Emirati air defense system downed a Saudi helicopter over the Yemeni city of Marib

Saudi military helicopter bombing Yemen

April 18, 2017

Emirati air defense system downed by mistake a Saudi helicopter over  the Yemeni city of Marib, according to Local sources.

The sources added that 12 Saudi officers and three staffers on board were killed after a rocket struck the helicopter, branded Black Hawk.

Yemen has been since March 26, 2015 under brutal aggression by Saudi-led coalition.

Thousands have been martyred and injured in the attack, with the vast majority of them are civilians.

Riyadh launched the attack on Yemen in a bid to restore power to fugitive ex-president Abd Rabbu Mansour Hadi who is a close ally to Saudi Arabia.

Source: Al-Manar Website

Related Videos

kkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkk

Related Articles

US Imposed Syria Sanctions Hit Children’s Cancer Treatment at Damascus Children’s Hospital

Six years of conflict have brought the Syrian health service, once one of the best in the Middle East, close to collapse

Global Research, March 25, 2017
Gulf News 25 March 2017
syrian children cancer

Damascus: In the cancer ward at Damascus Children’s Hospital, doctors are struggling with a critical shortage of specialist drugs to treat their young patients — and it’s not just due to the general chaos of the Syrian civil war.

Local and World Health Organisation (WHO) officials also blame Western sanctions for severely restricting pharmaceutical imports, even though medical supplies are largely exempt from measures imposed by the United States and European Union.

Six years of conflict have brought the Syrian health service, once one of the best in the Middle East, close to collapse. Fewer than half of the country’s hospitals are fully functioning and numbers of doctors have dived.

The result is tumbling life expectancy — even after accounting for the hundreds of thousands directly killed in the fighting — and soaring deaths in pregnancy and childbirth.

On top of this, cuts in health spending by the government that is fighting a hugely expensive war, a drastic fall in the Syrian currency and indirect effects of the sanctions are all deepening the misery of patients who need foreign-made drugs.

Copy of 2017-03-16T180355Z_1713427651_RC1BBD31B430_RTRMADP_3_MIDEAST-CRISIS-SYRIA-SANCTIONS

Children suffering from cancer at Damascus Children’s Hospital. Image credit: Reuters

For families with sick children, the situation is dire.

At the children’s hospital in government-held Damascus, the waiting room outside the cancer ward was crowded with relatives, many of whom had brought clothes, mattresses and blankets in case they had to spend long periods far from their homes outside the city.

One of them was Naim Der Moussa, 55, who has been living in Damascus for a year to secure regular treatment for his 10-year-old daughter Wa’ad. They left his wife and six other children behind in the eastern city of Deir Al Zor, where government forces are besieged by Daesh.

“My daughter was first diagnosed with kidney cancer and treated,” he said. “Now cancer has been found also in her lungs.”

Before the conflict, Syria produced 90 per cent of the medicines it needed but anti-cancer drugs were among those where it traditionally relied on imports.

Elizabeth Hoff, the WHO representative in Syria, said medicine imports have been hit by significant cuts in the government’s health budget since the war began in 2011 plus a 90 per cent drop in the value of the Syrian pound, which has made some pharmaceuticals prohibitively expensive.

However, a lack of cash is not the only reason why supplies of cancer drugs are falling far short of increasing demand.

“The impact of economic sanctions imposed on Syria heavily affected the procurement of some specific medicine including anti-cancer medicines,” said Hoff. The sanctions were preventing many international pharmaceutical companies from dealing with the Syrian authorities as well as hindering foreign banks in handling payments for imported drugs, she added.

The United States and EU have imposed a range of measures targeted both at the government and some of the many armed groups operating in the country.

Washington has banned the export or sale of goods and services to Syria from the United States or by US citizens.

The EU has imposed travel bans, asset freezes and an arms embargo, with sanctions also targeting financial ties with Syrian institutions, buying oil and gas from the country or investing in its energy industry.

President Bashar Al Assad has partly blamed the sanctions for turning many Syrians into refugees, often heading to Europe.

Both the US and EU regimes include exemptions for medicines and other humanitarian supplies. However, by clamping down on financial transactions and barring much business with the Syrian government, the sanctions are indirectly affecting trade in pharmaceuticals.

Many drugs companies have erred on the side of caution, avoiding any business with Syria for fear of inadvertently falling foul of the sanctions.

The US State Department said the Treasury had authorised services in support of humanitarian activities in Syria, adding that there were legal ways to bring medicine into the country.

The EU also rejected criticism of its sanctions.

“Such measures are not aimed at the civilian population,” an EU spokeswoman said. “EU sanctions do not apply to key sectors of the Syrian economy such as food and medicine.”

She acknowledged firms had increasingly pulled out of business with Syria but said this was also due to other reasons, including “security, reputation, commercial motivation, anti-money laundering measures” and the presence of militant groups.

The WHO brings essential medicines and medical supplies into Syria, procuring generic drugs from approved sources in Europe, North Africa and Asia. Branded US products cannot be imported due to the sanctions situation, Hoff said.

With funds from Kuwait, the WHO has delivered life-saving medicine to more than 16,000 cancer patients, of whom thousands are children with leukaemia.

Damascus2

Syrian girl Rahma sits on a bed as she receives treatment for cancer at Damascus Children’s Hospital. Image Credit:Reuters

But this does not meet demand. Besides cancer medication, there are critical shortages of insulin, anaesthetics, specific antibiotics needed for intensive care, serums, intravenous fluids and other blood products and vaccines, Hoff said.

The overall collapse in Syrian health care has contributed to a drop in life expectancy to 60 years for men and 70 for women in 2014, from 72 and 75 respectively in 2009. Only 44 per cent of hospitals are now fully functioning and more than a quarter aren’t working at all, the WHO said.

By 2014, the number of doctors in Syria had dropped to 1.3 per 1,000 people, less than half the level in neighbouring Jordan and Lebanon.

Against this deterioration, Damascus Children’s Hospital has also come under increasing pressure. Cancer units in the provincial cities of Aleppo and Latakia were both put out of service in fighting earlier in the war.

Now about 200 children visit the Damascus hospital every week, with more than 70 per cent from outside the capital, according to its head, Maher Haddad.

The weight of demand has delayed treatment for dozens of sick children by 15-20 days, affecting their prospects, overall health and response to medication, he added.

Haddad also singled out the sanctions. Pharmex, the state-owned company that buys drugs for government-funded hospitals across Syria, was able to provide only 5-10 per cent of the cancer medication that is required, he told Reuters.

“Most of the cancer medicines are imported. Pharmex used to import the stock of medicines that public hospitals need. But it has not been able to do so largely because of the economic sanctions, I believe,” he said.

His hospital has only 36 free beds, with 17 of those allocated to children with cancer.

In the waiting room, a woman who identified herself only by her first name Nawal, said she travels from the Qalamoun area north of Damascus every fortnight with her 14-year-old daughter who requires chemotherapy treatment for leukaemia.

“We don’t have hospitals or charities in Qalamoun. Free treatment is offered only at the Children’s Hospital in Damascus,” Nawal said.

One private charity, Basma, is trying to help out by funding cancer drugs for poor families. The proportion of patients who need assistance has risen from about 30 per cent to nearly 80 per cent since the war began, executive manager Rima Salem said.

Salem finds the delays in treatment worrying.

“A child with cancer might die waiting for his turn to get treatment,” she said.

Yemeni protesters mark 2nd anniversary of Saudi war

 

Related 

Russia delivers humanitarian aid to Yemen, USA/Saudi delivers more bombs

Russian humanitarian aid arrives in Yemen

A Russian NGO has delivered lifesaving aid to the desperate population of war-torn Yemen, where over 18 million people now urgently require some form of humanitarian assistance.

The first delivery of humanitarian aid from the Russian Humanitarian Mission, which cares for the needy in conflict zones, began arriving at the Darawan refugee camp, in the western Yemeni province of Amran on Thursday.

Filled with life essential supplies for the internally displaced people who are temporarily residing in the camp, the first batch of aid comprised basic foodstuff, medicines, tents and blankets.

The largely forgotten crisis in Yemen has been raging for nearly two deadly years with no end in sight. Over 18 million people in Yemen now require some form of urgent humanitarian intervention in a conflict classified by the United Nations as a Level 3 emergency or as a most severe, large-scale humanitarian crisis.

To help alleviate the human suffering in Yemen, the Russian Humanitarian Mission initiated an aid drive, where anyone willing to contribute donated anything that they could to help their fellow beings. Little by little, the mission gathered enough supplies to fill the aid convoy.

Yemen, already the poorest country in the Arabian Peninsula even before the conflict, has seen the humanitarian situation further aggravated by fighting, forced displacement, and shortages of basic commodities.

Deadly diseases, most notably cholera, and the destruction of medical facilities on the ground by the continued Saudi-led bombing campaign are exacerbating the humanitarian suffering there.

According to UN estimates, some 10.3 million people are in “acute need” of immediate, lifesaving assistance. As of January 2017, at least 2 million people remained displaced by the brutal fighting. Another 1 million have returned to living in difficult conditions with limited access to food, water and healthcare.

The UN estimates that 14.8 million people lack access to basic healthcare. Only 45 per cent of health facilities are functioning, and as of October 2016, at least 274 health facilities had been damaged or destroyed, largely due to Saudi-led air strikes.

This development is especially impacting the women and children. About 3.3 million children and pregnant or lactating women are malnourished.

The war, which has so far claimed at least 10,000 lives, started in March 2015 when Saudi Arabia and its coalition of Arab countries began bombing Yemen to reinstall its ousted Sunni president.

Over the two-year military assault, Saudi warplanes have reportedly been bombing schools, hospitals, marketplaces, and other non-military targets. Leading rights groups say such indiscriminate attacks should be considered war crimes.

The most prominent human rights groups have made repeated appeals to the UK and the US — the biggest arms suppliers to Riyadh — to stop providing weapons.

During Barack Obama’s two terms as president, the US sold Saudi Arabia $115 billion worth of arms in 42 separate deals, the Center for International Policy, a US-based anti-war think tank reported in September.

It estimated that US arms offers to Saudi Arabia were more than any US administration in the history of US-Saudi relations. Meanwhile, according to Campaign Against the Arms Trade (CAAT), Britain licensed £3.3 billion (US$4.1 billion) of arms sales to Riyadh during the first 12 months of the Yemen war.

 

Mirror, Mirror, who is the Victim?

Zeinab Daher

While the entire world sympathized with the death of the three year-old Aylan al-Kurdi off the Mediterranean, the exact same world remained silent towards the martyrdom of the 12 year-old Yemeni girl Ishraq al-Muafha whose life was taken last week in a Saudi massacre at the al-Falah Primary School in the District of Nihm.

Mirror, Mirror, who is the Victim?

A schoolbag, a severed limb and an innocent body lying on the desert, is what was left from the young Ishraq. The little girl was a victim of one of the many Saudi massacres that do not receive much condemnation – or at least attention – of the global media, the international public opinion and the world leaders’ ‘sympathy’.

The dominant hypocrisy of the mainstream media, the biggest liar influencing public reactions to ongoing developments, is the main cause of injustice practiced against people of Yemen. While militants in Syria are referred to as rebels, the resistance in Yemen conduct ‘attacks’ according to media outlets.

The media blackout surrounding the humanitarian situation in Yemen is evidence that children there are the number one victim of the ongoing aggression. Only in the impoverished war-torn Yemen do six children die every hour due to various preventable diseases.

Meanwhile, 9.6 million children are in need of humanitarian and health care and 2.2 million children are suffering from malnutrition, almost all of severe cases.

Besides, 1.8 million of the Yemeni children are, unfortunately, out of school. But wait, perhaps those out of school are luckier than the others. Maybe those deprived from education are likely to be martyred next to their families instead of dying alone on the way back home from school or vice versa, just like the case of Ishraq.

An image of a soulless body, sadly, didn’t touch the ‘hearts’ of those who claim to defend human rights, and the rights of children and their childhood in particular.

In this regard, Professor of Media in the Faculty of Media and Documentation at the Lebanese University Dr. Abbas Mzannar said to Al-Ahed News in an exclusive interview that “On the level of hiding the news of the Yemeni children, it is a sort of bedimming propaganda in such media war. Such blacking out aims at hiding the humanitarian image that was pretty much activated with media globalization. Media globalization originated at the beginning of the war in Bosnia and Herzegovina. The humane speech during war there emerged and was being used by NATO, stressing the humanitarian role of power.”

Dr. Mzannar further explained that: “The image proved in the wars of the so-called Arab Spring its major role, especially in the presence of the multimedia devices that can reveal the image but can also fake it. As for Yemen, even the very simple images were not circulated; we have always seen destruction but we haven’t seen victims and images didn’t reflect this flagrant aggression.”

The expert in media stressed that Yemen represented a symbolic icon of perseverance and not surrendering to the so-called Arab deterrence, which is in fact American deterrence with Arab coalition and sponsorship.

“The Yemeni example, frankly speaking, is legendary and miraculous. What is going on in Yemen, resisting this flagrant aggression for almost two years, is a giant persistence. The Yemeni people offered enormous patience and persistence and revealed the historic image of the revolutionary Yemen which doesn’t surrender. They are trying to break this exemplary image,” Dr. Mzannar noted.

He went on to say that in modern history, such a destructive war on infrastructure, children and schools is unprecedented. This blackout of the humanitarian side is to continue the war and destroy this example and try to deter all those who belong to the axis of resistance. They didn’t exclude any means to achieve their futile goal in settling their deterrence power. The Yemeni resistance continues, and all what belongs to the humanitarian face, ending the war and the civilians, will remain undercover.

Making clear how much pressure image circulation can exert on the level of stopping a war, or at least reaching a ceasefire agreement, the media professor used the July 2006 ‘Israeli’ war on Lebanon as an example: “This had previously happened in the July 2006 war on Lebanon. When the Qana Massacre 2006 came to the surface, a ceasefire immediately took place and the ‘Israelis’ were confused. This makes clear how serious the humanitarian side is and the role it plays.”

“Even in the Vietnam War, when the images of the American soldiers killed were published, the American people and public opinion moved on the spot, and deterred the war,” the man added.

As for now, people, who can play major roles, are being totally misled by globalized media that is controlled by a coalition hostile to the real Islam and all that belongs to the axis of resistance.

“Frankly speaking, there is a lot of images published by the Guardian, the BBC, western and French media, for children supposedly from Syria that turned out to be fake. The images rather belonged to kids from Iraq and Palestine.”

Dr. Mzannar stressed that there is deliberate misleading [of public opinion] and an attempt to humanize a war like that in Aleppo, where the humanitarian face is very significant; at the same time, there are counter attempts to totally make absent the aspects of the war on Yemen in favor of continuing the aggression.

Almost two years have passed since the first day of the brutal Saudi aggression, yet the Yemenis are still showing unprecedented resistance, defending their nation and defeating the cruel attacker.

Until then, few are the mirrors that can eye the victim wherever he/she happens to fall, and so many are one-eyed [and] fabricating news, hiding many innocent martyrs, and trumpeting the aggressors’ propaganda by showering public opinion with a lot of fake news.

May the souls of all children rest in peace, the victims of terrorism, media bias, hypocrisy and the polishing of the monster’s image in the eyes of the world.

Source: Al-Ahed News

16-01-2017 | 09:54

وماذبحت ان ذبحت .. ولكن باراك ذبح

 وماذبحت ان ذبحت .. ولكن باراك ذبح

هدية وتذكار أخير في الأيام المعدودة لرجل الأيام المعدودة .. عهد الذبح …..نارام سرجون

 ربما سيحار المؤرخون في الطريقة التي سيعبرون بها عن عهد باراك اوباما.. فلكل رئيس اميريكي انجاز يلتصق به ويصبح صفة ملازمة ترافقه في كتب التاريخ .. وبعضهم صارت له رسوم تلازم أي اشارة اليه .. بعضها على العملة الامريكية وبعضها في المتاحف وبعضهم منحوت في الجبال ..

ولكل نظرتها المتأملة أو الهادئة .. ولكن كيف سينصف المؤرخون باراك اوباما؟؟ وماهو الوصف الذي سيختصره؟؟ هل يليق به لقب “صاحب الربيع العربي”؟؟ أم صديق الاسلاميين الأكبر؟؟ أم الرئيس الذي نشر الذبّيحة في العالم؟؟ وماهي الصورة التي ستعبر عنه وعن عهده الرهيب .. ؟؟ بحيث أن من يراها لايشك أبدا في أن أهم انجاز لهذا الرجل قد لخصته لوحة واحدة ونظرة واحدة .. الرئيس الذي يذبح مبتسما ..

من بين كل اللوحات التي رسمت لأوباما وهو ضاحك أو حائر أو حزين فان هذه اللوحة التي تصوره يهم بذبح الطفل الفلسطيني في حلب على يد ذبيحة (نور الدين زنكي) مع شركائه الاسلاميين الذين تقاسم معهم المذابح والقتل والرعب والسبايا .. هذه اللوحة تعد الأقرب الى الواقع والحقيقة وتلخص كل عهده .. وأعتقد انه يجب أن ترسل له في بطاقة بريدية وان يصنع منها طابع تذكاري يخلده على أهم انجازات تجمعها الصورة .. فهو عهد الذبح .. وعهد ذبح الأطفال تحديدا الذي سيجلب عليه العار في كل كلمة تكتب عنه في كتب التاريخ ..

ففي عهده تم ذبح اكبر عدد من البشر في التاريخ الحديث بحد السكين .. وفي عده تم ذبح أكبر عدد من الأطفال بحد السكين في التاريخ الحديث .. وفي عهده الميمون تدحرج أكبر عدد من رؤوس البشر أمام الكاميرات .. وفي عهده قام التحالف بين نموذج الحرية وايقونة الديمقراطية الغربية وبين داعش والقاعدة والاخوان المسلمين ..

تخيلوا ان ألمانيا النازية وكل قوتها لم تصمد امام انزال النورماندي الذي قاده الامريكيون ووصلت دباباتهم الى برلين في زمن قياسي .. وتخيلوا ان جيش صدام حسين الي كان يعد الجيش الرابع في العالم لم يصمد امام الغزو الاميريكي الا ثلاثة اسابيع .. وحده فقط ابو بكر البغدادي صمد كل هذه السنوات بل وكان يتمدد .. ولايزال الخبراء الامريكيون حائرين في تحديد الزمن اللازم للقضاء عليه .. بين بضع سنوات الى حد ثلاثين سنة .. ولكن الحقيقة هي ان الدواعش هم شركاء أوباما ..

هذه الصورة وهذا الطابع هما ماأحب أن أهدي لباراك أوباما في الايام المعدودات الباقية على رئيس الايام المعدودات .. وان اضعهما في بريده الذي سيفتحه هذا الرجل ذو السجل الأسود في أول صباح خارج البيت الأبيض .. انهما حقا يلخصان زمن أوباما .. زمن ذبح فيه الأطفال بالسكاكين تحت رعايته .. بل ان يده هي التي ذبحت .. وكان الأجدر بكل ذباحي الاسلاميين أن يقولوا قبل كل ذبح عظيم: وماذبحت ان ذبحت .. ولكن باراك ذبح ..

Related Videos

Related Articles

 

UK Arms Sales to Saudi Arabia

Designed by: Nour Fakih

UK Arms Sales to Saudi Arabia

%d bloggers like this: