Bahrain’s “Jaw” and Saudi’s “Haer” Prisons: Coronavirus Threatens Detainees

8/4/2021

Bahrain’s “Jaw” and Saudi’s “Haer” Prisons: Coronavirus Threatens Detainees

By Staff

What is happening inside Saudi prisons is the same scenario Bahraini detainees are suffering from inside their county’s notorious “Jaw” Prisone due to the authorities’ negligence and denial of medical treatment while the Coronavirus spreads behind bars.

Political prisoners in Saudi Arabia’s “Haer” Prison, in the capital Riyadh, are suffering from Coronavirus symptoms while the prison’s administration denies them medical care.

In this regard, ‘al-Qist’ rights group pointed to reports about the Coronavirus outbreak in the section of political prisoners in “Haer” Prison, relating the reason behind the outbreak in the political section to denying vaccination to the detainees.

The group called on the Saudi regime authorities to guarantee the basic rights of political prisoners and providing them with healthcare, in addition to releasing them.

Earlier in August, a Twitter account belonging to “Political Prisoners” had reported the spread on the virus also inside the Dammam Political Prison.

In parallel, another rights campaign was launched on social media to release political prisoners inside the kingdom amid the outbreak, including the hashtag #BeforeTheCatastrophe, in an effort to rescue them and save their lives.

The campaign also aimed at pressuring for releasing all those who were arbitrarily detained before it is too late when the virus spreads inside cells.

Relatively, rights groups campaigned under another hashtag #DetaineesUnderCoronaDanger to demand the release of all political prisoners.

Saudi Crackdown: 521 Families Threatened With Displacement, Razing Houses in Qatif

Saudi Crackdown: 521 Families Threatened With Displacement, Razing Houses in Qatif

By Staff, Agencies

In the course of the ongoing crackdown against the kingdom’s Shia minority, the Saudi regime plans to displace hundreds of families in the Shia-majority eastern province of Qatif and raze their houses.

Nashet Qatifi, a renowned Saudi human rights activist, said in a post on his Twitter account that the Riyadh government had announced plans for the eviction of more than 521 families from Qatif within 90 days as well as the destruction of their houses in retaliation for their children’s participation in a 2011 anti-regime uprising.

Qatifi said the families had been offered a fee but did not intend to sell or move out of the area as the sum offered was not enough to buy a house.

Local sources in the Shia-majority region confirmed the Saudi plan and said the regime intended to displace hundreds of families from al-Thawra [Revolution] Street in the city center.

Reports said the goal of the Saudi regime was to erase any signs and memories of the demonstrations in 2011, especially al-Thawra Street, which had become a symbol of the revolution and protests in Qatif.

A similar incident took place in the al-Musawara neighborhood of Qatif in 2017, and many houses were destroyed by bulldozers. In November last year, Saudi officials also leveled to the ground a Shia Muslim mosque south of al-Awamia Town in Qatif.

Saudi Arabia’s Eastern Province has been the scene of peaceful demonstrations since February 2011. Protesters have been demanding reforms, freedom of expression, the release of political prisoners, and an end to economic and religious discrimination against the oil-rich region.

The protests have been met with a heavy-handed crackdown by the regime, whose forces have ramped up measures across the province.

Ever since Mohammed bin Salman became Saudi Arabia’s de facto leader in 2017, the kingdom has ramped up arrests of activists, bloggers, intellectuals, and others perceived as political opponents, showing almost zero tolerance for dissent even in the face of international condemnations of the crackdown.

Muslim scholars have been executed, women’s rights campaigners have been put behind bars and tortured, and freedom of expression, association, and belief continue to be denied.

Al-Saud Retreat! Death Sentences for 3 Minors Commuted to 10 Years in Jail

Al-Saud Retreat! Death Sentences for 3 Minors Commuted to 10 Years in Jail

By Staff, Agencies

In the kingdom of death, death penalties given to three young protesters in Saudi Arabia when they were minors were commuted to ten years in Jail.

One of the prisoners, Ali al-Nimr, was sentenced to death in the country’s Eastern Province in February 2012 when he was 17 years old. He is the nephew of Sheikh Nimr al-Nimr, the famous Saudi cleric who had called for reforms and was executed by the Riyadh regime in January 2016.

The Specialized Criminal Court had sentenced to death Nimr along with Dawood al-Marhoun and Abdullah al-Zaher, 17 and 15, after they were arrested.

Saudi Arabia’s state-backed Human Rights Commission said on Sunday that Nimr’s sentence, who has served more than nine years in jail since his arrest, has been commuted, adding that the two others’ were commuted in November 2020.

In all three cases, it added, time served would apply and they are set to be freed in 2022.

“Freedom soon, God willing,” Nimr’s mother said in a Facebook post celebrating the news.

The death sentences of Nimr, Marhoun, Zaher and two other juvenile offenders have not been revoked yet.

Rights groups who follow the cases closely told Reuters in January that one of the five has appealed. Eight others originally detained as minors still face charges that could lead to their execution.

Anti-death penalty charity Reprieve says Riyadh should ensure the decree is applied to all juvenile offenders.

“True change isn’t about a few high-profile cases; it means making sure no-one is ever sentenced to death for a childhood ‘crime’ again in Saudi Arabia,” said Reprieve director Maya Foa.

According to a Saudi Human Rights Commission [HRC] report in January, Saudi Arabia executed a record 185 people in 2019; the regime reduced the number by 85% in 2020.

In a statement in October, Human Rights Watch called on Saudi Arabia to stop the imminent execution of eight men charged with activities related to a wave of anti-government protests while they were under the age of 18.

Al-Qatif, The Prey of the House of Saud

Al-Qatif, The Prey of the House of Saud

By Latifa Al-Housseiny

Beirut – Saudi authorities are continuing to pursue a relenting campaign of harassment against the Eastern Province in general and al-Qatif in particular despite having their past practices and arbitrary violations exposed.

A few weeks ago, the security services launched a direct assault on prominent religious clerics in Al-Qatif. The residents in the governorate are accustomed to the recklessness of the regime and its unjustified, illegal, and illogical arrests. Each time, the House of Saud reinforces the narrative that it’s the seed of oppression and tyranny and against justice and fairness.

Their routine about their supposed respect for human rights is comical. It doesn’t convince any party that advocates for international humanitarian standards or any organization that considers freedom of opinion and expression its goal and slogan.

According to sources from inside al-Qatif, the abrupt security operations against the people and prominent figures in the region appear never ending.

Speaking to al-Ahed News, the sources reported a number of recent arrests and incursions in al-Qatif and al-Ahsa. They documented around 33 operations involving safe houses and rest houses. Meanwhile, 34 arrests were made, including scholars as well as young men and women through checkpoints and mass summonses.

Our sources indicate that 35 prisoners were arbitrarily detained for purely political reasons. They were tried in secret without any details of their judicial sessions being made public. This as their relatives were deprived of any information that might reassure them and give them a clear picture of their fate inside the prison cells.

Three women are among these oppressed prisoners. They are housed in a detention center after security forces stormed their homes. One woman belongs to the Suleiman al-Dakhil family that hails from Tarout Island. The other two women are members of the Abdel-Al Al-Tarouti family that hails from the Umm al-Jazm neighborhood.

The religious scholars Sayyed Khader Al-Awami, Sheikh Abbas Al-Saeed, and Sayyed Hashem Al-Shakhs share the same fate. They were kidnapped in broad daylight, and ambiguity surrounds the reasons for their imprisonment and their situation. Only one thing is known – they are held in the Mabahith prison in Dammam.

As for the latest information regarding the Husseini orator Mohamed Boujbara, who was arrested along with 14 others for filming a video in Barr Al-Asfar in Al-Ahsa on the occasion of Arbaeen, our sources indicate that he was transferred to the Dammam prison.

One of the grimmer developments involves the demolition of the Imam Hussein [AS] Mosque in Al-Zara, south of Al-Awamiyah. Authorities tore down the mosque a few days ago.

The move is seen as a dangerous escalation that would be interpreted as an abhorrent targeting of everyone who raised their voices against the House of Saud, especially since martyr Sheikh Nimr Baqir al-Nimr led the prayers there and guided worshippers to truth and to ward off injustice.

So far, the daily incursions have affected 15 towns in the al-Qatif Governorate, resulting in an increase in the number of detainees to more than 200 from al-Awamiyah alone. This only portends the worst as long as the Saudi leadership ignores human rights appeals and is concerned only with stifling freedoms.

Saudi Arabia’s abominable human rights record

November 30, 2020 – 11:33

By Stephen Lendman

Stephen Lendman is an American award-winning author, syndicated columnist, and Research Associate of the Centre for Research on Globalization (CRG).

Like the U.S., Israel, and other rogue states, the Saudis operate by their own rules in flagrant violation of international laws, norms, and standards. It’s the world’s head-chopping/public whippings capital. Anyone can be targeted for exercising free expression, human rights activism, or other forms of dissent against despotic rule.

They’re also vulnerable for not praying at designated times, improper dress code, non-observance of gender segregation, and other nonconformity with Wahhabi extremism.

Its documented high crimes include state-sponsored murder, torture, arbitrary arrests, and detentions, supporting ISIS and other terrorist groups, partnering in U.S. regional wars, banning free elections, denying due process and judicial fairness, prohibiting religious freedom, human trafficking, kidnappings, committing crimes of war and against humanity, along with virtually every other rule of law breach imaginable.

In mid-November, the London Daily Mail reported the following: “Saudi interrogators forced jailed women’s rights activists to perform sex acts, hung them from ceilings and ‘tortured’ them with electric shocks,” citing a report, titled: “A Stain on World Leaders and the G20 Summit in Saudi Arabia: The shameful detention and torture of Saudi women.”

The report explained that in May 2018, “10 human rights defenders who had successfully campaigned” to end the prohibition against women driving were arrested and detained. 

Weeks later, nine more arrests and detentions followed. Targeted individuals were activists for women’s rights in the kingdom. A few are males who support gender equality were also arrested. Most individuals targeted remain detained. It was learned that they were “subjected to torture, inhuman and degrading conditions of detention, solitary confinement, and unfair trial processes.”

In the report, human rights lawyer Baroness Helena Kennedy called on G20 nations to boycott the virtual November 21-22 Riyadh summit until wrongfully detained women are free. Other charges included forcing them to watch pornography, along with performing other sexual acts on interrogators.

One detained woman was reportedly told: “I’ll do whatever I like to you, and then I’ll dissolve you and flush you down the toilet.” Another woman said Saudi King Salman’s younger brother, Prince Khalid bin Salman, oversaw what went on, at one point saying:  “I can do anything I like to you.”

Commenting on her report, Baroness Kennedy said horrendous abuses endured by detained women in the kingdom wouldn’t be tolerated in “decent nation(s),” adding: “Being expected to deliver for interrogators, what that has done to the soul of a woman is so terrible.”

Saudi abuses against nonviolent activist women are typical of how their ruling authorities always operate — showing contempt for the rights of ordinary people, tolerating no dissent.

Crown prince Mohammad bin Salman (MBS) is the kingdom’s torturer assassin-in-chief. He personally signed off on the October 2018 brutal murder and dismemberment of Jamal Khashoggi in the kingdom’s Istanbul consulate. In 2017, he arrested and detained hundreds of royal family members and Saudi businessmen. Held under house arrest at Riyadh’s Ritz-Carlton hotel, they were forced to pay tens or hundreds of billions of dollars in cash and assets to the regime for release — MBS grand theft on the phony pretext of rooting out corruption. 

He consolidated power by eliminating rivals and terrorizing potential ones. Royal family members, Saudi businessmen, and others in the kingdom not willing to affirm loyalty to his rule risk arrest, detention, torture, and elimination.

Since appointed crown prince in June 2017 — gaining power because his of father’s mental and physical deterioration — he’s ruthlessly gone all-out to solidify it unchallenged. He likely OK’s sexual and other torture of detained women activists.

UN secretary-general Guterres is largely silent about Western, Israeli and Saudi high crimes, serving their interests instead of condemning them. As long as Saudi Arabia is oil-rich, its wealth used to invest in Western countries and buy their weapons, as well as partnering in their regional wars, their ruling authorities will turn a blind eye to the worst of kingdom high crimes.
 

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Saudi Crackdown: Unabated Arbitrary Arrests, Oppression against People of Qatif

Saudi Crackdown: Unabated Arbitrary Arrests, Oppression against People of Qatif

By Staff

Out of the blue, without any reason, the Saudi regime security personnel detained religious scholars Sheikh Abbas al-Said and Sayyed Khodo al-Awami after raiding their homes in the town of Awamiah, in Saudi Arabia’s Qatif eastern province.

According to the Deputy Chief of the European Saudi Organization for Human Rights, Adel al-Said, who is the brother of Sheikh Abbas, the two detainees have been repeatedly investigated over the past ten years. However, their arrest was probably aimed at causing fear and terror among everybody.

In parallel, the Saudi regime authorities reported that Ashura mourning reciter Mohammad Bou Jbarah was transferred to the Dammam General Prison where he is set to be tried along with eight other youths who were arrested on October 4th for filming an artwork commemorating Imam Hussein’s [AS] Arbaeen anniversary.

According to Mirat al-Jazeera website, the nine men spent three weeks inside the Dammam Investigations Prison without being allowed any visit, and families and lawyers contacts.

The website also uncovered that the Saudi regime authorities are practicing a new arbitrary policy that violates the privacy of the released detainees, in which the prison’s administration chase them with electronic bracelets they have to wear so it can spy on them. This comes as a revenge for their endurance in front of the jailer, in which the regime insists to keep them under surveillance despite achieving their freedom.

Relatively, the Saudi regime sticks to violating the human rights of the people in Qatif and al-Ahsaa without any deterrence. It is also clinging to its dark record of torturing detainees behind bars and after their release to lay more sufferings upon them and increase their psychological stress via different invented and individual methods of taking revenge and practicing oppression.

رئيس نتفلكس: السعودية سمحت بعرض أفلام جنسية مقابل حذف حلقة تنتقد ابن سلمان بشدة

Under the Pretext of Coronavirus, Saudi Authorities Remove Ashura Flags in Qatif

Under the Pretext of Coronavirus, Saudi Authorities Remove Ashura Flags in Qatif

By Staff

As part of the continued security pressures practiced by the Saudi authorities against the people of Qatif while commemorating the Ashura mourning ceremonies, security forces removed all black Ashura flags raised in the Tarout Island graveyard.

The action represented a blatant provocation for the Ashura mourning organizers who, according to Qatif local sources speaking to al-Ahed, are subjected to unprecedented tightening under the pretext of the Coronavirus.

According to information obtained by al-Ahed, intelligence officers were granted ultimate authorities to intervene and impose their restrictions as part of the personal behavior and intervening in the details of the mourning ceremonies.

Donations made for supporting the ceremonies were totally banned. Additionally, names, contacts and civil records of the Ashura lecturers were collected by the authorities.

Local sources told al-Ahed that the authorities also prevented Ashura mourning organizers from raising the voice of mourning inside Husseiniyas and family gatherings.

The same sources added that the imposed measures were very strict and aimed at controlling all Ashura ceremonies.

Shia Muslims across the world commemorate the martyrdom anniversary of third Shia Imam Hussein bin Ali [AS] and his family members and companions who stood up to injustice and fought in the battle of Karbala in the year 61 Hijri. The ten-day commemoration begins on the first of Muharram, the first month of the Islamic year.

Amnesty Urges Saudi To Release Female Activists

Source

By Staff, Agencies

Amnesty Urges Saudi To Release Female Activists

Amnesty International called on Saudi Arabian authorities to immediately release women human rights activists, including those who are “being punished for daring to drive.”

The kingdom on Thursday marked the second anniversary of the end of the ban on women driving.

“It’s been almost two years since the Saudi authorities detained Loujain al-Hathloul, Iman al-Nafjan, Aziza al-Yousef, and a group of Saudi women activists simply for demanding equality and defending human rights in the kingdom,” the group’s UK chapter said in a statement.

“For the first three months of their detention, several of the women activists endured torture, physical abuse and other forms of ill-treatment when they were held incommunicado and in solitary confinement with no access to their families or lawyers.”

Up until June 24, 2018, Saudi Arabia had been the only country in the world to prevent women from driving, and even jailed some who defied the ban.

Amnesty UK has launched a “Beep for freedom” campaign in support of the persecuted women’s rights defenders.

The campaign involves supporters sharing photos of themselves behind the wheel of a car or sharing the campaign’s “Beep for Freedom” car horn symbol, with an appeal to the Saudi authorities to “immediately and unconditionally” release the activists and drop all charges against them.

Dissidents in the conservative country are often arbitrarily detained without charge or trial.

Leading Saudi Activist Dies in Detention: Amnesty International

Leading Saudi Activist Dies in Detention: Amnesty International

By Staff, Agencies

A leading activist serving an 11-year prison sentence has died in detention in Saudi Arabia, Amnesty International said, highlighting the kingdom’s human rights record.

Abdullah al-Hamid, 69, died after a stroke in his prison cell earlier this month, according to multiple rights groups, including Amnesty International.

“Dr. Hamid was a fearless champion for human rights in Saudi Arabia,” said Lynn Maalouf, Middle East research director at Amnesty.

“Our thoughts are with his family and friends, who for the past eight years had been deprived of his presence as a result of the state’s inhumane repression.”

“He, and all other prisoners of conscience in Saudi Arabia, should never have been in jail in the first place,” Maalouf added.

Hamid was a founding member of the rights group the Saudi Civil and Political Rights Association [ACPRA] and was sentenced to prison in March 2013, the rights groups said.

He faced multiple charges, including “breaking allegiance” to the Saudi ruler, “inciting disorder” and seeking to disrupt state security, Amnesty explained.

Other ACPRA members have also been imprisoned in the past, including another co-founder, Mohammad al-Qahtani, who was jailed for 10 years in 2013, Amnesty said.

Saudi Arabia has long faced international criticism over its human rights record. That criticism has grown since Mohammed bin Salman was named crown prince and heir to the Saudi throne in June 2017.

The murder of the Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi in October 2018 and the increased repression of dissidents have overshadowed so-called efforts by the prince to modernize the economy and society.

“ISIS Has Nothing Over Saudi Arabia”: Kingdom Reaches 800 Beheadings Under Salman

Profile picture for user Tyler Durden

by Tyler Durden

Thu, 04/23/2020 – 22:45

Another grim milestone was reached this week, but not on the COVID-19 front. Human rights monitors have recorded that Saudi Arabia has carried out its 800th execution since King Salman bin Abdulaziz (and by extension MbS) began his rule five years ago — most being in the form of the kingdom’s ‘favored’ beheadings.

The British nonprofit Reprieve said the kingdom’s rate of execution in Saudi Arabia has doubled since 2015 when King Salman took over following the death of his half-brother, King Abdullah. Of course, as Salman’s health was reportedly increasingly fragile from the start of his rule, it’s widely believed crown prince Mohammed bin Salman (MbS) has remained the true power and day-to-day decision maker.

King Salman attending a 2016 ‘sword dance’ ceremony, via Saudi Gazette.

MbS was widely hailed as a ‘reformer’ – among other things promising to greatly reduce the number of annual executions, which include the ghastly methods of beheading and crucifixion. But this is nowhere near the reality.

So much for empty talk of ‘reform’, ‘modernization’ and ‘progress’ – as Middle East Eye reports of Reprieve’s findings:

By comparison, Saudi authorities executed 423 people between 2009 and 2014.

Currently, there are at least 13 juvenile defendants on death row – including Ali al-Nimr, Dawood al-Marhoon and Abdullah al-Zaher – who are “at imminent risk of execution”, Reprieve and the European Saudi Organisation for Human Rights said.

Saudi Arabia executed six young men last year who were children at the time of their alleged offences, in a mass execution of 37 people. 

Riyadh’s concerns no doubt now lie far elsewhere regarding the prior MbS rhetoric of reform, given the kingdom is now scrambling to bring oil prices back up after the historic global price crash this week. 

Reform vs. Reality — public beheadings as a form of political suppression: 

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Apparently ‘Chop Chop Square’ was busy as usual even amid the more pressing crisis of the accelerating oil glut. As of only last week, Amnesty International recorded 789 executions under the king, which only days later grew to 800.

As one Newsweek headline years ago aptly observed“when it comes to beheadings, ISIS has nothing over Saudi Arabia.”

Amnesty International Calls on Saudi Authorities to Release Prisoner of Conscience Has Been in A Coma

Source

2020-04-19


Amnesty International called on The Saudi Arabian authorities must immediately release Dr Abdullah al-Hamid, a prisoner of conscience who remains detained despite being in coma and in critical condition early April.

“It is heartbreakingly cruel that Dr Abdullah al-Hamid remains in detention, even while in a coma,” said Lynn Maalouf, Amnesty International’s Middle East Research Director. “Dr al-Hamid, and all other prisoners of conscience in Saudi Arabia, should never have been in jail in the first place. All those imprisoned solely for peacefully exercising their human rights must be immediately and unconditionally released.

The organization also called on the authorities to consider taking into account the immediate release of elderly prisoners, thoe with current health conditions, who are still at risk of contracting Covid-19, as well as all who are still awaiting trial.

In March 2012, Dr al-Hamid and Mohammad al-Qahtani were arrested and interrogated regarding their work with ACPRA and their peaceful activism. In March 2013, they were sentenced to 11 and 10 years in prison respectively, on charges of “breaking allegiance to the ruler”, “questioning the integrity of officials”, “seeking to disrupt security and inciting disorder by calling for demonstrations”, and “instigating international organizations against the Kingdom”.

Dr. Abdullah Al-Hamid, a prominent human rights activist, is serving a 11-year prison sentence for his peaceful activity and suffering from high blood pressure. The doctor told him, three months ago, that he needed to have heart surgery in the coming months, and prison authorities have threatened him that if he is told His family, on his health, will cut his contact with his family, and among the prisoners of conscience still in detention in the Kingdom are many prominent women’s rights activists, including Lujain al-Hathloul.

It is reported that conditions in many of Saudi Arabia’s overcrowded prisons, like its counterpart in Bahrain, greatly increase the risk of the spread of Covid-19 virus. Amnesty International has previously expressed concern about the authorities’ failure to provide adequate medical care in the country’s prisons.

Executions Double In Saudi Arabia under King Salman

Executions Double In Saudi Arabia under King Salman

By Staff, Agencies

Saudi Arabia carried out its 800th execution last week, marking an almost two-fold increase in the use of the medieval practice since King Salman assumed power in 2015, a rights group warned.

Reprieve, a UK-based non-profit organization, alarmed in a report on Tuesday that the Riyadh regime last week beheaded Abdulmohsin Humood Abdullah al-Ghamdi, a national accused of committing murder, marking the 800th execution in the Arab country since Salman assumed power in January 2015, following the death of his half-brother, King Abdullah.

The report said that executions had almost doubled in just five years in comparison with the 423 executions conducted in Saudi Arabia from 2009 through 2014.

Reprieve added that the Saudi regime had executed 186 people in 2019 alone, 37 of whom were killed in one mass execution on April 23 last year. It said six of the men beheaded during the mass execution had been juveniles at the time of their purported offenses.

Of those who had been executed in 2019, at least 58 people were foreign nationals targeted for preaching Shia Islam, which the Saudi regime considers a crime, the report said, adding that others were executed last year for allegedly participating in or inciting political demonstrations.

Reprieve also criticized Crown Prince Mohammad bin Salman, who is regarded as the de facto ruler of the kingdom, for not keeping his word to limit the number of executions as part of what he initially claimed would be “reforms” in the highly-conservative kingdom. “The reality is far from that statement,” Reprieve said.

According to the report, the increase in the number of executions during the past five years is partly due to the number of people accused of politically-motivated crimes under Salman.

“For all the rhetoric of reform and modernization, Saudi Arabia is still a country where speaking out against the king can get you killed,” said director of Reprieve, Maya Foa.

In January 2016, Saudi authorities executed Shia cleric Sheikh Nimr Baqir al-Nimr, who was an outspoken critic of the Riyadh regime, along with 46 other men on “terrorism” charges.

Saudi Arabia has stepped up the politically-motivated arrest, prosecution, and conviction of peaceful dissident writers and human rights campaigners, particularly in the country’s Shia-populated Eastern Province.

Over the past years, Riyadh has also redefined its anti-terrorism laws to target activism.

Citizens of Saudi Arabia Pay their Lives as MBS Advances in His NEOM City

By Staff

The Saudi regime is sending its police to besiege its own citizens, then force them out of their houses to remain homeless, landless and even lifeless.

Citizens of Saudi Arabia Pay their Lives as MBS Advances in His NEOM City

One example is Saudi citizen Ahmed Mahmoud al-Huwaiti, alias “Abu Anas”. The man, who belongs to the al-Huwaitat tribe, which lives in the village of al-Khraibah northern Medina, was killed in daylight by the Saudi regime’s police, while he was documenting his last moments using his phone’s camera. The deceased man was besieged inside his home as he refused to leave his land.

“Abu Anas” has published, before the police killed him, several videos that expose the criminal acts. He also expected that he will be killed by the police, and he has lamented his own self before he was martyred.

Displacement is a suffering that has long been randomly imposed by the Saudi authorities against the people they select upon their preferences. This often forces others to obey any rule not to face a similar fate. It also widens the gap between the state and the citizens with every such attack.

It was reported by “Anu Anas” shortly before his death that any citizen who doesn’t hand his house will be forcibly dealt with by the intelligence and emergency forces.

The man, who possesses a legitimate instrument that shows his ownership of the house and the land near it, has repeatedly warned of similar acts.

People of that area are forced to evacuate their shelters as part of the implementation of Saudi crown prince Mohammad Bin Salman’s [MBS] so-called NEOM project.

ISRAELI COMPANIES TALKING TO SAUDI ARABIA ABOUT $500B. 'SMART CITY'
ISRAELI COMPANIES TALKING TO SAUDI ARABIA ABOUT $500B. ‘SMART CITY’

In the course of implementing NEOM, MBS is displacing original landowners to build the city he has announced. MBS’ city stretches over the Saudi kingdom’s northwestern area, and includes lands inside Egyptian and Jordanian borders.

Bahrainis Mark Ninth Anniversary of Revolution

 February 14, 2020

http://program.almanar.com.lb/episode/97704 Video link

Bahrainis marked Friday the ninth anniversary of their revolution in face the Manama regime which resorted to the worst forms of suppression against the peaceful protesters who have sought freedom and democracy.

During a conference held in Beirut, the deputy chief of Al-Wefaq Islamic Association Sheikh Hussein Al-Dihi delivered a speech which called on the Bahrainis to preserve the peaceful protests till reaching the revolution’s goals despite all the regime arbitrary acts.

Source: Al-Manar English Website

Bahrainis Mark 4th Anniversary of Popular Uprising

Alwaght-The Bahraini people have taken to the streets across the country to mark the fourth anniversary of the popular uprising amid a heavy-handed crackdown by Al Khalifa regime forces to curb the undying anti-government rallies, Press TV reports.

Bahrainis are marking the anniversary of their February 14, 2011 revolution amid soaring tensions in the Persian Gulf country and heavy clashes between police and protesters.

Security forces once again on Saturday fired tear gas to disperse anti-regime demonstrators in Sitra Island, northeast of the Bahraini capital of Manama.

On Friday, people took to the streets and staged mass demonstrations in Manama and several towns and villages across the kingdom, including Sitra, Belad al-Qadeem, and Diraz on the eve of the anniversary of the revolution.

Police fired tear gas and rubber bullets to disperse protesters in Manama while clashes also broke out in several other towns.

Bahrainis have been holding numerous protests in the past few days to mark the fourth anniversary of their uprising against the ruling Al Khalifa regime.

Demonstrators are seeking the downfall of the Al Khalifa regime and establishment of a democratically elected government.

The protesters also called for the release of the main opposition leader, Sheikh Ali Salman, and other political prisoners.  Salman has been under arrest since December last year on charges of inciting regime change.  He denies the charges.

Amnesty International on Friday called on Bahraini officials to observe the citizens’ rights to freedom of expression and assembly ahead of the revolution’s anniversary.

“The Bahraini authorities must uphold the rights to freedom of peaceful expression and assembly and rein in security forces as thousands of protesters are taking to the streets ahead of the fourth anniversary of the uprising in Bahrain,” the rights group said in a statement.

Amnesty also slammed Bahraini authorities for the arrest of a number of opposition figures and activists, including al-Wefaq National Islamic Society Secretary General Sheikh Salman and prominent Bahraini human rights activist Nabeel Rajab.

Since mid-February 2011, thousands of anti-regime protesters have held numerous demonstrations on the streets of Bahrain, calling for the Al Khalifa family to relinquish power.

On March 14, 2011, troops from Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates invaded the country to assist the Bahraini government in its crackdown on peaceful protesters.

Scores of Bahrainis have been killed and hundreds of others injured and arrested in the ongoing crackdown on peaceful demonstrations.

Remembering Sheikh Nimr Al-Nimr

Designed by: Nour Fakih

Saudi Crackdown: Two Opposition Activists Martyred As Regime Forces Storm Dammam

By Staff, Agencies

At least two political dissidents were martyred in Saudi Arabia when regime forces raided a village in the kingdom’s oil-rich and Shia-populated Eastern Province, in the course of the crackdown led by Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman [MBS] against pro-democracy campaigners, Muslim preachers and intellectuals continues unabated in the country.

Local sources, requesting anonymity, said security forces stormed into al-Anoud neighborhood of the provincial capital of Dammam, located about 400 kilometers east of the capital Riyadh, on Wednesday afternoon.

The sources added that two opposition figures were fatally shot in the process.

On December 2, Saudi Arabia’s Specialized Criminal Court sentenced five anti-regime dissidents from Eastern Province to death.

The London-based and Arabic-language Nabaa television news network, citing social media activists, reported at the time that the Riyadh-based tribunal passed the verdicts against Mahmoud Issa al-Qallaf, a resident of Ash Shweikah neighborhood in Qatif region, and four others from the town of al-Awamiyah, who were identified as Mohammed Ali al-Aqili, Ahmed Mohammed Abu Abdullah and his brother Amir, and Musa Jaafar al-Samkhan.

On September 12, the rights group Prisoners of Conscience, which is an independent non-governmental organization advocating human rights in Saudi Arabia, announced in a post on its official Twitter page that the Specialized Criminal Court had sentenced Shia cleric and human rights activist Sheikh Mohammed al-Habib to 12 years in prison and imposed a travel ban on him.

Sheikh Habib had been recently released after three years of arbitrary detention.

Saudi Arabia has stepped up politically-motivated arrests, prosecution and conviction of peaceful dissident writers and human rights campaigners.

Saudi officials have also intensified crackdown in the country’s Eastern Province.

Eastern Province has been the scene of peaceful demonstrations since February 2011. Protesters have been demanding reforms, freedom of expression, the release of political prisoners, and an end to economic and religious discrimination against the oil-rich region.

The protests, however, have been met with a heavy-handed crackdown by the regime, with its forces increasing security measures across the province.

HRW Highlights «Deepening Repression» Under Saudi’s MBS

HRW Highlights «Deepening Repression» Under Saudi’s MBS

By Staff, Agencies

Human Rights Watch says Saudi de facto ruler Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman’s [MBS] rise to power two years ago has been accompanied by “deepening repression and abusive practices” across the kingdom.

In a new report released on Monday, the New York-based group said activists, clerics and other perceived critics of the Saudi crown prince continue to be arbitrarily detained more than a year after the killing of the dissident journalist Jamal Khashoggi by Saudi agents in the kingdom’s consulate in Turkey.

The report noted the detention of dissidents and harassment of their families was not a new phenomenon in the kingdom history, but the wave of repression since late 2017 had been distinguished by new repressive measures.

“Detaining citizens for peaceful criticism of the government’s policies or human rights advocacy is not a new phenomenon in Saudi Arabia,” it said.

“But what has made the post-2017 arrest waves notable and different, however, is the sheer number and range of individuals targeted over a short period of time as well as the introduction of new repressive practices.”

The crackdown under MBS began in September 2017 with the arrest of dozens of critics and rights activists in what was widely interpreted as an attempt to crush dissent.

The crown prince has also been on a modernization drive with reforms including allowing women over 21 to obtain passports and travel abroad without the permission of a male guardian.

But these reforms have belied a “darker reality,” according to the report, including the mass arrests of women’s rights activists, a number of whom have allegedly been sexually assaulted and suffered torture including whipping and electric shocks.

The report also said those reforms were a smokescreen for the ongoing detention of dozens of dissidents, some allegedly tortured in custody.

“Important social reforms enacted under Prince Mohammed have been accompanied by deepening repression and abusive practices meant to silence dissidents and critics.”

According to the report, the new repressive measure by MBS included extorting financial assets in exchange for a detainee’s freedom, a tool used against dozens of business people and royal family members arbitrarily held at the Ritz-Carlton hotel in Riyadh in November 2017.

Hundreds of elite princes and businessmen were then detained in what was billed as a move against corruption that was draining state coffers.

HRW cited reports that Saudi Arabia has used surveillance technologies to hack into the online accounts of the regime critics and infected their mobile phones with spyware.

The report also highlighted a lack of accountability for those responsible for Khashoggi’s murder, a crime MBS has sought to distance himself from.

A UN report released in June said there was “credible evidence” MBS and other senior Saudi officials were liable for Khashoggi’s killing, which the kingdom has characterized as a rogue operation by its agents.

But the international criticism has failed to halt a campaign against perceived dissidents inside the kingdom, according to the HRW report, with waves of arrests carried out against women’s rights activists and their allies this year, including the writer Khadijah al-Harbi, who was pregnant at the time of her detention.

اليمن شريك بالقوة في وظيفتين خليجيتين

 

أغسطس 3, 2019

د. وفيق إبراهيم

الدولة اليمنيّة في صنعاء تزداد قوة مقابل خسارة «الدولة الوهميّة اليمنيّة» في السعودية لآخر إمكاناتها، وهي إمكانات كانت تستمدها من العدوان السعودي ـ الإماراتي على اليمن المستمر منذ سنين خمس.

أما الأسباب فباتت واضحة وهي أن تراجع العدوان الخارجي وحلفه اليمني الداخلي، ليس لخسارة مواقع او معارك، بل لفقدان وظائف استراتيجية لا تزال تشكّل حتى الآن الأسباب الأساسية للاهتمام الغربي بجزيرة العرب والخليج.

للايضاح فإن بلدان الخليج تبيع نفطاً وتشتري كل شيء تقريباً باستثناء البلح، ما أنتج معادلة تقوم على أن الغرب يُنقِّب عن النفط بواسطة شركاته التي تعالجه وتصدره الى العالم الغربي وبعض البلدان الآسيوية والأفريقية المستهلكة، ما أنتج علاقة عميقة بين نظام اقتصادي غربي وسلطات خليجية تأسست على سطو غربي متجذّر ثنائي الحركة: النفط من الخليج وتصدير البضائع الغربية وكل الأنواع الى الخليج، فتطوّر هذه العلاقة بين الطرفين الى نظام حماية متكامل المواصفات والشروط مع دفع البدل والاتاوات والضحية بالطبع هم سكان جزيرة العرب.

لكن الاستثناء على هذه القاعدة كان اليمن. فالسعودية بذلت إمكانات كبيرة منذ ثلاثينيات القرن الماضي لمنعه من الاستقرارين السياسي والاجتماعي، وحرمانه من إمكانية استثمار موارده الاقتصادية. وهذا واضح في السياسات السعودية التي لا تزال مستمرّة في اليمن منذ سبعة عقود وأكثر.

الأمر الذي يكشف أن العدوان السعودي الإماراتي الحالي المدعوم عربياً وغريباً وإسرائيلياً عليه هو استمرار للسياسات السعودية التاريخية ضد هذا البلد بدعم غربي مفتوح.

أما أسباب هذه العدوانيّة السعودية التاريخيّة، المتواصلة، فهو رفض آل سعود ليمنٍ مستقرّ فيه غلبة سكانيّة ويستطيع العيش من موارد غير نفطيّة متحكّماً برأس جزيرة العرب، ولديه علاقات نسب وانتماء مع معظم القبائل في السعودية وعُمان، وأهله مولعون بحب المعرفة والعلم والإحساس العميق بوحدة النسب مع الجوار في المنطقة العربية.

لذلك فالعدوان السعودي الحالي على اليمن، يحمل هذه العدوانية المذكورة، مضافة إليها محاولة منع اليمن من التعاون مع السياسات العربية والإقليمية المعادية للنفوذ الأميركي وبالتالي السعودي ـ الاسرائيلي.

لمزيد من التوضيح فإن الهجوم السعودي ـ الإماراتي بدأ بالدخول الى اليم منذ 2014 مستهدفاً السيطرة على كامل بقاعه وسط حملة إعلامية، بأن أسبوعين فقط كافيان لإسقاط الدولة في صنعاء، وهذا كلام موثق قاله ولي العهد السعودي محمد بن سلمان زاعماً أن قواته تريد تحرير اليمن من أهله.

الآن وبعد خمس سنوات يطأطئ بن سلمان رأسه من دون توضيح أسباب تراجع قواته المدعومة بالمرتزقة والسلاح والحصار وكل شيء تقريباً.

هذا مقابل صورة معاكسة، ليمن أصلي قاتل العدوان باحترافيّة تاريخيّة في إطار خطة يتواصل صعودها لتحقيق الهدف الكامل وهو تحرير البلاد من العدوان. وهذا يؤدي تلقائياً إلى ولادة دور إقليمي لليمن بدأ يتشكّل منذ الآن.

كيف تتبلور جهادية اليمن نحو التحرّر وتطوير الدور؟

عرفت العقلية التاريخية اليمنية أن إمكانات العدوان على بلادها كبيرة جداً بدعم إقليمي ودولي غير مسبوق فطبقت مفهوم حرب «الغوار الشعبية» بتراجع متعمّد أمام السعوديين والإماراتيين حتى صدَّق هؤلاء أنهم قاب قوسين أو أدنى من السيطرة على كل اليمن، وتبين أن دولة صنعاء تراجعت لتفكيك زخم المهاجمين وذلك بتراجع متعمّد ما أدّى إلى انتشارهم على مساحات يمنية واسعة فضعفوا.

هذا ما جرى بالعدوان الذي وزّع جيوشه على مئات آلاف الكيلومترات المربعة لضمان الاستمرار في سيطرتهم عليها.

لكنها حوّلت بذلك مواقعها إلى أهداف لقوات دولة صنعاء التي تجيد فنون الكرّ والفرّ، ما مكّنها من استنزاف حيوية جيوش العدوان وتحالفاتهم البحرية والجوية وحوّلتهم أهدافاً يصطادها المجاهدون بفنون قتال تاريخية.

إن هذا الاستيعاب للقوات الغازية، منح مجاهدي اليمن فرصة من الانتقال الى المرحلة الثانية التي أثارت دهشة المراقبين العسكريين في العالم، فكيف يمكن لبلد متواضع الإمكانات ومحاصَر ويحتلّ العدوان قسماً كبيراً منه أن ينتقل من الدفاع والقتال في الداخل الى اختراق الحدود السعودية المواجهة لأعالي صعدة الجبلية والسيطرة على أراضٍ سعودية، متسبباً بذعر سعودي يطلق أصوات استغاثة طلباً لنجدة من تغطياته الغربية والإقليمية والإسرائيلية.

لم يكتف المجاهدون بهذا القدر فأرسلوا صواريخ باليستية وطائرات مسيرة نحو أهداف نفطية واقتصادية وعسكرية أصابت أهدافها في مناطق مختلفة، وأحدثت رعباً داخلياً وخارجياً.

إن الطريقة التدريجية في قتال غير متكافئ بسبب الدعم الغربي المفتوح للسعودية جعل من الاسلحة العابرة للأجواء وسيلة لوضع الوظيفة النفطية السعودية في موقع صعب، بدليل أنه أصبح بإمكان انصار الله عرقلة إنتاج النفط كلما شعروا بالحاجة إلى إفهام آل سعود أن وجودهم الاحتلالي في اليمن أصبح على مشارف الهاوية، ما يعني أن عليهم الرحيل بسرعة.

يتبين إذاً أن أنصار الله فرضوا بقوة مُسَيّراتِهم الجوية، دوراً أساسياً لهم في النفط وبالقوة، لكنهم لم يكتفوا بهذه الوظيفة الشديدة الأهمية، ملحقين بها وظيفة أخرى، وهي حقهم بالمشاركة في أمن الملاحة في رأس الخليج عند حدود السعودية مع الكويت والعراق وحتى حدوده مع بحر عدن مروراً بمضيق هرمز وصولاً إلى باب المندب، فإذا كان الاميركيون يناشدون دول الغرب والشرق للمشاركة في أمن ملاحة مزعوم أفلا يحق لأهل الخليج والبحر الأحمر المشاركة في هذا الكرنفال؟

ضمن هذه المعادلة، يجب إدراج قصف المجاهدين اليمنيين لمدينة الدمَّام في الشمال الشرقي للسعودية مقابل الخليج، وقصف عرض عسكري في عدن المطلة بدورها على بحرها المرتبط بالخليج، فمن كانت لديه القدرة على إرسال صواريخ لمسافات تتجاوز 1200 كيلومتر وتصيب أهدافها بدقة، هو شريك بقوته العسكرية في أمن الملاحة، إنما على الطريقة اليمنية، وهذا يضع السعودية وحلفاءها في زاوية ضيقة لا فرار منها، فإما الانسحاب من اليمن على طريقة فرار المهزومين أو تقليص عائداتها من النفط واختراق حدودها وإرباك الملاحة في الخليج.

فماذا تختار؟ ربما يصنع أنصار الله مفاجآت جديدة فانتظروها.. وعندها لن ينفع الندم السعودي.

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SAUDI-LED COALITION CONFIRMS HOUTHIS USED CRUISE MISSILE IN ABHA AIRPORT ATTACK (PHOTOS)

South Front

On June 21, the Saudi-led coalition showcased remains of the projectile the Houthis used in the recent attack on Abha International Airport. The remains, which were inspected by U.S. envoy on Iran, Brian Hook, proved that the projectile was a cruise missile.

Saudi newspaper, Sabq, released photos showing remains of the missile’s fins and fuselage. The characteristics of the fuselage and the fins appear to be similar to that of the Soviet Kh-55 cruise missile.

Saudi-led Coalition Confirms Houthis Used Cruise Missile In Abha Airport Attack (Photos)

Click to see full-size image. Source: sabq.org

Saudi-led Coalition Confirms Houthis Used Cruise Missile In Abha Airport Attack (Photos)

Click to see full-size image. Source: sabq.org

One of the photos shows the remains of the missile’s engine, which was identified as the TJ-100. The turbojet engine, that’s is produced by Czech’s PBS Velká Bíteš, is not used in any known missile.

Saudi-led Coalition Confirms Houthis Used Cruise Missile In Abha Airport Attack (Photos)

Click to see full-size image. Source: sabq.org

While the cruise missile was designed after the Kh-55, it remains unclear if it was indeed developed and manufactured by the Houthis themselves.

In 2017, the Houthis launched what is suspected to be an Iranian Soumar cruise missile, a copy of the Kh-55, at the Barakah nuclear power plant in the UAE. This may explain how the Yemeni group and its backers got familiar with the missile’s design.

Saudi-led Coalition Confirms Houthis Used Cruise Missile In Abha Airport Attack (Photos)

Iranian Soumar missile, a copy of Kh-55. Click to see full-size image.

The Houthis’ new mysterious cruise missile proved to be effective when it hit the arrival terminal in Abha International Airport on June 12 with high-accuracy. The same type of cruise missiles was likely used in the June 19 attack on the al-Shuqaiq Water Desalination and Power Plant in southwestern Saudi Arabia.

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