is being threatened and we cannot turn a blind eye to that,” he said. “We have to take steps that we haven’t taken before.”

Reuters reported that it “was unclear whether the Houthi group has the capability to carry out its threats.”

But according to an Ansarullah activist, Hussein al-Boukhaiti, the preparations have already been completed.

“About a week ago, they [Ansarullah] launched a ballistic missile towards the United Arab Emirates, it was a test missile,” al-Boukhaiti explains.

Citing sources close to the group’s military wing, he says, “we know the missiles can reach Abu Dhabi”.

“Abdul Malik Al Houthi is not going to say something that he isn’t capable of doing,” al-Boukhaiti adds. “If you remember Riyadh; he said we can hit Riyadh and people doubted the group’s capacity, the same way they are doubting it now. But after a couple of weeks they launched several missiles towards Riyadh.”

The Saudi dissident and director of the Institute for Gulf Affairs, Ali al-Ahmed, believes that Houthi’s comments “will affect the UAE’s approach to the conflict because if one missile lands in a place like Dubai, the country stands to lose billions of dollars.”

Known for luxury shopping, ultramodern architecture and a lively nightlife scene, Dubai is practically a stone’s throw away from Abu Dhabi. Any disruption of its image as a safe regional business and tourist hub could be catastrophic for the UAE and the entire Gulf Cooperation Council [GCC].

The UAE’s ambition

When Riyadh unleashed its “storm” on Yemen, it was understood that the Saudis would be doing most of the heavy lifting, with other coalition members making primarily symbolic contributions.

But as the bloody conflict dragged on, some withdrew their participation altogether, while others stepped up their involvement.

In the lead-up to its bold entry into the fray in Yemen, the UAE sent security forces to neighboring Bahrain to crush a popular uprising in 2011, while playing an instrumental role in propping up an insurgency that toppled Libya’s Moammar Qaddafi.

The progression of the Yemeni conflict also led to the evolution of the UAE’s agenda and its ambitions. Today, the Gulf state is determined to project a more assertive image of a powerful military force capable of influencing the outcome of Middle Eastern conflicts on behalf of its own national interests.

These interests have not only put the UAE on a collision course with the Saudis at times, but have also made it a more strategic target for the Ansarullah-led alliance.

The timing of Sayyed Houthi’s decision to unveil Ansarullah’s capabilities to strike targets in the UAE is also interesting.

The Emiratis are reportedly spearheading efforts to try and create a power struggle in Sanaa, in the hope of undermining Yemen’s alliance against the Saudi-led coalition.

During his address on Thursday, Sayyed Houthi intentionally broached the subject, letting Yemen’s enemies know that the country’s different parties had reached an agreement on “political stability.”

The question now is whether the Saudis and their coalition partners will heed Sayyed Houthi’s warnings, or whether they insist on a demonstration of Ansarullah’s capabilities with potentially disastrous consequences. The chosen course of action will certainly be of interest to all the major players involved in this bloody, unending conflict.

Source: Al-Ahed News

Related Videos

ستون دقيقة مع ناصر قنديل: أستنا، اليمن  وكوريا

Related News

HOUTHIS LEADER THREATENS TO LAUNCH MISSILES ON UAE CAPITAL, SAUDI OIL FACILITIES

South Front

Houthis Leader Threatens To Launch Missiles On UAE Capital, Saudi Oil Facilities

On September 14, Sayyid Abdul-Malik Badreddin al-Houthi leader of Ansar Allah Movement – Known as the Houthis – threatened to target the UAE capital Abu Dubai in a live speech on the Yemeni al-Masirah news TV channel. Sayyid al-Houthi said that the UAE is now within the range of Houthis missiles.

“All companies (working) in the UAE should no longer see it as safe,” Sayyid al-Houthi said.

Sayyid al-Houthi revealed that his forces conducted a “successful” test of a new missile that could reach the Abu Dhabi city 600km away. On August 30, Yemeni sources speculated that Houthis launched a ballistic missile on the UAE capital Abu Dhabi. Only now it is confirmed that the Houthis could have these capabilities.

UAE Minister of State for Foreign Affairs Anwar Gargash responded to Sayyid al-Houthi threats on Twitter and said that his country is not intimidated by Houthi threats.

The Houthis’ comments threatening the UAE and its capital are tangible proof of the need for the Decisive Storm [The name of the Saudi-led military operation in Yemen],” Gargash said.

Moreover, Sayyid al-Houthi revealed in his speech that UAVs of the Houthis have flown many times for hundreds of kilometers over the Saudi territories. Sayyid al-Houthi threatened that soon these UAVs will bomb targets inside the Saudis territories even.

On March 23, a researcher of the Conflict Armament Research group said that UAE forces reported that the Houthis use Iranian-supplied suicide UAVs to target the radars of the Saudi-led coalition MIM-104 Patriot surface-to-air missile systems deployed in Yemen.

Sayyid al-Houthi statement and the Conflict Armament Research group research confirms that the Houthis have the ability to conduct attacks using UAVs.

Furthermore, in his speech Sayyid al-Houthi warned Saudi Arabia from attacking the strategic al-Hudaydah seaport on the Red Sea in western Yemen. Sayyid al-Houthi said that many oil production facilities in Saudi Arabian are within the range of his force missile.

Sayyid al-Houthi even said in his speech: “We [The Houthis] could target Saudi oil tankers and we could do anything.”

The Houthis already proven that they are capable indeed of attacking sea vessels with various weapon systems.

On January 30, the Houthis hit a Saudi Navy frigate with a Remotely-Controlled Boat-Borne Improvised Explosive Device (RC BBIED). On October 1, 2016, the Houthis hit the US-made HSV-2 Swift vessel that was operation for the UAE Navy with an unidentified anti-ship missile.

There is a real chance that the Houthis could be capable of carrying out at least a a part of their commander’s threats relaying mainly on the Iranian-supplied technology.

Related Videos

Related News

 

‘Our missiles capable of reaching UAE’ – Houthi leader

15/09/2017

BEIRUT, LEBANON (6:40 A.M.) – The leader of the Ansarullah movement, Sayyed ‘Abdel-Malek Al-Houthi, stated during a televised speech on Thursday that Houthi missiles are capable of reaching the United Arab Emirates (UAE).

He added that Ansarullah also had several domestically-manufactured drones in its inventory that would become operational in the near future.

Furthermore, Sayyed Houthi stressed that Ansarullah fighters and Yemeni army soldiers were fighting against the US’ state-of-the-art military technology, which Saudi and Emirati forces were using in Yemen.

He went on to say that Saudi Arabia had failed on numerous occasions during its military campaign against Yemen, stressing that officials in Riyadh have not come to their senses, despite huge losses that the oil-rich kingdom has suffered as a result of its adventurism.

“Saudi Arabia and the UAE are paying the price of their erroneous policies. Such mistakes have forced them to alter their approach to the conflict in Syria,” Sayyed Houthi commented.

Sayyed Houthi also said his fellow fighters could target Saudi interests in the strategic Bab el-Mandeb Strait, which connects the Red Sea to the Gulf of Aden, underlining that Ansarullah missiles could hit oil installations in Saudi Arabia’s mainland as well.

Source: Al-Manar and Al-Masirah

Related News

%d bloggers like this: