Blackwater/Academi Mercenaries Procured By United Arab Emirates Are Now Fighting In Yemen

MAY 31, 2016

blackwater_xe_academi

By Brandon Turbeville

Receiving scant attention from Western mainstream media outlets except for a few notable exceptions, Americans and many alternative media outlets have remained ignorant to the fact that private mercenaries from Blackwater (aka Academi) appear to have been contracted by the GCC Gulf state feudal monarchies to assist in the military war of terror in Yemen against the Houthi rebels and the embattled Yemeni people.

Still, on December 9, a flurry of reports from media outlets such as Press TVTeleSur TVAl-ManarAl –Bawaba, and Colombia Reports have revealed that around 15 Blackwater mercenaries have been killed in a fierce battles with the Houthi forces.

Al-Masirah, Yemen’s Arabic language website reported that the Commander-In-Chief of the firm’s operation in Yemen, a Mexican national, was killed in the al-Omari district of Ta’izz Province.

Press TV reports that a number of British, French, and Australian advisers and commanders as well as six Colombian soldiers were killed.

In late November of 2015, it was reported that around 1,800 former Latin American soldiers who had been recruited by a program once managed by Blackwater founder Erik Prince were being trained in the desert of the United Arab Emirates to be used against the Houthis at some point.

It was estimated that about 450 of the soldiers were from Colombia.

The New York Times wrote that “The United Arab Emirates has secretly dispatched hundreds of Colombian mercenaries to Yemen to fight in that country’s raging conflict, adding a volatile new element in a complex proxy war that has drawn in the United States and Iran.”

El Tiempo placed the mercenary presence much earlier, however, suggesting that 100 Colombian soldiers had entered Yemen in October, a claim corroborated by The New York Times.

Colombia Reports stated that the mercenaries were being paid around $1,000 more per week than what they would have been paid as part of the Emirati deployment, and over triple the amount they would have made as members of the Colombian military. The contracts are allegedly for three-month-front-line service.

The New York Times reported on November 25,

The Colombian troops now in Yemen, handpicked from a brigade of some 1,800 Latin American soldiers training at an Emirati military base, were woken up in the middle of the night for their deployment to Yemen last month. They were ushered out of their barracks as their bunkmates continued sleeping, and were later issued dog tags and ranks in the Emirati military. Those left behind are now being trained to use grenade launchers and armored vehicles that Emirati troops are currently using in Yemen.

Emirati officials have made a point of recruiting Colombian troops over other Latin American soldiers because they consider the Colombians more battle tested in guerrilla warfare, having spent decades battling gunmen of the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia, or FARC, in the jungles ofColombia.

The exact mission of the Colombians in Yemen is unclear, and one person involved in the project said it could be weeks before they saw regular combat. They join hundreds of Sudanese soldiers whom Saudi Arabia has recruited to fight there as part of the coalition.

In addition, a recent United Nations report cited claims that some 400 Eritrean troops might be embedded with the Emirati soldiers in Yemen — something that, if true, could violate a United Nations resolution restricting Eritrean military activities.

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The United States has also been participating in the Saudi-led campaign in Yemen, providing logistical support, including airborne refueling, to the nations conducting the airstrikes. The Pentagon has sent a team to Saudi Arabia to provide targeting intelligence to the coalition militaries regularly used for the airstrikes.

The New York Times also reports that, interestingly enough, the training program and the use of Colombian and other third world mercenaries by Gulf State countries has been taking place since as far back as 2010. The article states,

Hundreds of Colombian troops have been trained in the Emirates since the project began in 2010 — so many that the Colombian government once tried to broker an agreement with Emirati officials to stanch the flow headed to the Persian Gulf. Representatives from the two governments met, but an agreement was never signed.

Most of the recruiting of former troops in Colombia is done by Global Enterprises, a Colombian company run by a former special operations commander named Oscar Garcia Batte. Mr. Batte is also co-commander of the brigade of Colombian troops in the Emirates, and is part of the force now deployed in Yemen.

It should also be noted that Blackwater, or at least Erik Prince, was involved in setting up the program early on, although the firm currently denies ties to the program in 2015. Foreign media outlets obviously disagree on the level to which Blackwater and/or Prince’s firm are involved in the program. That the foreign fighters are mercenaries, however, is beyond doubt.
According to Al-Masdar’s Yemen correspondent, Tony Toh, another piece of the puzzle has now been provided in regards to the mission and methodology of the Saudi-Blackwater cooperation. Toh states thatAl-Masirah News, a Yemeni news organization, has revealed that Reflex Responses Management Consultancy LLC is the company doing the actual hiring of mercenaries from Blackwater to fight in Yemen.

RRMC LLC is an Emirati-owned company that specializes in hiring foreign mercenaries and fighters for the UAE’s military.

According to the Yemeni news source, Major General ‘Issa Seif Mohammad Al-Mazrawi, an Emirati officer, is the individual most heavily involved in the deployment of these mercenaries. Al-Masirahalso reports that a contract worth $529 million was signed between RRMC and the UAE government in March, 2015, around the beginning of the Yemeni crisis.

It is clear that the Saudis and the Emirates are grasping at any straws within their reach in order to shore up their faltering military campaign in Yemen and make up for the weakness of their own military forces that have repeatedly demonstrated that the GCC countries are nothing but paper tigers.

Brandon Turbeville – article archive here – is the author of seven books, Codex Alimentarius — The End of Health Freedom7 Real ConspiraciesFive Sense Solutions and Dispatches From a Dissident, volume 1 andvolume 2The Road to Damascus: The Anglo-American Assault on Syria, and The Difference it Makes: 36 Reasons Why Hillary Clinton Should Never Be President. Turbeville has published over 650 articles on a wide variety of subjects including health, economics, government corruption, and civil liberties. Brandon Turbeville’s radio show Truth on The Tracks can be found every Monday night 9 pm EST at UCYTV. His website is BrandonTurbeville.com He is available for radio and TV interviews. Please contact activistpost (at) gmail.com.

This article may be freely shared in part or in full with author attribution and source link.

The Total Collapse of Saudi Regime is Fast Approaching

Syrian Free Press

suadi-regime-funeral-poster

funeral of the Saudi regime drowned in the blood of innocents

To the casual observer, Saudi Arabia might seem like an emboldened nation that is asserting itself. They’ve been challenging Iran, fighting rebels in Yemen, threatening to invade Syria, and if some rumors are to be believed, they are currently trying to attain nuclear missiles from Pakistan. However, these aren’t the actions of a stable nation that is asserting its dominance in the region. These are the flailing death throes of a nation that is struggling to hang on.

Ever since global oil prices started to plummet, Saudi Arabia just hasn’t been the same. That’s no surprise. Since prices fell, other oil rich nations have been hurting as well. Russia’s economy has been on the ropes, Canada is plummeting into a recession, and Venezuela is on the verge of total collapse. However, there probably isn’t any nation on Earth that is more reliant on oil than Saudi Arabia. If anyone is going to be destroyed by low oil prices, it’s the Saudis.

The crux of the matter is that this country is running out of money. It doesn’t look like it at first glance. They’ve only recently started to dip into their enormous savings, and their debt to GDP ratio is remarkably low. However, they are hemorrhaging money at an alarming rate. They’ve been flooding the market with cheap oil to drown out their competition (a dangerous gambit for a government that receives 80% of its revenue from oil) , and they’ve been fighting several expensive proxy wars with Iran, which are not going so well. The situation is so dire that the IMF expects them to run out of money within 5 years.

For most countries this wouldn’t be such a big deal. They would just go into debt and kick the can down the road until their financial system crumbled after many years. But the Saudi’s can’t do that. Their government and their society is structured in such a way that they can’t maintain anything with debt. The reason why is that they are not a traditional nation-state.

In fact, Saudi Arabia is no state at all. There are two ways to describe it: as a political enterprise with a clever but ultimately unsustainable business model, or so corrupt as to resemble in its functioning a vertically and horizontally integrated criminal organization. Either way, it can’t last. It’s past timeU.S. decision-makers began planning for the collapse of the Saudi kingdom.

In recent conversations with military and other government personnel, we were startled at how startled they seemed at this prospect. Here’s the analysis they should be working through.

Understood one way, the Saudi king is CEO of a family business that converts oil into payoffs that buy political loyalty. They take two forms: cash handouts or commercial concessions for the increasingly numerous scions of the royal clan, and a modicum of public goods and employment opportunities for commoners.

Essentially, Saudi Arabia runs on institutionalized bribery. They need cold hard cash to keep the population in line, to keep the ever-growing royal family rich and happy, and to make sure everyone is doing their job. It’s not like what you see in most Western nations, where much of the population has a misplaced sense of civic duty. This system needs cash, and can’t survive on IOUs.

The elites in this society demand a life of perpetual luxury, and government handouts are the only thing keeping the oppressed masses from rebelling. Once they run out of money, everything will fall apart from the bottom up.

But the financial situation isn’t the only problem with the Saudi kingdom. Much of their budget is being burned up from fighting their war in Yemen, which they are losing badly. Dozens of their Blackwater Mercenaries were killed in a missile attack last month, the Yemeni rebels captured one of their military bases two weeks ago (within Saudi territory no less), and last week Yemeni forces managed to capture over a hundred Saudi soldiers.

This is a regime that rules with fear and oppression. How can they do that when their own military can’t beat an insurgency in their own backyard? When the handouts and bribes grind to a halt, and their population is sick and tired of being dominated by the Saudi family, how long do you suppose it will take for them to rebel?

And on top of all that, Saudi Arabia is faced with a severe water crisis. They’re heavily reliant on underground aquifers that aren’t renewable, and they use more water per person than in many Western nations (in fact, twice as much as the average person in the EU). They could run out of water in as little as 13 years. This has prompted the Saudi regime to start taxing water for the first time, partly due to the water crisis, and partly due to falling oil revenues.

As you can see, there are a lot of existential threats bearing down on Saudi Arabia. Their proxy wars with Iran are bleeding their coffers dry just as oil revenues have reached record lows, their oppressed population is restless, they can’t meet the demands of their gluttonous elites, and they’re facing a nationwide environmental disaster that could grind everything to a halt.

In short, one of America’s strongest allies in the Middle East and the linchpin of the petrodollar, is facing a complete collapse, and it may happen within a decade. This could lead to chaos in the Middle East, and would have huge ramifications for the global economy. And at the end of the day, there really isn’t anything that can be done to stop it.


By Joshua Krause of The Daily Sheeple Joshua Krause is a reporter, writer and researcher at The Daily Sheeple. He was born and raised in the Bay Area and is a freelance writer and author. You can follow Joshua’s reports atFacebook or on his personal Twitter. Joshua’s website is Strange Danger.


SOURCES:
The Daily Sheeple
Submitted by SyrianPatriots 
War Press Info Network at:
https://syrianfreepress.wordpress.com/2016/03/10/saudi-collapse/
~

The Total Collapse of Saudi Dictatorship is Fast Approaching

saudi tank wikimedia

The Total Collapse of Saudi Arabia is Fast Approaching

| |

To the casual observer, Saudi Arabia might currently seem like an emboldened nation that is asserting itself. They’ve been challenging Iran, fighting rebels in Yemen, threatening to invade Syria, and if some rumors are to be believed, they are currently trying to attain nuclear missiles from Pakistan. However, these aren’t the actions of a stable nation that is asserting its dominance in the region. These are the flailing death throes of a nation that is struggling to hang on.

Ever since global oil prices started to plummet, Saudi Arabia just hasn’t been the same. That’s no surprise. Since prices fell, other oil rich nations have been hurting as well. Russia’s economy has been on the ropes, Canada is plummeting into a recession, and Venezuela is on the verge of total collapse. However, there probably isn’t any nation on Earth that is more reliant on oil than Saudi Arabia. If anyone is going to be destroyed by low oil prices, it’s the Saudi’s.

The crux of the matter is that this country is running out of money. It doesn’t look like it at first glance. They’ve only recently started to dip into their enormous savings, and their debt to GDP ratio is remarkably low. However, they are hemorrhaging money at an alarming rate. They’ve been flooding the market with cheap oil to drown out their competition (a dangerous gambit for a government that receives 80% of its revenue from oil) , and they’ve been fighting several expensive proxy wars with Iran, which are not going so well. The situation is so dire that the IMF expects them to run out of money within 5 years.

For most countries this wouldn’t be such a big deal. They would just go into debt and kick the can down the road until their financial system crumbled after many years. But the Saudi’s can’t do that. Their government and their society is structured in such a way that they can’t maintain anything with debt. The reason why is that they are not a traditional nation-state.

In fact, Saudi Arabia is no state at all. There are two ways to describe it: as a political enterprise with a clever but ultimately unsustainable business model, or so corrupt as to resemble in its functioning a vertically and horizontally integrated criminal organization. Either way, it can’t last. It’s past time U.S.decision-makers began planning for the collapse of the Saudi kingdom.

In recent conversations with military and other government personnel, we were startled at how startled they seemed at this prospect. Here’s the analysis they should be working through.

Understood one way, the Saudi king is CEO of a family business that converts oil into payoffs that buy political loyalty. They take two forms: cash handouts or commercial concessions for the increasingly numerous scions of the royal clan, and a modicum of public goods and employment opportunities for commoners.

Essentially, Saudi Arabia runs on institutionalized bribery. They need cold hard cash to keep the population in line, to keep the ever-growing royal family rich and happy, and to make sure everyone is doing their job. It’s not like what you see in most Western nations, where much of the population has a misplaced sense of civic duty. This system needs cash, and can’t survive on IOUs.

The elites in this society demand a life of perpetual luxury, and government handouts are the only thing keeping the oppressed masses from rebelling. Once they run out of money, everything will fall apart from the bottom up.

But the financial situation isn’t the only problem with the Saudi kingdom. Much of their budget is being burned up to fight their war in Yemen, which they are losing badly. Dozens of their Blackwater Mercenaries were killed in a missile attack last month, the Yemeni rebels captured one of their military bases two weeks ago (within Saudi territory no less), and last week Yemeni forces managed to capture over a hundred Saudi soldiers.

This is a regime that rules with fear and oppression. How can they do that when their own military can’t beat an insurgency in their own backyard. When the handouts and bribes grind to a halt, and their population is sick and tired of being dominated by the Saudi family, how long do you suppose it will take for them to rebel?

And on top of all that, Saudi Arabia is faced with a severe water crisis. Much like California, they’re heavily reliant on underground aquifers that aren’t renewable, and they use more water per person than many Western nations (in fact, twice as much as the average person in the EU). They could run out of water in as little as 13 years. This has led the Saudi regime to start taxing water for the first time, partly due to the water crisis, and partly due to falling oil revenues.

As you can see, there are a lot of existential threats bearing down on Saudi Arabia. Their proxy wars with Iran are bleeding their coffers dry just as oil revenues have reached record lows, their oppressed population is restless, they can’t meet the demands of their gluttonous elites, and they’re facing a nationwide environmental disaster that could grind everything to a halt.

In short, one of America’s strongest allies in the Middle East and the linchpin of the petrodollar, is facing a complete collapse, and it may happen within a decade. This could lead to chaos in the Middle East, and would have huge ramifications for the global economy. And at the end of the day, there really isn’t anything that can be done to stop it.

Delivered by The Daily Sheeple

 

Pentagon mercenaries: Blackwater, Al-Qaeda… what’s in a name?

Blackwater CASA 212 over Afghanistan dropping supplies to U.S. Army soldiers

Blackwater CASA 212 over Afghanistan dropping supplies to U.S. Army soldiers. © soldiersmediacenter / Wikipedia


CIA-linked private “security” companies are fighting in Yemen for the US-backed Saudi military campaign.

Al-Qaeda-affiliated mercenaries are also being deployed.
Melding private firms with terror outfits should not surprise.
It’s all part of illegal war making.


By Finian Cunningham ~ RT


Western news media scarcely report on the conflict in Yemen, let alone the heavy deployment of Western mercenaries in the fighting there. In the occasional Western report on Al-Qaeda and related terror groups in Yemen, it is usually in the context of intermittent drone strikes carried out by the US, or with the narrative that these militants are “taking advantage” of the chaos “to expand” their presence in the Arabian Peninsula, as reported here by the Washington Post.


RELATED:
Blackwater, after suffering heavy losses, abandons Taiz, Yemen
Blackwater-after suffering heavy losses


This bifurcated Western media view of Yemen belies a more accurate and meaningful perspective, which is that the US-backed Saudi bombing campaign is actually coordinated with an on-the-ground military force that comprises regular troops, private security firms and Al-Qaeda type mercenaries redeployed from Syria.

There can be little doubt in Syria – despite Western denials – that the so-called Islamic State (IS, formerly ISIS/ISIL)) jihadists and related Al-Qaeda brigades in Jabhat al-Nusra, Jaish al-Fateh, Ahrar ash-Sham and so on, have been infiltrated, weaponized and deployed for the objective of regime-change by the US and its allies. If that is true for Syria, then it is also true for Yemen. Indeed, the covert connection becomes even more apparent in Yemen.

Last November, the New York Times confirmed what many Yemeni sources had long been saying. That the US-backed Saudi military coalition trying to defeat a popular uprising was relying on mercenaries supplied by private security firms tightly associated with the Pentagon and the CIA.

The mercenaries were recruited by companies linked to Erik Prince, the former US Special Forces commando-turned businessman, who set up Blackwater Worldwide. The latter and its re-branded incarnations, Xe Services and Academi, remain a top private security contractor for the Pentagon, despite employees being convicted for massacring civilians while on duty in Iraq in 2007. In 2010, for example, the Obama administration awarded the contractor more than $200 million in security and CIA work.

Erik Prince, who is based primarily in Virginia where he runs other military training centers, set up a mercenary hub in the United Arab Emirates five years ago with full support from the royal rulers of the oil-rich state. The UAE Company took the name Reflex Responses or R2. The NY Times reported that some 400 mercenaries were dispatched from the Emirates’ training camps to take up assignment in Yemen. Hundreds more are being trained up back in the UAE for the same deployment.

This is just one stream of several “soldiers of fortune” going into Yemen to fight against the uprising led by Houthi rebels, who are in alliance with remnants of the national army. That insurgency succeeded in kicking out the US and Saudi-backed president Abed Rabbo Mansour Hadi in early 2015. Hadi has been described as a foreign puppet, who presided over a corrupt regime of cronyism and vicious repression.

Since last March, the Saudis and other Persian Gulf Arab states have been bombing Yemen on a daily basis in order to overthrow the Houthi-led rebellion and reinstall the exiled Hadi.

Erik Prince

Erik Prince © rightweb.irc-online.org

Washington and Britain have supplied warplanes and missiles, as well as logistics, in the Saudi-led campaign, which has resulted in thousands of civilian deaths. The involvement of Blackwater-type mercenaries – closely associated with the Pentagon – can also be seen as another form of American contribution to the Saudi-led campaign.

The mercenaries sent from the UAE to Yemen are fighting alongside other mercenaries that the Saudis have reportedly enlisted from Sudan, Eritrea and Morocco. Most are former soldiers, who are paid up to $1,000 a week while serving in Yemen. Many of the Blackwater-connected fighters from the UAE are recruited from Latin America: El Salvador, Panama and primarily Colombia, which is considered to have good experience in counter-insurgency combat.

Also among the mercenaries are American, British, French and Australian nationals. They are reportedly deployed in formations along with regular troops from Saudi Arabia, Qatar, Bahrain and the UAE.

In recent months, the Houthi rebels (also known as Ansarullah) and their allies from the Yemeni army – who formed a united front called the Popular Committees – have inflicted heavy casualties on the US-Saudi coalition. Hundreds of troops have been reportedly killed in gun battles in the Yemeni provinces of Marib, in the east, and Taiz, to the west. The rebels’ use of Tochka ballistic missiles has had particularly devastating results.

So much so that it is reported that the Blackwater-affiliated mercenaries have “abandoned the Taiz front” after suffering heavy casualties over the last two months. “Most of the Blackwater operatives killed in Yemen were believed to be from Colombia and Argentina; however, there were also casualties from the United States, Australia and France,” Masdar News reports.

Into this murky mix are added extremist Sunni militants who have been dispatched to Yemen from Syria. They can be said to be closely related, if not fully integrated, with Al-Qaeda or IS in that they profess allegiance to a“caliphate” based on a fundamentalist Wahhabi, or Takfiri, ideology.

These militants began arriving in Yemen in large numbers within weeks of Russia’s military intervention in Syria beginning at the end of September, according to Yemeni Army spokesman Brigadier General Sharaf Luqman. Russian air power immediately began inflicting severe losses on the extremists there. Senior Yemeni military sources said that hundreds of IS-affiliated fighters were flown into Yemen’s southern port city of Aden onboard commercial aircraft belonging to Turkey, Qatar and the UAE.

Soon after the militants arrived, Aden residents said the city had descended into a reign of terror. The integrated relationship with the US-Saudi coalition can be deduced from the fact that Aden has served as a key forwarding military base for the coalition. Indeed, it was claimed by Yemen military sources that the newly arrived Takfiri militants were thence dispatched to the front lines in Taiz and Marib, where the Pentagon-affiliated mercenaries and Saudi troops were also assigned.

It is true that the Pentagon at times wages war on Al-Qaeda-related terrorists. The US airstrike in Libya on Friday, which killed some 40 IS operatives at an alleged training camp, is being trumpeted by Washington as a major blow against terrorism. And in Yemen since 2011, the CIA and Pentagon have killed many Al-Qaeda cadres in drone strikes, with the group’s leader being reportedly assassinated last June in a US operation.

Nevertheless, as the broader US-Saudi campaign in Yemen illustrates, the outsourcing of military services to private mercenaries in conjunction with terrorist militia is evidently an arm of covert force for Washington.

This is consistent with how the same groups have been deployed in Syria for the purpose of regime change there.

The blurring of lines between regular military, private security contractors with plush offices in Virginia and Abu Dhabi, and out-and-out terror groups is also appropriate. Given the nature of the illegal wars being waged, it all boils down to state-sponsored terrorism in the end.


RELATED:


FINIAN CUNNINGHAM

FINIAN CUNNINGHAM

Finian Cunningham (born 1963) has written extensively on international affairs, with articles published in several languages. Originally from Northern Ireland, he is a Master’s graduate in Agricultural Chemistry and worked as a scientific editor for the Royal Society of Chemistry, Cambridge, England, before pursuing a career in newspaper journalism. For over 20 years he worked as an editor and writer in major news media organizations, including The Mirror, Irish Times and Independent. His columns appear on RT, Sputnik, American Herald Tribune, Strategic Culture Foundation and Press TV.


SOURCES:
Originally published on Russia Today, 21/2/2016
By Finian Cunningham
Submitted by SyrianPatriots 
War Press Info Network at:
https://syrianfreepress.wordpress.com/2016/02/22/pentagon-blackwater/
~

Blackwater, after suffering heavy losses, abandons Taiz, Yemen

Syrian Free Press

Blackwater-after suffering heavy losses

(Leith Fadel, AMN) ~ The U.S. based Blackwater Group has reportedly abandoned the Ta’iz front in western Yemen after suffering heavy casualties over the last two months while fighting alongside the Saudi-led Coalition forces and the Hadi loyalists.

Local activists have reported this news after they intercepted a communication between Blackwater officers and members of the Saudi-led Coalition in the coastal province of Ta’iz.

In a matter of two months, the Blackwater Group has lost well over 100 casualties at the volatile Ta’iz front, including operatives from a dozen countries around the world.

Most of the Blackwater operatives killed in Yemen were believed to be from Colombia and Argentina; however, there were also casualties from the United States (U.S.), Australia, and France.

Blackwater Group’s withdrawal from the Ta’iz Governorate comes just four days after the Houthis and the Yemeni Army’s 48th Brigade of the Republican Guard seized Jabal Al-Shabakah.

blackwater-usa


SOURCES:
Leith Fadel, Almasdarnews
Submitted by SyrianPatriots 
War Press Info Network at:
https://syrianfreepress.wordpress.com/2016/02/20/blackwater-leave/
~

Blackwater Decides to Withdraw after Suffering Heavy Losses in Taiz

Local Editor

Blackwater Company decided to withdraw its mercenaries from al-Amri front in Taiz governorate after suffering major losses.

Blackwater’s decision to withdraw its most important battalion which has been named “Striking Force” of al-Amri front comes as a result of the human causalities in their ranks. This is based on the decision of the president of the legation board, Farsan Malta Blackwater, in which 7 faced death, thirty nine wounded and three missing from the mercenaries from Colombia, Valenzuela and Australia.

The decision caused a state of tension and confusion in the ranks of the UAE invasion forces that have been brought to Yemen.

In the meantime, security and military leaders of the UAE suddenly arrived in Aden on a private jet. The commander of the UAE Army Intelligence, Mazuod Al-Shehi, and the assistant of the commander of the UAE Air Force, Ibrahim Nassir Al-Alawi.

In this context, 5 planes are now waiting to start the transfer of Blackwater mercenaries from Yemen.

The army and people’s committees have announced the death of 7 which include the battalion commander of the Strike Force, Faselaf se serj, a Ukranian.

In addition to Alfobrnaryo, Colombian, Alvarez Banseros Chilli, Jarcko Fetals, Colombian, Jack Rechardson, Australian, Kasias Banuwater, Valenzuela and Karira de Nora, Colombian. Another thirty nine have been injured in clashes of al-Amri front before two days.

Source: News Agencies, Edited by website team

Saudi Invading Army Inflicted Heavy Losses by Yemen’s Qaher1 Missile Attack

The Saudi army suffered heavy losses on Tuesday when the Yemeni army and Popular Committees targeted the Jizan Regional Airbase by a domestically developed Qaher1 ballistic missile, sources told Al-Manar website.

The sources revealed that Saudi Crown Prince and Defense Minister Mohammed bin Salman paid a quick visit under very tight security measures to Jizan Public Hospital to check the dead and wounded among his soldiers who were killed in the strike on the Airport.

Bin Salman also visited a field hospital set up in the area following the aggression on Yemen after Jizan hospital became incapable of receiving the large number of dead and wounded among the Saudi ranks.

The Jizan regional airport was turned to be a military base for attacks after the start of the Saudi-US aggression on Yemen, and civil aviation was moved to Abha Airport.

Overland transport costs from Jizan to Abha are paid by the Saudi government.

Tuesday operation was the third time in which Yemeni forces fired Qaher1 at the airbase.

Source: Al-Manar Website

10-02-2016 – 09:36 Last updated 10-02-2016 – 12:28

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Top Saudi, UAE Commanders among 150 Forces Killed in Yemen Tochka Attack


Local Editor

At least 150 Saudi-led troops and mercenaries were killed in ballistic missile attack Saudi military headquarters in the western Bab-el-Mandeb area.

Yemeni sources told al-Manar that the Yemeni army and the popular committees launched late on Sunday a Tochka missile on the headquarters of the aggression command in the southwestern province of Taiz.

A top Saudi commander and an Emirati officer were among the casualties, the Riyadh-led alliance announced in a statement.

Saudi Colonel Abdullah al-Sahyan and Emirati officer Sultan al-Kitbi were killed at dawn on Monday “while they were carrying out their duties in supervising operations to liberate Taiz” province in Yemen’s southwest, the official SPA news agency said.

A Yemeni officer told AFP that both officers were killed when rebels fired a rocket at a coastal road in the strategic province, which overlooks the Bab al-Mandeb Strait.

Also among the casualties, were Saudi, Emirati, Morrocan troops, in addition to at least 42 mercenaries hired by the US-based private military contractor, Blackwater, the sources al-Manar.

At least 146 burned bodies arrived in Aden and Omran military camp, the sources said, reporting that the aggression forces sent a ship carrying medical supplies to the coast there due to the high number of casualties.

Meanwhile, other sources put the death toll of the attack at 80.

Source: Al Manar TV

14-12-2015 – 09:54 Last updated 14-12-2015 – 12:0

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