Going for Regime-Change in Doha

Trump talks tough and calls in the generals after Qatari emir, fearing a trap, snubs his mediation offer

The strongly-worded warning issued to Qatar on Friday by US President Donald Trump – accusing it of being a “funder of terrorism… at a very high level” and demanding that it “stop immediately supporting terrorism” — suggests that the US has not only signed up fully to the Saudi-UAE-Egyptian-Bahraini alliance against Qatar, but assumed its leadership.  It also confirms that the steps taken by the four countries to blockade Qatar and suffocate it economically had prior American approval.

This amounts to a conditional American declaration of war. When Trump announces at a White House press conference, ‘I’ve decided, along with Secretary of State Rex Tillerson, our great generals, and military people, the time has come to call on Qatar to end its funding,’ the meaning cannot be clearer in this regard.

Trump struck this hard-line stance just hours after Tillerson made statements about the crisis in the Gulf that were conciliatory and calming in tone. He urged Saudi Arabia, the UAE, Egypt and Bahrain to ease their blockade of Qatar, arguing that it was damaging to US military operations against the Islamic State (IS) group in addition to causing humanitarian harm.

In our view, this sudden toughening of the American position was a response to the way the emir of Qatar, Sheikh Tamim bin-Hamad Al Khalifa, turned down Trump’s invitation to him and the other principals in the crisis to travel to Washington to explore for solutions. He justified his refusal to attend on the grounds that he could not leave his country while it remained under blockade. This angered the US president, who has been behaving like an emperor and thinks his orders cannot be disobeyed.

Emir Tamim does not trust the US administration, and fears the invitation could merely have been a trap to keep him in the US and prevent him from returning home, while Saudi and UAE forces invade in support of an internal coup that deposes him as ruler and installs a new emir from the other wing of the ruling Al Thani. The 10,000 US troops based at al-‘Udaid in Qatar also could conceivably play a supporting role in such a scheme.

It was striking that during the three summits that were convened for him in Riyadh earlier this month (with Saudi, Gulf and Arab/Islamic leaders respectively), Trump adopted wholesale the foreign policy of Saudi Arabia and the UAE which deems Iran to be the spearhead of terrorism in the region. He supported their severing of ties with and closure of their borders and airspace to Qatar on the grounds that is an ally of Iran and supporter of terrorism, in the view of this new alliance.

When Trump instructs his generals, as he did at the White House press conference, to take practical measures to oblige Qatar to stop funding terrorism, that leaves Doha with very few options. It can either accept the ten conditions to which Saudi Arabia and its allies demanded its immediate compliance, or it must face up to the consequences of refusing to do so.

The summary expulsion, in a harsh manner, of Qatari citizens from Saudi Arabia, the UAE and Bahrain and the three Gulf countries’ closure of their borders and severing of relations is a declaration of war that spells of the end of the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) as we have known it. Trump’s adoption of these steps, meanwhile, aborts the so-called ‘Arab/Islamic NATO’ as it was proposed at the Riyadh summits. Instead, this alliance will be reduced to one based solely on the members of the Gulf/Arab anti-Qatar coalition. When Saudi Arabia, the UAE and Bahrain enact laws that punish expressions of support for Qatar on social media with 15 years imprisonment or fines of up to one million dollars, this means that all the talk of brotherhood and common bonds between the Gulf states has evaporated forever – along with any remaining lip-service to respecting human rights.

Qatar has announced that it will not submit to tutelage or surrender in the face of attempts to suffocate and blockade it, and will therefore not change its foreign policy. It has begun to seek support and protection from its friends in Ankara and Tehran. This could prompt its adversaries to take even harsher and more aggressive measures against it, such as Egypt preventing Qatari gas exports from transiting the Suez Canal.

Qatar has cards of its own to play, such as shutting down the pipeline that supplies Qatari gas to the UAE, or expelling 200,000 resident Egyptian migrant workers. But it has insisted that it will not resort to such measures, and that Egyptian workers will not be harmed and Qatari gas will continue being pumped.

It was evident from the outset of this crisis that it would becoming increasingly serious, and now it can be expected to escalate further – especially after the Emir of Kuwait Sheikh Sabah al-Ahmad fell into a state of depression due to the failure of his mediation effort, to which not all sides were responsive.

Image result

Emir of Kuwait Sheikh Sabah Al-Ahmed Al-Jaber Al-Sabah (Source: da.gov.kw)

When Trump brings his generals – some of them based at al-Aideed — into the crisis and orders them to act to stop Qatar form supporting terrorism, we should expect the worst. The ‘worst’ in this case could mean a military solution and enforced regime-change. And that would mean setting the region, in part or in whole, ablaze.

This article was first published by Raialyoum

 

This Is The Real Story Behind The Crisis Unfolding In Qatar

Only Shakespeare’s plays could come close to describing such treachery – the comedies, that is

By Robert Fisk

June 11, 2017 “Information Clearing House” –

The Qatar crisis proves two things: the continued infantilisation of the Arab states, and the total collapse of the Sunni Muslim unity supposedly created by Donald Trump’s preposterous attendance at the Saudi summit two weeks ago.

After promising to fight to the death against Shia Iranian “terror,” Saudi Arabia and its closest chums have now ganged up on one of the wealthiest of their neighbours, Qatar, for being a fountainhead of “terror”. Only Shakespeare’s plays could come close to describing such treachery. Shakespeare’s comedies, of course.

For, truly, there is something vastly fantastical about this charade. Qatar’s citizens have certainly contributed to Isis. But so have Saudi Arabia’s citizens.

No Qataris flew the 9/11 planes into New York and Washington. All but four of the 19 killers were Saudi. Bin Laden was not a Qatari. He was a Saudi.

But Bin Laden favoured Qatar’s al-Jazeera channel with his personal broadcasts, and it was al-Jazeera who tried to give spurious morality to the al-Qaeda/Jabhat al-Nusrah desperadoes of Syria by allowing their leader hours of free airtime to explain what a moderate, peace-loving group they all were.

Saudi Arabia cuts ties with Qatar over terror links

First, let’s just get rid of the hysterically funny bits of this story. I see that Yemen is breaking air links with Qatar. Quite a shock for the poor Qatari Emir, Sheikh Tamim bin Hamad al-Thani, since Yemen – under constant bombardment by his former Saudi and Emirati chums – doesn’t have a single serviceable airliner left with which to create, let alone break, an air link.

The Maldives have also broken relations with Qatar. To be sure, this has nothing to do with the recent promise of a Saudi five-year loan facility of $300m to the Maldives, the proposal of a Saudi property company to invest $100m in a family resort in the Maldives and a promise by Saudi Islamic scholars to spend $100,000 on 10 “world class” mosques in the Maldives.

And let us not mention the rather large number of Isis and other Islamist cultists who arrived to fight for Isis in Iraq and Syria from – well, the Maldives.

Now the Qatari Emir hasn’t enough troops to defend his little country should the Saudis decide to request that he ask their army to enter Qatar to restore stability – as the Saudis persuaded the King of Bahrain to do back in 2011. But Sheikh Tamim no doubt hopes that the massive US military air base in Qatar will deter such Saudi generosity.

When I asked his father, Sheikh Hamad (later uncharitably deposed by Tamim) why he didn’t kick the Americans out of Qatar, he replied:

“Because if I did, my Arab brothers would invade me.”

Like father, like son, I suppose. God Bless America.

All this started – so we are supposed to believe – with an alleged hacking of the Qatar News Agency, which produced some uncomplimentary but distressingly truthful remarks by Qatar’s Emir about the need to maintain a relationship with Iran.

Qatar denied the veracity of the story. The Saudis decided it was true and broadcast the contents on their own normally staid (and immensely boring) state television network. The upstart Emir, so went the message, had gone too far this time. The Saudis decided policy in the Gulf, not miniscule Qatar. Wasn’t that what Donald Trump’s visit proved?

But the Saudis had other problems to worry about. Kuwait, far from cutting relations with Qatar, is now acting as a peacemaker between Qatar and the Saudis and Emiratis. The emirate of Dubai is quite close to Iran, has tens of thousands of Iranian expatriates, and is hardly following Abu Dhabi’s example of anti-Qatari wrath.

Oman was even staging joint naval manoeuvres with Iran a couple of months ago. Pakistan long ago declined to send its army to help the Saudis in Yemen, because the Saudis asked for only Sunni and no Shia soldiers; the Pakistani army was understandably outraged to realise that Saudi Arabia was trying to sectarianise its military personnel.

Pakistan’s former army commander, General Raheel Sharif, is rumoured to be on the brink of resigning as head of the Saudi-sponsored Muslim alliance to fight “terror”.

Five things to know about Qatar’s first 2022 World Cup stadium

President-Field Marshal al-Sissi of Egypt has been roaring against Qatar for its support of the Egyptian Muslim Brotherhood – and Qatar does indeed support the now-banned group which Sissi falsely claims is part of Isis – but significantly Egypt, though the recipient of Saudi millions, also does not intend to supply its own troops to bolster the Saudis in its catastrophic Yemen war.

Besides, Sissi needs his Egyptian soldiers at home to fight off Isis attacks and maintain, along with Israel, the siege of the Palestinian Gaza Strip.

But if we look a bit further down the road, it’s not difficult to see what really worries the Saudis. Qatar also maintains quiet links with the Assad regime. It helped secure the release of Syrian Christian nuns in Jabhat al-Nusrah hands and has helped release Lebanese soldiers from Isis hands in western Syria. When the nuns emerged from captivity, they thanked both Bashar al-Assad and Qatar.

And there are growing suspicions in the Gulf that Qatar has much larger ambitions: to fund the rebuilding of post-war Syria. Even if Assad remained as president, Syria’s debt to Qatar would place the nation under Qatari economic control.

And this would give tiny Qatar two golden rewards. It would give it a land empire to match its al-Jazeera media empire. And it would extend its largesse to the Syrian territories, which many oil companies would like to use as a pipeline route from the Gulf to Europe via Turkey, or via tankers from the Syrian port of Lattakia.

For Europeans, such a route would reduce the chances of Russian oil blackmail, and make sea-going oil routes less vulnerable if vessels did not have to move through the Gulf of Hormuz.

So rich pickings for Qatar – or for Saudi Arabia, of course, if the assumptions about US power of the two emirs, Hamad and Tamim, prove worthless. A Saudi military force in Qatar would allow Riyadh to gobble up all the liquid gas in the emirate.

But surely the peace-loving “anti-terror” Saudis – let’s forget the head-chopping for a moment – would never contemplate such a fate for an Arab brother.

So let’s hope that for the moment, the routes of Qatar Airways are the only parts of the Qatari body politics to get chopped off.

This article was first published by The Independent

The views expressed in this article are solely those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of Information Clearing House.

View image on Twitter

View image on Twitter

Where are ISIS supporters tweeting from the most? Saudi Arabia!
Imagine my shock.
 Click for Spanish, German, Dutch, Danish, French, translation- Note- Translation may take a moment to load.

Trump to Tamim: Pay to Save Your Ass ترامب لتميم: إدفع تَسْلم

انتَظروا واشنطن… فهي الخصم والحكم!

ابراهيم الأمين

لا مأساة تفوق مأساة الإعلام السعودي ــ الإماراتي في نوع الاتهامات المسوقة ضد قطر، إلا مأساة «الجزيرة» التي تنقل مراسلتها في واشنطن، عن مصادر مجهولة، أن تغريدات الرئيس الاميركي دونالد ترامب ــ المعبّرة عن موافقة على ما تقوم به الرياض وأبو ظبي ــ موقف شخصي ولا تعكس موقف الادارة الاميركية.

بين المأساتين، فإن جمهور العاملين أو المتعاطفين أو المنتفعين من الدول المتنازعة يقف مدهوشاً إزاء ما يحصل، ثم يظهر سلوك غير مسبوق عند أبناء الخليج، الذين يصفون ما يجري بأنه زلزال لم يعرفه العرب قبلاً. وكأن ما يحصل في الدول العربية منذ سنوات طويلة لا يسمّى حدثاً. وفي لحظة القسوة هذه، يخرج عرب غاضبون أو متضررون من سياسات دول الخليج، فيطلقون تعليقات وتوصيفات كأن ما يجري هناك يجري في مكان بعيد من العالم، أو أن ما يحصل لا يهمهم. أما الغلاة من الشامتين، فيصل الأمر بهم حدّ تمنّي اشتعال النيران في كل آبار النفط والغاز.
دبلوماسية أهل الصحراء مغلقة، فاتحة الباب أمام نقاش تعرضه وسائل الاعلام التابعة للدول المتنازعة. وهو نقاش قد يعطي الانطباع الخاطئ، لأن من قرر معاقبة قطر، لا يقف عند طبيعة الاتهامات الموجهة اليها.

لكن القيّمين على إعلام المتنازعين ليسوا أصحاب مخيّلة خصبة، بل هم فقراء العقل والإبداع. الموقف عندهم يكون على شاكلة عبارات من زمن البطولات الفارغة مثل القول «طفح الكيل… بلغ السيل الزبى … الانصياع أو العزلة». أما اللائحة الاتهامية، فتتحول الى أحجية يصعب حلها، مثل القول إن مشكلة قطر تكمن في توافقها مع إيران ودعم حماس وحزب الله والحوثيين، ثم إنها في الوقت نفسه تدعم القاعدة وجبهة النصرة وداعش وطالبان، وهي أيضاً، تتواصل مع العدو الصهيوني… ما أحلى العبارة الأخيرة عندما ترد على لسان شخصيات من دائرة الحكم في دول الخليج، (بأسلوب يذكّرنا ببيانات قوى 14 آذار عندنا، حين كانت تفتتح مواقفها الداعية الى نزع سلاح المقاومة بالتشديد على أن إسرائيل عدو يجب ردعه) مع تشديد على إبراز أن قطر تلعب دوراً يضرّ بمصالح العالم (اقرأ الولايات المتحدة الاميركية).

في الدوحة والجهات الإعلامية الدائرة في فلكها، فإن الصورة لا تختلف كثيراً. الخطاب هنا يركز أساساً على محاولة إبراز قوة التحالف بين قطر والإدارة الأميركية. حتى عندما يأتون على مضمون رسائل البريد الإلكتروني الخاصة بسفير الامارات في واشنطن، يقول أنصار الدوحة إنها تعكس سعي أبو ظبي لإحداث ضرر في صورة حلفاء واشنطن، أي قطر، ثم يُكثرون من استضافة عاملين أو باحثين في مراكز دراسات تخضع لنفوذ الادارة الاميركية، وهم يظهرون الشكوك حول دور أميركي في خطوة السعودية والامارات.

مرة جديدة نعود الى المشترك بين الطرفين، وهو استرضاء الجانب الاميركي. وهو مشترك يعكس حقيقة تسليم هذه الدول بأن القرار الفصل يعود الى واشنطن. فهي من يملك السلطة والقدرة على إطلاق الحكم وتنفيذه، ما يجعل أيّ وساطة خليجية أو عربية تقوم بين المتنازعين غير ذات معنى، ما لم تحظَ برعاية الولايات المتحدة أو دعمها. ووساطة الكويت على وجه التحديد باتت تحتاج حكماً الى ضامن، وليس من ضامن في قاموس هؤلاء سوى الولايات المتحدة الاميركية.

في هذا السياق، ليس صدفة أو نوعاً من التسلية أن يسود اعتقاد واسع لدى الجمهور العربي، بأن الحملة تهدف إلى إجبار قطر على دفع حصتها من الأموال الواجب توفيرها للخزينة الاميركية مقابل الحماية والدعم. وحتى الذين يعتقدون أن دفع الاموال بدأ فقط في «قمة النذالة» المنعقدة أخيراً في الرياض، يرون أن قطر لم تقدم على ما فعلته الرياض وأبو ظبي. وبالتالي، فإن واشنطن معنية بتحريك النار من حول الجميع، والتأهب لإطفاء أيّ حريق، شرط الحصول مسبقاً على ثمن كبير.

هذا الاعتقاد يبقى هو الأقرب الى العقل، ليس لأنه لا توجد أهداف أخرى، مثل تعديل طبيعة وآلية الحكم المسيطر على دول مجلس التعاون الخليجي، بل لكون النتيجة المتوخاة أميركياً وغربياً من هذا التعديل هي وضع اليد على المزيد من الثروات العربية الموجودة في أرض الجزيرة العربية، من دون أي ضمانة من قبل أميركا بأنها ستقدر على منع انهيار النظم السياسية القائمة هناك. وعدم وجود هذه الضمانة ليس سببه تمنّع الاميركيين، بل سببه عجز الاميركيين عن القيام بذلك. ومن يعتقد بأن عواصم التاريخ العربي القديم أو المعاصر، في القاهرة وبغداد ودمشق، يمكن أن تلفّها النيران، وتبقى محصورة فيها، فهو مجنون مهما كابر المكابرون!
يبقى السؤال الذي يخصّ الناس، أو من يضع نفسه في خانة المواجهة مع هذه الدول، وكيفية التصرف إزاء حدث ستكون له تداعياته على كل بلادنا وشعوبنا.

ليس من واهم بأن تغييرات نوعية مقبلة على المنطقة. وإذا كانت الانتفاضات أو الثورات أو المؤامرات أو ما شاكل لم تأت بالديموقراطية ولم تحفظ الناس ولا التاريخ في البلدان الملتهبة، فإن من الصعب توقّع خروج دول مدنية وديموقراطية من رحم وحوش القهر القابضين على الجزيرة العربية. ومن يُرِد أن يتّعظ، عليه تمنّي تسويات تمنع احتراق هذه الدول، كي لا تزيد مصائب العرب، لكن، من دون التخلي عن الموقف الصارم بضرورة محاسبة هؤلاء، مثل الآخرين المسؤولين عن ويلاتنا ومآسينا منذ زمن بعيد!

مقالات أخرى لابراهيم الأمين:

Related Videos

Related Articles

طريق المقاومة: معركة التواصل الآمن من طهران إلى فلسطين

(تصميم سنان عيسى) | للصورة المكبرة انقر هنا

ابراهيم الأمين

في جوانب الأزمة الكبيرة القائمة في سوريا والعراق، يتجنّب كثيرون من أبناء بلادنا كما الأطراف المنخرطة في المعركة، الحديث عن البعد الجوهري لما يجري… وهو المتصل بالبعد الجديد لحركة المقاومة ضد الاحتلال والنفوذ الأميركي في المنطقة، وضد الاحتلال الإسرائيلي لأراضٍ عربية.

هذا الكلام لا يعني أنّ جدول أعمال خاصاً بالشعوب في هذه الدول يجب أن يهمل تماماً، لكن لعبة الأولويات تجعل الناس في هذه المنطقة يلتفتون ولو متأخرين، إلى أن ما تلقَّوه من دعم مفاجئ وكبير من جانب الأميركيين والغربيين وحلفائهم، لا يستهدف تطوير حياتهم كبشر بقدر ما يستهدف تغيير طبيعة الحكومات القائمة وسلوكها، وهدف هؤلاء، لن يكون أبداً في تعزيز حقوق المواطن، بل في قمع أي محاولة للتمرد على النظام العالمي المستعمر لبلادنا والناهب لثرواتنا.

بالتالي، ومن دون البقاء أسرى النقاش – غير المجدي للأسف – حول طبيعة الأزمة القائمة وخلفيتها، فإنّ المشترك الفعلي بين القوى المتنازعة والأكثر حضوراً على الأرض، هو الصراع على الدور الاستراتيجي لهذه المنطقة، لا في رسم مستقبل الشرق الأوسط وحسب بل في وضع قواعد جديدة للنفوذ العالمي في منطقتنا. وهذا ما يجب أن يقودنا صراحة إلى مقاربة المرحلة الحالية من الصراعات الهائلة القائمة في العراق وسوريا، والمعارك الأقل سخونة الجارية في فلسطين ولبنان.

مكابر إن لم يكن أكثر، من يريد تجاهل حقيقة التبدّل الجوهري للصراع مع الأميركيين وإسرائيل بعد حرب تموز عام 2006. يومها لم يتعطل المشروع الأميركي ــ الإسرائيلي فحسب، بل جرى تثبيت جدوى خيار المقاومة. وهو ما فرض على قوى محور المقاومة وحكوماته الانتقال إلى مرحلة جديدة من التخطيط والعمل. لذلك، كان متوقعاً أن ينتقل العدو إلى مرحلة أخرى. وبناءً عليه، يمكن الجزم بأنَّ الحرب على سوريا تستهدف دورها المحوري في «هلال المقاومة». فهي أولاً، الحاضن الحقيقي لا الشكلي، للمقاومتين اللبنانية والفلسطينية، وتشكّل ثانياً المجال الحيوي لكل منهما. ثم إن سوريا تمثّل واسطة عقد محور المقاومة الممتد من طهران إلى حزب الله في لبنان. وفوق ذلك، باتت سوريا مزوّداً للمقاومة في جزء مهم من ترسانتها العسكرية، وبعضها ذو طابع استراتيجي.

لذلك، شهدنا جولات كثيرة منذ ست سنوات إلى الآن، ولذلك أيضاًَ كان طبيعياًَ انخراط كل أطراف محور المقاومة في المعركة، كما كان طبيعياً العمل بقوة استثنائية على إبعاد قوى المقاومة الفلسطينية عن هذه المعركة. والحاصل اليوم، أن الجميع أقرّ بصعوبة إسقاط النظام في سوريا. كل ذلك، جعل العدو ينتقل إلى مرحلة تعطيل وظيفية الحكم السوري على صعيد المقاومة في المنطقة. وكان التركيز في الآونة الأخيرة على إبعاد سيطرة الجيش السوري عن الحدود العراقية، نظراً إلى اقتناع الأميركيين والإسرائيليين وحلفائهم من العرب بأن حصول تواصل عراقي ــ سوري على المقاطع الحدودية من شأنه أن يكرّس معادلة الهلال المقاوم ابتداءً من طهران وصولاً إلى لبنان وفلسطين.

من هنا، جاءت الاستراتيجية الأميركية الجديدة التي ركّزت في الأشهر الأخيرة على محاولة فرض سيطرتها ــ حيث تستطيع ــ على طول الخط الحدودي بين البلدين. ومن خلال وجهة تترك السيطرة للفصائل الكردية و«قوات سوريا الديموقراطية» في الشمال السوري، والعمل على مساعدة الفصائل المسلحة المحسوبة على أميركا أو غرفة «الموك» في الجنوب الشرقي للسيطرة على المنطقة الممتدة جنوباً حتى معبر التنف. وهو أمر ترافق مع دعم أميركي واضح ومباشر للمجموعات المسلحة في مواجهة تقدم الجيش السوري وحزب الله في المنطقة الجنوبية، بالتزامن مع فرض «فيتو» على مشاركة «الحشد الشعبي» العراقي في معارك الموصل ورسم خطوط حمراء أمامه تمنعه من التقدم باتجاه تلعفر وغربها.

لكن الذي حصل فعلياً، هو أن قوات «الحشد» وصلت إلى الحدود في منطقة أم جريص (غربي القيروان، وجنوبي جبال سنجار)، ما يعدّ عملياً تجاوزاً واضحاً للخطوط الحمر الأميركية، وبما يسمح بفرض معادلة جديدة تقوم على فرض السيطرة على مقاطع من الحدود رغماً عن الإرادة الأميركية.

ويكفي هنا القول إنّ تمكّن قوى محور المقاومة (المتمثلة في «الحشد» عراقياً، والقوات السورية وحزب الله) من السيطرة على مقاطع حدودية إضافية، حتى يُكسَر الهدف الأميركي بإقفال الحدود، ما يجعل أي سيطرة أميركية على بقية الحدود أمراً عديم الجدوى.

عملياً، يمكن القول بأن ما حصل في الشمال، وبرغم أن المسافة التي يسيطر عليها «الحشد» تقلّ عن 15 كلم، فإنها الخطوة الأولى التي تفتح المعابر الاستراتيجية البرية بين أطراف محور المقاومة.

هذا يعني من الناحية العملية تقويض لكل الاستراتيجية الأميركية الرامية إلى منع التواصل السوري ــ العراقي، وبالتالي فإنّ السيطرة على مقاطع حدودية بين البلدين وتحقيق الوصل الجغرافي البري بين بغداد ودمشق، تعني استراتيجياً إسقاط كل المفاعيل التي جرى الرهان عليها للحرب السورية، والمقصود تلك المتعلقة بإسقاط الدور الوظيفي للنظام السوري على مستوى محور المقاومة.

ما هو متوقع في المرحلة المقبلة، يمكن أن يفتح الباب على مفاجآت كبيرة. إذ بالرغم من الانتشار العسكري الأميركي المباشر، فإنّ المواجهة لم تحسم جنوباً مع وصول الجيش السوري وحزب الله إلى مسافة تقلّ عن 80 كيلومتراً من معبر التنف، خصوصاً أنّ أسبوعاً واحداً كان كفيلاً بطرد «داعش» من مساحة 9000 كلم مربع في كل المنطقة التابعة لبادية حمص، وحيث تعرضت مجموعات التنظيم لهزيمة غير مسبوقة، ولا سيما أنها خلّفت وراءها كمية هائلة من الأسلحة المتوسطة والثقيلة.

فمن جهة، يجري الاستعداد من جانب الجيش السوري وحزب الله لخوض معركة استعادة مدينة السخنة (شمال شرق تدمر) التي تفتح الباب أمام معركة باتجاهين متلازمين: فك الحصار عن مدينة دير الزور، واستعادة السيطرة على الجانب السوري من معبر القائم مع العراق. علماً أنّ النقاش قائم بقوة داخل العراق حول إمكانية خوض المعركة الفاصلة في غرب الأنبار، ما يقود القوات العراقية ومعها «الحشد الشعبي» إلى الحدود من جهة القائم، في خطة معاكسة لخطة أميركية تقوم على إنشاء تحالف بين عشائر سورية وعراقية تنتشر على جانبي الحدود بإشراف مشترك مع الأردن، تبقى هذه المنطقة بعيدة عن سيطرة أو نفوذ قوى المحور المقاومة في البلدين.

من جهة ثانية، هناك لعبة عضّ أصابع جارية مع الأميركيين الذين يحاولون فرض واقع ثابت، يقول بمنع محور المقاومة من الاقتراب من هذه النقاط، وفق قواعد يجري تثبيتها حتى مع الجانب الروسي، الذي ربما لا يريد من حلفائه في سوريا التقدم صوب مواجهة الاميركيين على طول المقطع الجنوبي من الحدود مع العراق، لكن دون تخلي موسكو عن دورها في مساعدة الجيش السوري على إنهاء وجود «داعش» في كل هذه المنطقة.

هدف قوى المقاومة في منع إسقاط الحكم في سوريا تحقق، وهدف هذه القوى في محاصرة المجموعات المعادية يتحقق يوماً بعد يوم، أما هدف فتح ثُغَر كبيرة على طول الحدود مع العراق، فهو دخل مرحلة التنفيذ، وليس متوقعاً أن تتراجع قوى المقاومة عن توسيعه وتثبيته وحمايته مهما كلّف الأمر، ما يقود إلى تذكير الجميع بأنّ قواعد العمل في سوريا أو العراق لا تزال محكومة بتوافقات تشمل جميع الأطراف. وبالتالي نحن أمام احتمال كبير بأن تقع المواجهة المباشرة والفعلية بين حلفاء سوريا من حزب الله أو قوات الحرس الثوري، والقوات الأميركية إذا قررت الانخراط مباشرة في المعركة إلى جانب المجموعات المسلحة. وبالنظر إلى خلفية القرار عند حلفاء سوريا، يجب التعامل مع الاحتمال بجدية كبرى، ما يشير إلى شكل جديد من المواجهة في سوريا وربما خارجها…

مقالات أخرى لابراهيم الأمين

Related Videos

Related Articles

(تصميم سنان عيسى) | للصورة المكبرة انقر هنا

ابراهيم الأمين

في جوانب الأزمة الكبيرة القائمة في سوريا والعراق، يتجنّب كثيرون من أبناء بلادنا كما الأطراف المنخرطة في المعركة، الحديث عن البعد الجوهري لما يجري… وهو المتصل بالبعد الجديد لحركة المقاومة ضد الاحتلال والنفوذ الأميركي في المنطقة، وضد الاحتلال الإسرائيلي لأراضٍ عربية.

هذا الكلام لا يعني أنّ جدول أعمال خاصاً بالشعوب في هذه الدول يجب أن يهمل تماماً، لكن لعبة الأولويات تجعل الناس في هذه المنطقة يلتفتون ولو متأخرين، إلى أن ما تلقَّوه من دعم مفاجئ وكبير من جانب الأميركيين والغربيين وحلفائهم، لا يستهدف تطوير حياتهم كبشر بقدر ما يستهدف تغيير طبيعة الحكومات القائمة وسلوكها، وهدف هؤلاء، لن يكون أبداً في تعزيز حقوق المواطن، بل في قمع أي محاولة للتمرد على النظام العالمي المستعمر لبلادنا والناهب لثرواتنا.

بالتالي، ومن دون البقاء أسرى النقاش – غير المجدي للأسف – حول طبيعة الأزمة القائمة وخلفيتها، فإنّ المشترك الفعلي بين القوى المتنازعة والأكثر حضوراً على الأرض، هو الصراع على الدور الاستراتيجي لهذه المنطقة، لا في رسم مستقبل الشرق الأوسط وحسب بل في وضع قواعد جديدة للنفوذ العالمي في منطقتنا. وهذا ما يجب أن يقودنا صراحة إلى مقاربة المرحلة الحالية من الصراعات الهائلة القائمة في العراق وسوريا، والمعارك الأقل سخونة الجارية في فلسطين ولبنان.

مكابر إن لم يكن أكثر، من يريد تجاهل حقيقة التبدّل الجوهري للصراع مع الأميركيين وإسرائيل بعد حرب تموز عام 2006. يومها لم يتعطل المشروع الأميركي ــ الإسرائيلي فحسب، بل جرى تثبيت جدوى خيار المقاومة. وهو ما فرض على قوى محور المقاومة وحكوماته الانتقال إلى مرحلة جديدة من التخطيط والعمل. لذلك، كان متوقعاً أن ينتقل العدو إلى مرحلة أخرى. وبناءً عليه، يمكن الجزم بأنَّ الحرب على سوريا تستهدف دورها المحوري في «هلال المقاومة». فهي أولاً، الحاضن الحقيقي لا الشكلي، للمقاومتين اللبنانية والفلسطينية، وتشكّل ثانياً المجال الحيوي لكل منهما. ثم إن سوريا تمثّل واسطة عقد محور المقاومة الممتد من طهران إلى حزب الله في لبنان. وفوق ذلك، باتت سوريا مزوّداً للمقاومة في جزء مهم من ترسانتها العسكرية، وبعضها ذو طابع استراتيجي.

لذلك، شهدنا جولات كثيرة منذ ست سنوات إلى الآن، ولذلك أيضاًَ كان طبيعياًَ انخراط كل أطراف محور المقاومة في المعركة، كما كان طبيعياً العمل بقوة استثنائية على إبعاد قوى المقاومة الفلسطينية عن هذه المعركة. والحاصل اليوم، أن الجميع أقرّ بصعوبة إسقاط النظام في سوريا. كل ذلك، جعل العدو ينتقل إلى مرحلة تعطيل وظيفية الحكم السوري على صعيد المقاومة في المنطقة. وكان التركيز في الآونة الأخيرة على إبعاد سيطرة الجيش السوري عن الحدود العراقية، نظراً إلى اقتناع الأميركيين والإسرائيليين وحلفائهم من العرب بأن حصول تواصل عراقي ــ سوري على المقاطع الحدودية من شأنه أن يكرّس معادلة الهلال المقاوم ابتداءً من طهران وصولاً إلى لبنان وفلسطين.

من هنا، جاءت الاستراتيجية الأميركية الجديدة التي ركّزت في الأشهر الأخيرة على محاولة فرض سيطرتها ــ حيث تستطيع ــ على طول الخط الحدودي بين البلدين. ومن خلال وجهة تترك السيطرة للفصائل الكردية و«قوات سوريا الديموقراطية» في الشمال السوري، والعمل على مساعدة الفصائل المسلحة المحسوبة على أميركا أو غرفة «الموك» في الجنوب الشرقي للسيطرة على المنطقة الممتدة جنوباً حتى معبر التنف. وهو أمر ترافق مع دعم أميركي واضح ومباشر للمجموعات المسلحة في مواجهة تقدم الجيش السوري وحزب الله في المنطقة الجنوبية، بالتزامن مع فرض «فيتو» على مشاركة «الحشد الشعبي» العراقي في معارك الموصل ورسم خطوط حمراء أمامه تمنعه من التقدم باتجاه تلعفر وغربها.

لكن الذي حصل فعلياً، هو أن قوات «الحشد» وصلت إلى الحدود في منطقة أم جريص (غربي القيروان، وجنوبي جبال سنجار)، ما يعدّ عملياً تجاوزاً واضحاً للخطوط الحمر الأميركية، وبما يسمح بفرض معادلة جديدة تقوم على فرض السيطرة على مقاطع من الحدود رغماً عن الإرادة الأميركية.

ويكفي هنا القول إنّ تمكّن قوى محور المقاومة (المتمثلة في «الحشد» عراقياً، والقوات السورية وحزب الله) من السيطرة على مقاطع حدودية إضافية، حتى يُكسَر الهدف الأميركي بإقفال الحدود، ما يجعل أي سيطرة أميركية على بقية الحدود أمراً عديم الجدوى.

عملياً، يمكن القول بأن ما حصل في الشمال، وبرغم أن المسافة التي يسيطر عليها «الحشد» تقلّ عن 15 كلم، فإنها الخطوة الأولى التي تفتح المعابر الاستراتيجية البرية بين أطراف محور المقاومة.

هذا يعني من الناحية العملية تقويض لكل الاستراتيجية الأميركية الرامية إلى منع التواصل السوري ــ العراقي، وبالتالي فإنّ السيطرة على مقاطع حدودية بين البلدين وتحقيق الوصل الجغرافي البري بين بغداد ودمشق، تعني استراتيجياً إسقاط كل المفاعيل التي جرى الرهان عليها للحرب السورية، والمقصود تلك المتعلقة بإسقاط الدور الوظيفي للنظام السوري على مستوى محور المقاومة.

ما هو متوقع في المرحلة المقبلة، يمكن أن يفتح الباب على مفاجآت كبيرة. إذ بالرغم من الانتشار العسكري الأميركي المباشر، فإنّ المواجهة لم تحسم جنوباً مع وصول الجيش السوري وحزب الله إلى مسافة تقلّ عن 80 كيلومتراً من معبر التنف، خصوصاً أنّ أسبوعاً واحداً كان كفيلاً بطرد «داعش» من مساحة 9000 كلم مربع في كل المنطقة التابعة لبادية حمص، وحيث تعرضت مجموعات التنظيم لهزيمة غير مسبوقة، ولا سيما أنها خلّفت وراءها كمية هائلة من الأسلحة المتوسطة والثقيلة.

فمن جهة، يجري الاستعداد من جانب الجيش السوري وحزب الله لخوض معركة استعادة مدينة السخنة (شمال شرق تدمر) التي تفتح الباب أمام معركة باتجاهين متلازمين: فك الحصار عن مدينة دير الزور، واستعادة السيطرة على الجانب السوري من معبر القائم مع العراق. علماً أنّ النقاش قائم بقوة داخل العراق حول إمكانية خوض المعركة الفاصلة في غرب الأنبار، ما يقود القوات العراقية ومعها «الحشد الشعبي» إلى الحدود من جهة القائم، في خطة معاكسة لخطة أميركية تقوم على إنشاء تحالف بين عشائر سورية وعراقية تنتشر على جانبي الحدود بإشراف مشترك مع الأردن، تبقى هذه المنطقة بعيدة عن سيطرة أو نفوذ قوى المحور المقاومة في البلدين.

من جهة ثانية، هناك لعبة عضّ أصابع جارية مع الأميركيين الذين يحاولون فرض واقع ثابت، يقول بمنع محور المقاومة من الاقتراب من هذه النقاط، وفق قواعد يجري تثبيتها حتى مع الجانب الروسي، الذي ربما لا يريد من حلفائه في سوريا التقدم صوب مواجهة الاميركيين على طول المقطع الجنوبي من الحدود مع العراق، لكن دون تخلي موسكو عن دورها في مساعدة الجيش السوري على إنهاء وجود «داعش» في كل هذه المنطقة.

هدف قوى المقاومة في منع إسقاط الحكم في سوريا تحقق، وهدف هذه القوى في محاصرة المجموعات المعادية يتحقق يوماً بعد يوم، أما هدف فتح ثُغَر كبيرة على طول الحدود مع العراق، فهو دخل مرحلة التنفيذ، وليس متوقعاً أن تتراجع قوى المقاومة عن توسيعه وتثبيته وحمايته مهما كلّف الأمر، ما يقود إلى تذكير الجميع بأنّ قواعد العمل في سوريا أو العراق لا تزال محكومة بتوافقات تشمل جميع الأطراف. وبالتالي نحن أمام احتمال كبير بأن تقع المواجهة المباشرة والفعلية بين حلفاء سوريا من حزب الله أو قوات الحرس الثوري، والقوات الأميركية إذا قررت الانخراط مباشرة في المعركة إلى جانب المجموعات المسلحة. وبالنظر إلى خلفية القرار عند حلفاء سوريا، يجب التعامل مع الاحتمال بجدية كبرى، ما يشير إلى شكل جديد من المواجهة في سوريا وربما خارجها…

مقالات أخرى لابراهيم الأمين

Related Videos

Related Articles

Chaos And Division

Source

 The escalating disagreement between Qatar on the one side, and Saudi Arabia, the UAE, Bahrain, and Egypt on the other side, confirms the rampant chaos and divisions that dominate the  Arab region

tamim.jpg888

By Abdel Bari Atwan

We must admit that this disagreement came as no surprise. What did surprise us, however, are its intensity, the manner in which it was expressed, and the measures and steps that have and may still result from it. After all, four of the aforementioned states are supposedly members of the GCC (Gulf Cooperation Council) and the Arab coalition that is fighting the Houthis and the General People’s Congress [Saleh] party in Yemen. In addition, the four states, or two of them at least, have pumped in billions of dollars and thousands of tons of weapons to fan the flames of the bloody conflict raging in Syria, Libya, and Yemen – and are still doing so.

The GCC has previously witnessed many disagreements, and in fact, political and border wars between its members – especially, Qatar and Saudi Arabia. But what is happening today between the abovementioned states may open a wound that would be difficult to close, and create a rift that will be difficult to bridge, at least in the foreseeable future.

The explosive developments began when the Saudi-owned al-Arabiya and the Emirati-owned Arab Sky News broadcast statements attributed to the Emir of Qatar, Prince Tamim bin Hamad Al Thani, during a graduation ceremony of a number of recruits.

The Emir allegedly protested against the escalation of the disagreement with Iran, adding that it was unwise to be hostile to it. He also allegedly denounced including Hizbollah and Hamas on the list of terrorist organizations, since both are resistance movements. And he accused Saudi Arabia, the UAE, and Bahrain of inciting against Qatar and accusing it of sponsoring terrorism and its organizations. He also took a stab at Saudi Arabia by saying that ‘the states that claim to be fighting terrorism are those that are religiously most hardline and are providing pretexts for the terrorists.’ In fact, he went even further by criticizing the hundreds-of- billions of dollars spent on the purchase of weapons rather than on developmental projects, and when he speculated that Trump’s days in office were now numbered.

Al-Arabiya and Arab Sky News picked up these alleged statements and hosted many Egyptian and Saudi analysts who attacked Qatar mercilessly, accusing it of what they portray as terrorism and hosting terrorist organizations, especially the Muslim Brotherhood. Moreover, al-Arabiya broadcasted an audiotape in which the father of Qatar’s Emir, Sheikh Hamad bin Khalifa, is allegedly heard in a phone conversation with late Libyan leader Mu’ammar al-Qadhafi attacking Saudi Arabia and predicting the collapse of the Al Saud regime. It also reported old statements by former Yemeni president Ali ‘Abdullah Saleh revealing that Qatar’s former Emir had asked him for help in waging sabotage campaigns deep inside Saudi Arabia.

Qatar’s giant media empire, of which Al-Jazeera television is the spearhead, was taken by surprise. It did not respond by issuing clarifications or retaliate in kind. Instead, it continued with its usual programs. This lent some credibility to the anti-Qatar campaign for some time. Then came the first clarification from a Qatari official after a number of hours, in the form of a very short statement claiming that the Qatari News Agency’s website had been hacked by unknown parties, and that the statements attributed to Prince Tamim were false.

But adding to the ‘lack of clarity’ was a ‘Breaking News’ item on al-Arabiya to the effect that Qatari Foreign Minister Sheikh Mohammad bin ‘Abderrahman has instructed the ambassadors of Egypt, Bahrain, the UAE, and Saudi Arabia to leave Doha within 24 hours. The Qatari foreign minister firmly denied this, and said that his statements had been taken out of context.

Saudi Arabia, the UAE, and Bahrain took an immediate decision to impose a blackout on Al-Jazeera’s websites and all Qatari newspapers on the Internet. In fact, it is not unlikely for them to resort to jamming Al-Jazeera on the grounds that Qatar’s denial of the statements attributed to Prince Tamim and its insistence that the Qatari News Agency’s website had been hacked were not ‘convincing.’ They did not alleviate the crisis’ intensity or end the campaign on Qatar.

It is worth noting that this crisis in relations between Qatar on the one hand, and the UAE and Saudi Arabia on the other, follows two important developments:

– The first is U.S. President Donald Trump’s visit to Riyadh and his participation in three Saudi – Gulf, Arab, and Islamic – summits. These summits focused on the war on terrorism and on Iran’s role as the latter’s spearhead, accusing it of playing a major role in undermining the region’s stability. Moreover, the U.S. president held a somewhat tense meeting with the Qatari Emir on the summits’ margins.

– The second development was the appearance of a number of articles in U.S. and Western newspapers attacking Qatar. The latest was in Foreign Policy by John Hannah, a former official in the U.S. defense and state departments and one of former U.S. vice-president Dick Cheney’s advisors. He accused Qatar of backing terrorism, inciting the killing of Americans in Iraq, using Al-Jazeera effectively to transform the Arab Spring into an extremist Islamic Winter, and of financing Islamist groups with money and weapons to fight in Syria. He also accuses Qatar of covering up the presence in Doha of Khaled Sheikh Mohammad, the architect of the 9/11 attacks, and facilitating his escape to Afghanistan before the CIA arrested him.

Furthermore, Hannah accuses Qatar of ‘double-dealing’: Of hosting the ‘Udeid Air Base from which U.S. warplanes that struck Iraq where launched, while also siding with Saddam Hussein’s regime and backing him in the media. Hannah also confirms that Cheney had discussed the possibility of moving ‘Udeid Air Base from Qatar, and says that Trump supports this option, while the UAE and Saudi Arabia are candidates for hosting it. He also demanded that Qatar should be punished for sponsoring terrorism.

Prince Tamim was given a ‘cold’ reception at the Riyadh summit. He only spoke with Mr. Fahd bin Mahmoud, the Deputy PM of the Sultanate of Oman and the head of its delegation. He also had a short word with Saudi Crown-Prince Mohammad bin Nayef. Sources inside the summit tell us that [Abu-Dhabi Crown-Prince] Mohammad bin Zayid did not speak to him or shake his hand at all; he bypassed Prince Tamim instead and stood next to President Trump in one of the official pictures.

The fact that the Qatari media empire in its various branches has confined itself to ‘clarifying’ the hacking of the Qatari News Agency’s website, denying the statements attributed to Prince Tamim, and ‘retracting’ the decision to expel the ambassadors of Saudi Arabia, the UAE, Egypt, and Bahrain, suggests that Qatar has uncharacteristically decided to resort to calming down the situation in an attempt to contain the crisis.

However, we believe that the other side may continue to escalate until Qatar ends its support for the Muslim Brotherhood and its media tools, adopt a more hostile attitude towards Iran, and identifies totally and literally with the policies of the Saudi/Egyptian/Emirati triangle.

Gulf sources have leaked reports of a supposed ‘scenario’ that enjoys a U.S. green light for changing the top leadership in Qatar. They add that what is happening today is a prelude to this. However, there is nothing to confirm this scenario, even though it may not be totally unlikely. After all, a coup attempt did occur in 1996, aimed at toppling the former Emir of Qatar and restoring his father to power. It is ironic that the three states – Saudi Arabia, the UAE, and Egypt – were participants in that failed coup attempt, supporting it with money, weapons, and soldiers.

Will history repeat itself? We have no answer. But the crisis is serious and the estrangement is worsening. And nothing can be excluded these days, in light of the Emirati/Saudi alliance that has not refrained from fighting the war in Yemen and has continued to do so for over two years, and is now beating the drums of another war against Iran, threatening to carry the battle deep inside it.

Here, another question seems legitimate: Who will rush to stand by Qatar’s side and defend it? Will it be Iran, which Qatar and the factions allied with it in Syria and to a lesser extent in Iraq have been fighting? Or will it be Turkey, which is now in a state of hostility with all of its neighbors, as well as with the U.S. and most of Europe’? Or will it be the U.S. ‘Udeid Air Base, which together with its soldiers and warplanes, wants to leave Qatar?

At present, we can do no more than raise questions, and admit that Qatar is in a critical and unprecedented position, facing fierce enemies and having a very small number of allies, at a time when reason and wisdom have been set aside.

But please feel free to correct us if we are wrong.

Related Videos

Related Articles

Looking to the Past, not ISIS, for the True Meaning of Islam

Emir Abdelkader, 19th century Muslim humanist and sheikh

[Ed. note – British journalist Robert Fisk has published an interesting historical retrospect on Abdelkader ibn Muhieddine, or Emir Abdelkader, an Algerian Muslim leader of the 19th century who fought against French imperialism and was a great champion of human rights–of all people. Abdelkader intervened at one point to save a community of Christians in Damascus, Syria, where he spent a portion of his life, and while Fisk doesn’t bother to point it out, his act of saving Syrian Christians is something he shares in common with the present-day leader of Syria, Bashar Assad.

I thought it timely to post such an article since we’ve just seen a deranged individual arrested in Portland, Oregon after allegedly stabbing three people, killing two of them, while spouting hatred for Muslims–a man whose last name is “Christian” no less. So you’ll see a lengthy excerpt from Fisk’s essay on Abdelkader, along with a link to the original article, and just below that I’m also tossing in a video of a group of Syrians, including about 3,000 students, taking a walking tour of Aleppo’s recently-liberated historic areas. A Syrian woman you’ll see interviewed in the video, Anushka Arakelyan, says she hopes that the city will one day be “the same as it was before the war.”

“There are no nationalities here. All people love each other; all live together, rejoice together, cry together and wait together,” she added.

“Aleppo will be the same as it was before the war. We hope and wait,” Arakelyan said.

“As one Russian song says, we hope and wait, and we will wait and hope,” she added.

“We love Aleppo very much. Aleppo is a very good city, very hospitable city. I’m very happy to live here. Here, there are no nationalities. All people love each other; all live together, rejoice together, cry together and wait together,” she concluded. (Uprooted Palestinians )

It would seem, from this lady’s remarkable words, that there are plenty of Muslims who today carry on in the spirit of Abdelkader, and that therefore we don’t have to look to the past to find “the true meaning of Islam”–plenty of examples we can point to in the present. ]

***

We must look to the past, not Isis, for the true meaning of Islam

By Robert Fisk

After the Manchester massacre… yes, and after Nice and Paris, Mosul and Abu Ghraib and 7/7 and the Haditha massacre – remember those 28 civilians, including children, killed by US Marines, four more than Manchester but no minute’s silence for them? And of course 9/11…

Counterbalancing cruelty is no response, of course. Just a reminder. As long as we bomb the Middle East instead of seeking justice there, we too will be attacked. But what we must concentrate upon, according to the monstrous Trump, is terror, terror, terror, terror, terror. And fear. And security. Which we will not have while we are promoting death in the Muslim world and selling weapons to its dictators. Believe in “terror” and Isis wins. Believe in justice and Isis is defeated.

So I suspect it’s time to raise the ghost of a man known as the Emir Abdelkader – Muslim, Sufi, sheikh, ferocious warrior, humanist, mystic, protector of his people against Western barbarism, protector of Christians against Muslim barbarism, so brave that the Algerian state insisted his bones were brought home from his beloved Damascus, so noble that Abe Lincoln sent him a pair of Colt pistols and the French gave him the Grand Cross of the Legion of Honour. He loved education, he admired the Greek philosophers, he forbade his fighters to destroy books, he worshipped a religion which believed – so he thought – in human rights. But hands up all readers who know the name of Abdelkader.

We should think of him now more than ever.

He was not a “moderate” because he fought back savagely against the French occupation of his land. He was not an extremist because, in his imprisonment at the Chateau d’Amboise, he talked of Christians and Muslims as brothers. He was supported by Victor Hugo and Lord Londonderry and earned the respect of Louis-Napoleon Bonaparte (later Napoleon III) and the French state paid him a pension of 100,000 francs. He deserved it.

When the French invaded Algeria, Abdelkader Ibn Muhiedin al-Juzairi (Abdelkader, son of Muhiedin, the Algerian,1808-1883, for those who like obituaries) embarked on a successful guerrilla war against one of the best equipped armies in the Western world – and won. He set up his own state in western Algeria – Muslim but employing Christian and Jewish advisors – and created separate departments (defence, education, etc), which stretched as far as the Moroccan border. It even had its own currency, the “muhamediya”. He made peace with the French – a truce which the French broke by invading his lands yet again. Abdelkader demanded a priest to minister for his French prisoners, even giving them back their freedom when he had no food for them. The French sacked the Algerian towns they captured, a hundred Hadithas to suppress Abdelkader’s resistance. When at last he was defeated, he surrendered in honour – handing over his horse as a warrior – on the promise of exile in Alexandria or Acre. Again the French betrayed him, packing him off to prison in Toulon and then to the interior of France.

Yet in his French exile, he preached peace and brotherhood and studied French and spoke of the wisdom of Plato and Socrates, Aristotle and Ptolemy and Averoes and later wrote a book, Call to the Intelligent, which should be available on every social media platform. He also, by the way, wrote a book on horses which proves he was ever an Arab in the saddle. But his courage was demonstrated yet again in Damascus in 1860 where he lived as an honoured exile. The Christian-Druze civil war in Lebanon had spread to Damascus where the Christian population found themselves surrounded by the Muslim Druze who arrived with Isis-like cruelty, brandishing swords and knives to slaughter their adversaries.

Abdelkader sent his Algerian Muslim guards – his personal militia – to bash their way through the mob and escort more than 10,000 Christians to his estate. And when the crowds with their knives arrived at his door, he greeted them with a speech which is still recited in the Middle East (though utterly ignored these days in the West).

“You pitiful creatures!” he shouted. “Is this the way you honour the Prophet? God punish you! Shame on you, shame! The day will come when you will pay for this … I will not hand over a single Christian. They are my brothers. Get out of here or I’ll set my guards on you.”

Muslim historians claim Abdelkader saved 15,000 Christians, which may be a bit of an exaggeration. But here was a man for Muslims to emulate and Westerners to admire.

His fury was expressed in words which would surely have been used today against the cult-like caliphate executioners of Isis. Of course, the “Christian” West would honour him at the time (although, interestingly, he received a letter of praise from the Muslim leader of wildly independent Chechnya). He was an “interfaith dialogue” man to please Pope Francis.

Abdelkader was invited to Paris. An American town was named after him – Elkader in Clayton County, Iowa, and it’s still there, population 1,273. Founded in the mid-19th century, it was natural to call your home after a man who was, was he not, honouring the Rights of Man of American Independence and the French Revolution? Abdelkader flirted with Freemasonry – most scholars believe he was not taken in – and loved science to such an extent that he accepted an invitation to the opening of the Suez Canal, which was surely an imperial rather than a primarily scientific project. Abdelkader met De Lesseps. He saw himself, one suspects, as Islam’s renaissance man, a man for all seasons, the Muslim for all people, an example rather than a saint, a philosopher rather than a priest.

But of course, Abdelkader’s native Algeria is a neighbour of Libya from where Salman Abedi’s family came, and Abdelkader died in Syria, whose assault by US aircraft – according to Abedi’s sister – was the reason he slaughtered the innocent of Manchester. And so geography contracts and history fades, and Abedi’s crime is, for now, more important than all of Abdelkader’s life and teaching and example. So for Mancunians, whether they tattoo bees onto themselves or merely buy flowers, why not pop into Manchester’s central library in St Peter’s Square and ask for Elsa Marsten’s The Compassionate Warrior or John Kiser’s Commander of the Faithful or, published just a few months ago, Mustapha Sherif’s L’Emir Abdelkader: Apotre de la fraternite?

They are no antidotes for sorrow or mourning. But they prove that Isis does not represent Islam and that a Muslim can earn the honour of the world.

***

Trump Meets the New Leader of the Secular World, Pope Francis

Photo by thierry ehrmann | CC BY 2.0

After two days lecturing a collection of head-choppers, dictators, torturers and land thieves, Donald Trump at last met a good guy on Wednesday. Pope Francis didn’t ask for a $100bn (£77.2bn) arms deal for the Vatican. He wouldn’t go to war with Iran. He didn’t take the Sunni Muslim side against the Shia Muslim side in the next Middle East conflict. He didn’t talk about Palestinian “terror”. And he looked, most of the time, grim, unsmiling, even suspicious.

So he should have been. Trump’s broad, inane smile on confronting the Holy Father might have been more appropriate for the first of the Borgias, Alexander VI, whose 15th century womanising, corruption and enthusiasm for war would match Trump’s curriculum vitae rather well. But the poor man’s pope, who last year suggested that Trump wasn’t much of a Christian because he wanted to build walls, didn’t seem to be very happy to see the man who called him “disgraceful” for questioning his faith. “One offers peace through dialogue, the other security of arms,” one of Francis’ advisers said of the visit. Which pretty much sums it up.

It was indeed an odd sight to see the head of the Catholic church – whose anti-war, anti-corruption, anti-violence and pro-environment beliefs must surely now represent the secular world – greeting the present if very temporary leader of the secular world, whose policies are most surely not those of the Western people he would claim to represent. For more and more, the Good Old Pope is coming to represent what the Trumps and Mays will not say: that the West has a moral duty to end its wars in the Middle East, to stop selling weapons to the killers of the Middle East and to treat the people of the Middle East with justice and dignity.

No wonder the 29 minutes which the insane president and the sane pope spent together – Francis himself suggesting that they both keep away from the microphones – remain secret. Until, I suppose, Trump starts twittering again. They supposedly chatted about climate change, immigration, even arms sales. O fly upon the wall, speak up. And they talked, we are told, about “interreligious dialogue” and the need to protect Christians in the Middle East. They shared, we were finally informed, “a commitment to life, and freedom of speech and conscience” – which is more than most of Trump’s other hosts would have approved of these past two days.

Trump duly handed over a bunch of books by Martin Luther King which he hoped Pope Francis would enjoy – whether he had read them himself remains a mystery – and the Pope gave Trump some of his own writings on the environment. “Well, I’ll be reading them,” said the US President. A likely story.

When the Pope emerged from his private meeting with Trump, he was smiling in a relieved, almost charming way – like a man who had just left the dentist’s chair – and his joke with the veiled Melania about Croatian cookies, if not quite understood, showed that even a distressed pontiff can retain a sense of humor amid spiritual darkness. Trump thought it all “a great honor”. Not for the Pope, one imagines.

And there was the inevitable send-off from Trump, the kind he probably gave to all the greedy kings and criminals of the Middle East. “I won’t forget what you said,” he told Pope Francis as he left. O but he will, reader, he will.

Robert Fisk writes for the Independent, where this column originally appeared. 

More articles by:
%d bloggers like this: