Gaza Summer

April 28, 2018  /  Gilad Atzmon

 By Enzo Apicella

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SAUDI AIR FORCE POUNDS YEMENI CAPITAL IN ATTEMPT TO ELIMINATE TOP HOUTHI MEMBERS

South Front

28.04.2018

Saudi Air Force Pounds Yemeni Capital In Attempt To Eliminate Top Houthi Members

F-15 fighter jets of the Royal Saudi Air Force

On April 27, warplanes of the Saudi-led coalition conducted a series of heavy airstrikes on several areas in the Yemeni capital of Sanaa, according to local sources.

The collation reportedly targeted the HQ of the Yemeni Ministry of Interior, the al-Daylami airbase, the Presidential Palace, the al-Najdah military camp and several other positions where the Houthis are stationed.

According to the Yemeni al-Masirah TV, the Saudi-led coalition airstrikes on Sanaa injured six civilians, including women and children.

The UAE-based al-Arabiya TV reported that the Saudi-led coalition is trying to target several leaders of the Houthis who have recently arrived to Sanaa to attend the funeral of Houthis top member Saleh al-Samad, who was assassinated by Saudi Arabia on April 19.

These new airstrikes confirm that the Saudi-led coalition is now working to damage the Houthis chain of command by targeting their political and military leaders.

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Britain’s Red Carpet for the Saudi Ruler Is Shameless

Emily Thornberry

07-03-2018 | 15:23

They call diphtheria the “strangling disease”. Parents have to watch helplessly as it slowly clogs the throat and chokes the life out of their children. Thankfully, vaccination has wiped it out in most parts of the world. But not in Yemen. Not this past year. Hundreds of children have been infected, and dozens have died that cruelest of deaths.

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They join the hundreds of other Yemeni children who have died from the worst cholera outbreak in modern history, the thousands who have succumbed to malnutrition, and the untold number of civilians killed by airstrikes on homes, streets, weddings and funerals. This has been the human price of the three-year war in Yemen, in which all parties have shown a callous disregard for life, but where the large majority of civilian deaths lies irrefutably at the door of Saudi Arabia.

Yet today the architect of that Saudi intervention in Yemen – crown prince Mohammad bin Salman – will visit Britain, and will receive the red carpet treatment from the Tory government, as if he were Nelson Mandela. This is the man behind the rolling blockade of Yemen’s ports, preventing the supply of essential food, medicine and fuel to Yemeni civilians, and – on all the available evidence – breaching international law by using starvation as a weapon of war.

The man who, in an equally flagrant breach of the Geneva convention, authorized the destruction of Yemen’s agricultural and food infrastructure in the early stages of the war, with systematic air strikes on farms, dairies, food factories and markets.

Prince Mohammed was rightly enraged at the Houthis’ attempted missile attack on Riyadh in December, but retaliated with a 10-day barrage of indiscriminate air strikes on civilian areas, killing and injuring hundreds, including dozens of children. And while the UK government publicly insists there can be no military solution in Yemen, he has just sacked his most senior generals in an effort to achieve exactly that, and even now plans his assaults on the capital Sanaa and the port of Hodeidah, both of which will drastically escalate the humanitarian crisis. And all that is before we even mention his disgraceful attempts to subvert Lebanon’s democracy, and his reported funding of groups in the Syrian war, both a part of his wider battle against Iran for hegemony in the Middle East.

If it was his regional rival, the supreme leader of Iran, visiting our capital – with his similar record of domestic human rights abuses, regional intervention and alleged support for terror organizations – the UK government would not dream of rolling out the red carpet. So why is it different for the crown prince?

Theresa May tells us it is about our mutual security and strategic interests. Or about Prince Mohammed’s moves to “liberalize” women’s rights, by which she means Saudi Arabia catching up with the rest of the world by promising to allow women to drive cars.

It is all nonsense. As so often, it is about nothing but filthy lucre, and this government’s desperation to plug the hole that will be left in Britain’s trade and growth prospects by May’s refusal to stay in a customs union with the EU after Brexit.

Most nakedly, it is about the shameless bidding war to persuade the crown prince to include the London Stock Exchange in any international listing of the Aramco oil company, billed as the biggest stock market flotation in history.

Most pertinently, it is about the huge increase in arms sold by Britain to Saudi Arabia since the start of the war in Yemen – a trade so shameful that the government now actively encourages applications for “open export licenses” by UK arms firms, precisely to hide what weaponry Riyadh is receiving, and its true value. It’s clear the government doesn’t care a jot about human rights or breaches of the Geneva Convention if there is a chance instead to boost its balance sheet.

Britain is the official pen-holder for the United Nations Security Council on matters relating to Yemen. In October 2016, our government floated a draft resolution calling for a permanent ceasefire in the country to allow for immediate humanitarian relief and talks on a political solution. Prince Mohammed’s acolytes immediately objected, and 17 months on that draft resolution has still not been formally presented to the council. And so his brutal, murderous war continues, without anyone in our government lifting a pen to stop him. Instead, today they fete the crown prince. But millions of us will be saying: not in my name.

Source: The Guardian, Edited by website team

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Breaking: Houthi air defenses shoot down Saudi Tornado warplane over north Yemen

 

BEIRUT, LEBANON (5:27 P.M.) – Houthi rebels have shot down a Saudi warplane whilst it was conducting an attack over northern Yemen. The downed aircraft is of a Western European Cold War-era design.

Reports are emerging that a Panavia Tornado of the Saudi Royal Air Force has been shot down by Houthi air defenses whilst it was on a combat mission in the skies over Saada province in northern Yemen

 

Initial reports of the aircraft downing did not clarify what kind of warplane had been shot out of the sky, leaving mystery as to whether it belonged to the Saudi or Emirati air forces.

 

However, the identification of the aircraft as a Panavia Tornado means that it must belong to the Saudi Royal Air Force since it is the only regional air force to use such a warplane.

At the present time, the type of air defense weapon used by Houthi fighters has not been mentioned.

The Panavia Tornado is a joint British-West German-Italian strike fighter aircraft design originally entering service with Western European air forces in 1979.

 

HOUTHI FORCES DOWNED SAUDI-LED COALITION WARPLANE IN YEMEN’S SA’ADA – REPORTS

On January 7, the Houthis’ air defense forces reportedly shot down a twin-engine Panavia Tornado multirole aircraft belonging to the Saudi-led coalition in the province of Sa’ada in Yemen.

Yemen’s Arabic-language al-Masirah television network reported that the warplane was downed with a surface-to-air missile over Kitaf wa al-Boqe’e district of the province.

| الدفاعات الجوية تسقط طائرة حربية تابعة لقوى العدوان السعودي الأمريكي في أجواء محافظة صعدة

In January 2018, the Saudi-led coalition continued its intense bombing campaign in Yemen targeting military and civilian infrastructure controlled by the Houthis across the country. Considering that the Houthis lack air-defense capabilities every lose of a warplane is a significant blow to the public image of Saudi-led forces.

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Over 700 Yemeni Civilians Killed and Wounded by US-backed Saudi Airstrikes in December

Over 700 Yemeni Civilians Killed and Wounded by US-backed Saudi Airstrikes in December

EDITOR’S CHOICE | 31.12.2017

Over 700 Yemeni Civilians Killed and Wounded by US-backed Saudi Airstrikes in December

Bill Van AUKEN

The US-backed Saudi monarchy and its allied Gulf oil sheikdoms have dramatically escalated their bombing campaign against Yemen, the poorest nation in the Middle East, killing scores of civilians within the last few days.

In the bloodiest of the airstrikes, Saudi warplanes targeted a crowded marketplace in Yemen’s southwestern Taiz province on Tuesday, killing 54 civilians.

While coverage of the bloodbath by the US and Western media has been scarce, Yemen’s Al Masirah television network published photos on its website showing the market’s bombed-out shops and the dismembered remains of slaughtered civilians. It reported that body parts had been thrown hundreds of yards from the blast sites.

Among the dead were at least eight children. Another 32 people were wounded in the bombing, including six children.

On the same day, warplanes attacked a farm in the al-Tuhayta district of Yemen’s western Hodeida province killing an entire family of 14, including women and children.

Yemeni sources reported that Saudi and allied warplanes carried out more than 45 airstrikes on Wednesday targeting several Yemeni cities and killing at least another six civilians, including a family of five whose house was targeted in the port city of Hodeida.

According to the Al Masirah television network the number of Yemenis killed and wounded in Saudi airstrikes since the beginning of December had risen to 600 before the latest round of casualties beginning on Tuesday.

This bloody new phase in the more than 1,000-day-old war by the wealthy and reactionary Arab monarchies against impoverished Yemen is driven by the House of Saud’s frustration over its inability to shift the military stalemate and made possible by the unrestrained support from Riyadh’s Western allies, principally the US and Britain.

The stepped up bombing campaign has come partly in response to the failure of a Saudi-backed coup by the former Yemeni dictator Ali Abdullah Saleh against his erstwhile allies, the Houthi rebel movement. The abortive effort ended in Saleh’s death and the routing of his supporters earlier this month.

Riyadh has also been shaken by the firing of missiles from Yemen targeting both the international airport and the House of Saud’s royal palace. Both missiles were brought down without causing any casualties.

Washington has long relied upon the Saudi monarchy as a pillar of reaction in the Arab world, arming it to the teeth and in the process reaping vast profits for US arms corporations.

During his trip to Saudi Arabia in May, US President Donald Trump signed a $110 billion arms deal with the Saudi regime. While the agreement represented the single largest arms deal in US history, it represented a continuity with the policy pursued by the Democratic administration of Barack Obama, which had struck a $29 billion agreement to sell F-15s the Saudis—representing the previous largest single US arms deal—and had a total of $100 billion worth of weaponry slated for sale to the kingdom.

In addition to providing the warplanes, bombs and missiles being used to slaughter Yemeni civilians, Washington is a direct accomplice and participant in the assault on Yemen, a flagrant war crime that has produced the greatest humanitarian catastrophe on the face of the planet. US Air Force planes are flying refueling missions that keep Saudi fighter bombers in the air, while US intelligence officers are assisting in the targeting of airstrikes and US warships are backing a Saudi sea blockade that is part of a barbaric siege of the country aimed at starving its population into submission.

While an estimated 13,600 civilians have lost their lives to the US-backed Saudi military campaign launched in March of 2015, that death toll has been massively eclipsed by the number of lives lost to hunger and disease resulting from the destruction of basic water and sanitary infrastructure, along with factories, farms, medical facilities and other vital resources, and the blockading of food, medicine and humanitarian supplies.

Almost three years into the war, 21.2 million people, 82 percent of the population, are in need of humanitarian assistance, lacking access to food, fuel and clean water,. An estimated 8 million people are on the brink of starvation, while soaring food prices have placed essential commodities out of reach for all but the wealthiest layers of Yemeni society.

The International Committee of the Red Cross announced last week that the number of cholera cases had topped 1 million, the worst epidemic in modern history, while the country has also been hit by an outbreak of diphtheria, a disease that has been almost entirely eradicated in the rest of the world.

The apocalyptic scale of the human suffering in Yemen has moved some in the West to make timid criticisms of the Saudi regime. Thus, French President Emmanuel Macron reportedly called Saudi King Salman on December 24 to advocate a “complete lifting’ of the blockade of Yemen. Macron made no move, however, to amend the 455 million euro arms deal struck with Riyadh by his predecessor, François Hollande, providing weapons being used to murder Yemeni civilians.

Similarly, the United Nations humanitarian coordinator Jamie McGoldrick pointed to the latest mass casualties resulting from Saudi bombings to condemn the “complete disregard for human life that all parties, including the Saudi-led coalition, continue to show in this absurd war.”

The reality is that the overwhelming majority of deaths have been caused by illegal Saudi aggression. The war, from the standpoint of both Riyadh and Washington, moreover, is not “absurd,” but rather part of a broader regional strategy being pursued by US imperialism to prepare for a military confrontation with Iran, which has emerged as an obstacle to the drive to assert American hegemony over the oil-rich Middle East.

Finally, the New York Times published an editorial Thursday saturated with hypocrisy and deceit. Titled “The Yemen Crucible,” it accuses the Trump administration of applying “a double standard” to the catastrophe in Yemen by denouncing alleged Iranian arms support for the Houthi rebels, while “having nothing bad to say” about the Saudi bombing campaign.

The Times, a mouthpiece for the Democratic Party establishment, raises the possibility that Iran “could be in violation” of a UN Security Council resolution barring it from the export of missiles and other weapons, and guilty of “escalating a crisis” that could lead to war with Saudi Arabia.

Referring to the recent performance of the US ambassador to the United Nations, Nikki Haley, who appeared at a US military hangar in Washington with what was claimed to be debris from an Iranian-supplied missile fire by the Houthi rebels at Riyadh, the newspaper acknowledged that the presentation recalled the “weapons of mass destruction” speech delivered by then US Secretary of State Colin Powell to the UN Security Council in preparation for the US invasion of Iraq.

Of course the Times supported that war of aggression in 2003 and became one of the main propagandists of the “weapons of mass destruction” lie used to justify it.

The editorial utters not a word of criticism of US arms sales to the Saudi regime—much less about the Obama administration’s initiation of Washington’s support for the war on Yemen—and concludes with claims of seeing signs that the Trump administration is exerting “constructive influence on the Saudis.”

These lies and omissions make clear that if and when Washington embarks on a potentially world catastrophic war against Iran, the “newspaper of record” will once again provide its services as a propaganda organ for American militarism.

wsws.org

More than a 1000 Days of War on Yemen [Photos]

30-12-2017 | 14:17

More than a 1000 Days of War on Yemen [Photos]
More than a 1000 Days of War on Yemen [Photos]
More than a 1000 Days of War on Yemen [Photos]
More than a 1000 Days of War on Yemen [Photos]
More than a 1000 Days of War on Yemen [Photos]
More than a 1000 Days of War on Yemen [Photos]
More than a 1000 Days of War on Yemen [Photos]
More than a 1000 Days of War on Yemen [Photos]
More than a 1000 Days of War on Yemen [Photos]
More than a 1000 Days of War on Yemen [Photos]
More than a 1000 Days of War on Yemen [Photos]
More than a 1000 Days of War on Yemen [Photos]
More than a 1000 Days of War on Yemen [Photos]
More than a 1000 Days of War on Yemen [Photos]
More than a 1000 Days of War on Yemen [Photos]
More than a 1000 Days of War on Yemen [Photos]
More than a 1000 Days of War on Yemen [Photos]
More than a 1000 Days of War on Yemen [Photos]
More than a 1000 Days of War on Yemen [Photos]
More than a 1000 Days of War on Yemen [Photos]
More than a 1000 Days of War on Yemen [Photos]
More than a 1000 Days of War on Yemen [Photos]
More than a 1000 Days of War on Yemen [Photos]
More than a 1000 Days of War on Yemen [Photos]
More than a 1000 Days of War on Yemen [Photos]
More than a 1000 Days of War on Yemen [Photos]
More than a 1000 Days of War on Yemen [Photos]
More than a 1000 Days of War on Yemen [Photos]
More than a 1000 Days of War on Yemen [Photos]
More than a 1000 Days of War on Yemen [Photos]
More than a 1000 Days of War on Yemen [Photos]


Source: The Atlantic, Edited by website team

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