The Children of Yemen Face the Aggression’s Leukemia

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The Children of Yemen Face the Aggression’s Leukemia

Saraa Jamal Al-Shahara

During lean years, the US-backed Saudi-led coalition launched a war and a siege on Yemen. The killing machine relished in killing and destroying moving and inanimate objects alike, and the suffocating siege reaped everything else in all areas and services.

The Leukemia Center at Kuwait University Hospital in Sanaa is the only center in the Republic of Yemen still treating children with leukemia. Being the only one shows the barbarity of the coalition’s targeting. The center itself was not even safe from its targeting.

The center, with its limited capabilities and its medical staff that was affected by the consequences of the unjust siege and the disruption of salaries for four and a half years, has no chance for it to provide to children who come to it from all Yemeni governorates as a last resort from a reality rife with death.

The coalition’s siege continued to target this center and the children patients on a daily basis, killing them slowly and coldly and making their small bodies a hotbed of cancer and a path for its spread. It is also preventing the arrival of the appropriate medicine. The doctors at the center confirm the existence of a frightening spread of leukemia during the years of aggression and the emergence of very complex cases and new types of leukemia in children the specialized center had not previously seen.

The center’s pediatric specialist, Dr. Nasim Al-Ansi, told Al-Ahed News that an increase and exacerbation of the same type of cancer has been observed in recent years, as the incidence of [myeloid leukemia] has increased, and acute lymphocytic leukemia – the most common type – and cases that the center receives are significantly complicated and more difficult to treat.

Al-Ansi pointed out that in a large percentage of cases prior to the aggression, the affected white blood cells did not exceed 50 thousand, but in these years the cases of acute complex lymphocytic leukemia doubled. The number of white blood cells in some cases reached more than 100 thousand, 200 thousand, and 600 thousand. In some cases, it reached one million cancer cells.

What is worse is that the leukemia treatment center, which is the only one in the country, does not have the capacity to deal with these types of complex cancers, and most children suffer major setbacks that doctors cannot treat, especially with the collapsing health situation in the country as a result of the Saudi-led siege and aggression.

According to the pediatric specialist, “The center and its doctors suffer great hardship in treating children with complex cases of cancer, with whom relapses occur during treatment. The center cannot treat them. They need to travel outside the country to be treated in specialized centers and undergo marrow transplant. How is this possible for them when the aggression imposed its siege and closed all ports, including Sanaa International Airport?”

Al-Ahed closely monitors the pain of the children at the leukemia treatment center

On a field tour of the leukemia treatment center, we were surprised by the overcrowding of young patients and their families. Its yards, corridors, and rooms are filled with children waiting painfully and desperately for their turn in taking chemotherapy. This waiting often continues for days, even weeks. A large percentage of them come from distant provinces.

The number of children received by the center has doubled in recent years. In 2019, the center received 159 new cases. These numbers reached nearly 210 new cases in 2020.

Al-Ansi explains that the center “receives cases of leukemia from all governorates, and there is a wide spread of the disease in the governorates of Saada, Hodeidah, Amran, and Hajjah.” These governorates were subjected to the largest percentage of bombing by cluster bombs and prohibited and mysterious weapons. During 2019-2020, cases began to spread significantly in Ibb Governorate, which is one of the most important centers of refuge for the displaced coming from the most targeted and bombed areas.

Where would all these children go, especially since the number of the patients exceeded this modest center’s capacity?

Who will save children with leukemia from death?

Childhood in Yemen is deprived of dreams and hopes in light of the continued tyranny of the countries of arrogance. Young leukemia patients are stuck between their desperate struggle with more complex types of cancer on the one hand, and with no opportunity to cure it and slow down its horrific spread in their bodies due to the lack of medicines as well as the closure of all outlets for treatment abroad on the other.

They also suffer when they see one of their parents floundering in search for the cost of their medication or drowning in debts that accumulate for an open-ended journey with one end, as a result of the difficult living conditions caused by the coalition and siege.

“The blockade created difficulty in providing chemotherapy drugs. Patients wait for more than two weeks for these drugs to arrive. When they arrive, they do in small quantities that do not cover the need. Sometimes some kinds of drugs are available, while others are not,” Al-Ansi states.

These children suffer from cancer and aggression, then they are finally forced to choose death to escape their grief and pain. The death toll from leukemia increased between 2018 and 2020, and according to the center’s statistics, it exceeded 200 deaths.

Some of these children wish that cancer would leave them in this life a little longer for them to have the chance to ask the bosses of the aggression, why do you kill us a thousand times when you can do that to us only once?

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Yemen: The Stigma of Humanity

8/4/2021

Yemen: The Stigma of Humanity

By Yehya Salah El-Din

The aggression on Yemen has officially entered its seventh year. During the last six years, the international community turned a blind eye to the horrific massacres and violations committed against the Yemeni people which include killing, destruction, starvation, and a siege.

In an interview with Al-Ahed News, Acting Yemeni Minister of Human Rights Ali Al-Dailami detailed the war crimes that the Yemenis endured during the years of aggression.

Yemen: The Stigma of Humanity

– Destruction of infrastructure: The Saudi-led coalition deliberately destroyed infrastructure, including thousands of hospitals, schools, universities, power plants, roads and bridges, communication networks, and fuel supply facilities. In addition, it destroyed food factories, food storage facilities, transportation networks, drinking water, and irrigation facilities, as well as other civilian facilities that provide basic services. International humanitarian law prohibits the targeting of these sites.

– Starvation and siege: The Saudi-led coalition sought to starve and destroy the Yemeni people by targeting many resources that are essential for the survival of the civilian population. The total blockade imposed on all of Yemen’s land, sea, and air ports is a continuous inhumane practice that causes shortages of basic goods, especially food and medicine.

The Saudi-led forces are blocking the entry of these basic goods that are needed to save lives, and the coalition also intensified its targeting of the port of Hodeida with the aim of halting its maritime navigation service. It completely closed Sanaa airport and strengthened all these inhuman measures by moving the Central Bank of Yemen from the capital to the Aden Governorate, which it occupies and controls through armed proxies. This resulted in salary cuts for state employees that started from the first month that the Central Bank of Yemen was relocated.

– The spread of famine and food insecurity was one of the consequences of the military attacks and sieges on agricultural crops, food storage facilities, livestock, drinking water, and irrigation facilities, in addition to the contamination of wells and irrigation tanks with chemicals and harmful materials that are internationally prohibited. Many lands and agricultural crops were also destroyed due to the use of internationally banned weapons, including phosphorus bombs, white phosphorus, and enriched uranium. These caused a humanitarian disaster, which has long-term effects on women, children, and the elderly.

– During the aggression and the blockade, Yemen faced a major crisis in providing food due to the illegal measures imposed by the coalition that also led to the country’s economic decline. This is widely regarded as one of the main causes of acute food insecurity, in addition to inflation, rising food prices, and the depletion of foreign exchange reserves.

According to an analysis, children in Yemen are the most affected group, as they are at particular risk of acute malnutrition, and they are in dire need of food and medicine. The percentage of the population that is food insecure this year is estimated at around 77% (13.3 million people), with an increase of 21.4% compared to 2017. Around 22.7% of the total population are in Emergency (IPC Phase 4), while 25.6% will soon be in Emergency (IPC Phase 3). With the continuation of the aggression, a large proportion of the population will suffer from acute food insecurity at the end of this year and be classified as living in Famine (IPC Phase 5). The percentage of food insecurity increased during 2018-2019 to 21.4% of the population.

Of course, women and children are the most affected groups by the Saudi-led aggression and blockade and are especially vulnerable to certain diseases, such as malnutrition and anemia.

This includes pregnant women and newborns. Statistics show us the high levels of malnutrition in children and women. More than 2.6 million children under the age of five suffer from malnutrition, including 500,000 who are suffering from severe acute malnutrition, and more than 1.8 million pregnant and lactating women suffer from malnutrition.

– There has also been a sharp decline in access to clean drinking water, decreasing from 10% to 66%, after the water and sanitation sector services were damaged as the coalition targeted dozens of tanks, water wells, springs, and water-raising pumps that run on solar energy. This is in addition to power cuts and lack of fuel, the high average cost of the production unit and the high cost of maintenance (95%), and the inability to pay workers in the sector. Water facilities have been damaged, and water projects in the public and private sectors have ceased to operate (the activities of many local institutions have stopped). The environmental situation in cities and urban areas further deteriorated due to the accumulation of solid waste and garbage. It is estimated that 20.5 million Yemeni people do not have access to clean water.

According to the Consumer Price Index data issued by the Central Bureau of Statistics, the cost of living has recently increased to more than 80%, compared to what it was before the aggression on Yemen. 92.2% of families do not have sufficient funds to secure their basic needs as a result of the aggression.

– There is also the spread of various epidemics and the increase in the number of chronic diseases, including all kinds of cancers caused by the coalition’s use of internationally prohibited weapons. Meanwhile, a high number of patients are suffering from kidney failure and diseases related to the heart, liver, and other vital organs.

The death rate is rising due to diseases and the lack of medicine.

Prior to the Saudi-led aggression, the rate of cancer incidence was 2.3% per year. It has since increased by 5.5% as a result of the coalition’s use of internationally banned and carcinogenic weapons. In March 2021, the number of people with carcinomas increased to 72,000. Meanwhile, the percentage of patients heading to consultation centers for periodic follow-ups and the external administration department for chemotherapy decreased to 20% during the aggression because people can’t reach health facilitates safely amid the bombing of bridges and roads.

The provision of ultrasound services, as well as surgical interventions and radiation therapy, decreased by 50% during the aggression. It also became difficult to obtain radioactive sources and linear accelerators. The radiotherapy service may be permanently stopped due to the poor efficiency of the currently available radioactive source, which may cause a humanitarian disaster for cancer patients.

The provision of some diagnostic services that were provided free of charge to patients in the center has stopped, and 50% of the chemical medicines required for patients, especially targeted therapies that need to be transported at certain temperatures, have been discontinued. The provision of essential medicines, antibiotics, and intravenous solutions decreased by 80% due to the blockade and the scarcity of financial resources.

Meanwhile, 40% of the diagnostic and medical equipment stopped working due to maintenance issues and the unavailability of spare parts. There are approximately 28 dialysis centers that may have to halt operations completely and no longer provide services to 120,000 people with kidney failure and diabetes, in addition to thousands of people with cancer and thalassemia. On the other hand, there are more than 75,000 patients who need treatment abroad. They are facing death as a result of the closure of Sanaa International Airport that is preventing them from traveling for medical treatment.

So far, there are more than 2,326,568 cholera infections and suspected cholera cases, and the number of deaths from this epidemic has reached 3,786.

The coalition used internationally banned weapons in many of its attacks. Medical reports confirmed that the weapons and ammunition used by the coalition caused deformities of fetuses and newborns, especially those weapons that were used in the governorates of Saada, Hodeida, Sanaa, and Taiz. These are the same weapons that the US forces used in their aggression against Iraq in 2004, especially in Fallujah. The attacks caused the deformation of hundreds of newborns and fetuses. Humanitarian organizations have warned against the use of these weapons in Yemen. These are the same weapons the Zionist entity used in the Gaza Strip in 2009, also resulting in the deformation of dozens of newborns and fetuses.

In many of the wars and armed conflicts that occurred in the past, civilian victims, especially women and children, are neglected. The sound of planes and missiles and sudden explosions result in a number of deaths, especially among women and children, and affect pregnant women and fetuses. Preliminary statistics, registered by the Ministry of Public Health and Population, showed that 450 women in 2015 suffered miscarriages due to fear, and anxiety caused by the bombardment.

Following the detailed presentation on the deteriorating humanitarian situation in Yemen as a result of the Saudi-American aggression and blockade, Acting Minister for Human Rights, Ali Al-Dailami, reviews Yemen’s Hiroshima, a report recently issued by the Ansarullah Political Bureau’s Rights and Legal Department.

In his interview with Al-Ahed News, Al-Dailami pointed out that this is the first human rights report that shows the scale of the coalition’s crimes that are being overseen by the US, Saudi Arabia, and the UAE and their mercenaries from within. It also shows the coalition’s brutality towards civilians. The reporter’s name obviously refers to the atrocities committed by the Americans in Japan during World War 2 – namely the nuclear strike on Hiroshima, which killed millions of people and destroyed the city. This is what America, its aides, and its tools are doing in Yemen. They are targeting both the land and people, with various types of lethal weapons that have long-term effects such as cluster bombs. The title of the report illustrates the brutal model being applied in Yemen, and against the Yemeni people.

Al-Dailami explains that the report documented the crimes the coalition committed against children, women, and the elderly using pictures and eyewitness testimonies. These crimes mentioned in the report are only a small part of what was documented by specialists who followed international standards and methodology in the monitoring and documentation process. There are still dozens of crimes and violations that have killed people, and the report focused largely on one of the most serious crimes stipulated in the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court, which is the premeditated murder that falls under war crimes, crimes against humanity, genocide, and the crime of aggression.

Al-Dailami notes that there will be other issues and publications on the various direct and indirect crimes that have affected Yemen and its people as well as their implications and repercussions on people’s lives.

The report includes three main parts:

– The rules of international law and the violations of the aggression thereof

– The alleged pretexts for the countries of aggression

– The crimes of the countries of aggression as narrated by the documentation team, victims, and witnesses

In response to Al-Ahed’s question about the role of human rights organizations in what is happening in Yemen, Al-Dailami points out that these groups acted against the basic framework of their work and did not adhere to the humanitarian agenda but rather to an agenda that corresponds to the demands of the coalition. The following are examples:

– International Resolution 2342: It indicates the poor humanitarian situation in Yemen that has become catastrophic in most of the country’s governorates and regions. But it doesn’t include any condemnation of the coalition and its daily crimes. This indicates UN and international collusion with the forces of aggression, which means more destruction, collapse, and the continuous deterioration of basic services.

– The closure of Sanaa International Airport: This is an unjustified closure. Meanwhile, the United Nations missions continue to use Sanaa Int. Airport for their flights exclusively without opening humanitarian and commercial services to the Yemenis. This makes the United Nations the main accomplice for the countries of aggression and fully responsible for the worsening humanitarian situation.

– Blockading ports and maritime outlets: The United Nations is fully aware of the extent of the impact of the imposed blockade on port traffic in Hodeida, Salif, and Ras Issa in particular. This situation imposed on the maritime ports is witnessed by the United Nations, but it continues to mislead the world in service of the Saudi-led coalition, which uses the blockade as a means of war on Yemen and the Yemenis.

– According to Al-Dailami, the speech of the Secretary-General of the United Nations at the opening of the fifth high-level humanitarian pledging event for Yemen was also an indication of the disregard for the suffering of Yemenis. Antonio Guterres acknowledged that famine is weighing on Yemen and the race is underway to save Yemen from the famine that most of the Yemeni people may be exposed to. He affirmed that there are quite a few Yemenis starving to death in conditions similar to famine.

– Meanwhile, reports from the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights in Yemen documented civilian casualties and the killing of a large number of civilians in the Shada District of Saada Governorate as a result of airstrikes and an intense attack by a military helicopter. It is clear that the United Nations body records the criminal incident and identifies the perpetrator. However, it does not take any measures related to the protection of civilians and redress for the victims. In addition, the United Nations is unable to hold the coalition’s forces accountable for their crimes against civilians.

Al-Dailami adds that the Yemenis are still following up on the statements of this agency and its officials, which are full of expressions of concern, and fear.

Jamie McGoldrick, the Humanitarian Coordinator for Yemen, expressed his grave concern about reports of airstrikes on civilians in Saada Governorate, including attacks on a house and a private car in two separate areas that resulted in the killing of civilians, including women and children.

The UN agencies keep reminding the parties to the conflict without taking any action that would stop the aggression and its tools from killing civilians in all Yemeni governorates. The following is from one of its officials:

“We recall that indiscriminate or disproportionate attacks or attacks targeting civilian objects such as markets are prohibited under international humanitarian law. We remind all parties to the conflict of their obligation to ensure full respect for international human rights law and international humanitarian law. All incidents resulting in civilian casualties … must be thoroughly investigated to ensure accountability when breaches of international law have been found to have taken place.”

At the top of the list of acts of complicity is the removal of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia from the list of countries and unofficial bodies that failed to adopt the measures necessary to protect children. It had a direct role in child recruitment, detention, kidnapping, sexual violence, and attacks on schools and hospitals.

The Secretary-General cited a continuous and significant decrease in the number of deaths and injuries in the airstrikes and the implementation of the provisions of a memorandum of understanding calling for the adoption of a program of activities aimed at strengthening prevention and protection measures.

He also added that the program will be subject to monitoring for a period of 12 months and that any failure in this field will lead to the inclusion on the list of the same violations.

“The secretary-general has brought shame on the UN by removing the Saudi-led coalition from his ‘list of shame’ even as it continues to kill and injure children in Yemen,” HRW’s Children’s Rights Advocacy Director Jo Becker said as she reacted to this UN decision.

For her part, Adrian Labar, the director of Watchlist, an NGO concerned with children and armed conflict, said that the removal “sends the message that powerful actors can escape the killing of children.” She called for an “independent, objective, and transparent evaluation of the process that led to the decision” of removing Saudi Arabia from the list of shame.

The Saudi-led coalition remained on the blacklist for three years, as it was added to the list in 2016. It was later removed after protests by Saudi Arabia. The Secretary-General of the United Nations at the time, Ban Ki-moon, accused Saudi Arabia of exerting unacceptable pressure on the United Nations, as allied countries have threatened to cut off funding for humanitarian aid programs.

According to Al-Dailami, evidence of collusion, condemned by all Yemeni society, people, and institutions, is evident through the stance of the international community towards the coalition’s practices – it gives the coalition more room to commit crimes against Yemenis every day. This stance is a reflection of the lack of responsibility and appreciation of the magnitude of the humanitarian situation in Yemen, which goes beyond just being a political crisis.

In response to a question about whether the continuation of the aggression will contribute to the subjugation of the Yemeni people, Al-Dailami asserts that the Yemeni people have conveyed their message to the world.

The plan to occupy Yemen was concluded in the US capital and cooked in the kitchens of the American intelligence. It was decided that it will only take two weeks. But here we are, seven years later! They thought that things would go according to their plan. However, God’s plan and kindness to the army, the popular committees, and the missile force, the supervision of a wise leadership – represented by Sayyed Abdul Malik Badreddine al-Houthi – with strong confidence in God and its representative, and the steadfastness of the Yemeni people have foiled all external bets. There is no doubt that solidarity and support are important from a leader like His Eminence Sayyed Hassan Nasrallah and the Islamic Republic.

Al-Dailami notes that the ongoing siege is killing the Yemeni people, and it has become tighter since Biden took office and announced that he would seek peace in Yemen. This is his way of building peace through blackmail. These are their initiatives, and this is their alleged peace. International silence clearly and explicitly confirms that laws, international agreements, the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, and the United Nations Charter have died and are only a cover for the interests of major countries, even at the expense of dead women and children.

Al-Dailami stressed that the Yemeni people depend on God and move with their steadfastness to defend against injustice and their just cause. As for the countries of aggression, they are losers. He points out that the Yemeni people convey the most wonderful examples of sacrifice, and steadfastness. They insist on the independence of their country and respect for its sovereignty. They are steadfast, defiant, proud, and a great people.

Addressing the forces of aggression, Al-Dailami says: “Haven’t you had enough of killing civilians, especially children and women? Haven’t you had enough lessons to learn from great men? You are facing the Yemeni people! The saying tells you, ‘Yemen is the graveyard of invaders.’”

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نيويورك تايمز”: 400 ألف طفل يمني مهددون بالموت جوعاً Famine Stalks Yemen, as War Drags On and Foreign Aid Wanes

الكاتب: شعيب المساوى وبن هوبرد

المصدر: نيويورك تايمز

1 نيسان 11:26

تقول الأمم المتحدة إن 3.6 مليون يمني يواجهون نقصاً طارئاً في المواد الغذائية، وأن 16500 منهم وصلوا إلى مستويات كارثية.

طفل يعاني من سوء التغذية مع والدته في مخيم للنازحين في محافظة حجة شمال اليمن.
طفل يعاني من سوء التغذية مع والدته في مخيم للنازحين في محافظة حجة شمال اليمن

قالت صحيفة “نيويورك تايمز” الأميركية إنه للمرة الثانية خلال 3 سنوات، يخيم خطر المجاعة على نطاق واسع على اليمن، الدولة التي مزقتها الحرب، حيث يتشرد الملايين ويكافحون يومياًُ للعثور على الطعام.

وأضافت أن الحرب قد أدت إلى نقص مزمن في الغذاء في اليمن، وهي ما كانت بالفعل أفقر دولة في العالم العربي. 

وتم تفادي المجاعة في عام 2018 فقط من خلال التدفق الكبير للمساعدات الأجنبية. لكن جماعات الإغاثة تقول إن التهديد أكبر هذه المرة مع اشتداد الحرب، وتفشي الوباء الذي جعل الدول المانحة أكثر تركيزاً على الشؤون الداخلية.

وقالت الصحيفة إنه عندما أصيب ابن إيمان مرشد البالغ من العمر 8 أشهر بحمى وقيء، أمضت ثلاثة أيام في محاولة الذهاب إلى أقرب عيادة، وفي النهاية خرجت سيراً على الأقدام لمدة ساعتين مع طفلها. وحتى بعد أسبوع من العلاج، تركه سوء التغذية الحاد ضعيفاً وبالكاد هو قادر على الحركة.

وتابعت “نيويورك تايمز”: تقول الأمم المتحدة إن 3.6 مليون يمني يواجهون نقصاً طارئاً في المواد الغذائية، وأن 16500 منهم وصلوا إلى مستويات كارثية. وتقدر المنظمة الدولية أن 400 ألف طفل يمني معرضون لخطر الموت جوعاً. 

نقله إلى العربية: الميادين نتإن الآراء المذكورة في هذه المقالة لا تعبّر بالضرورة عن رأي الميادين وإنما تعبّر عن رأي الصحيفة حصراً

Famine Stalks Yemen, as War Drags On and Foreign Aid Wanes

For the second time in three years, the threat of widespread famine hangs over the war-torn country, where millions are displaced and struggle daily to find food.

By Shuaib Almosawa and Ben HubbardMarch 31, 2021

A 4-year-old child suffering from malnutrition with his mother at a camp for internally displaced people this month in Yemen’s northern Hajjah province.
A 4-year-old child suffering from malnutrition with his mother at a camp for internally displaced people this month in Yemen’s northern Hajjah province.Credit…Essa Ahmed/Agence France-Presse — Getty Images

AL HARF, Yemen — The mother’s first challenge when her spindly 8-month-old son came down with a fever, diarrhea and vomiting was to get from their poor, isolated village in northern Yemen to the nearest clinic.

After three days of failing to find a ride, she set out on foot, carrying her sick child for two hours to reach the medics who immediately recognized yet another case in Yemen’s spiraling crisis of acute malnutrition.

Even after a week of treatment with enriched formula, the boy, Sharaf Shaitah, lay motionless on a hospital bed, his bones peeking through the skin of his twiggy limbs. Asked if her family had enough to eat, his mother, Iman Murshid, replied, “Sometimes we have enough, sometimes we don’t.”

Six years into a war that has killed hundreds of thousands of people, shattered the country and battered much of its infrastructure, Yemen faces rising rates of hunger that have created pockets of famine that aid groups warn are likely to grow, leaving even more malnourished Yemenis vulnerable to disease and starvation.

The war has led to chronic food shortages in what was already the Arab world’s poorest country. A widespread famine was averted in 2018 only by a large influx of foreign aid. But the threat is greater this time, aid groups say, as the war grinds on, families grow poorer and the coronavirus pandemic has left donor nations more focused on their own people.

“The famine is on a worsening trajectory,” said David Beasley, the executive director of the World Food Program, in an interview after returning recently from Yemen. “Our biggest problem now is lack of money — and the war. Six years of war has completely devastated the people in every respect.”

Nearly half of Yemen’s population, 13.5 million people, are struggling to get enough food, according to the United Nations. That number is expected to rise by nearly three million by the end of June, largely because funding shortfalls have reduced how many people aid agencies can feed.

The United Nations says that 3.6 million Yemenis are already in an “emergency” stage of food shortage, and 16,500 have reached “catastrophe.” It estimates that 400,000 children are at risk of dying of hunger.

“If we don’t get them on full rations soon, I just don’t imagine we won’t have a full-scale famine,” Mr. Beasley said.

A World Food Program distribution site last year in Sana, Yemen.
A World Food Program distribution site last year in Sana, Yemen.Credit…Khaled Abdullah/Reuters

Yemen has been on a downward spiral since 2014, when rebels allied with Iran and known as the Houthis seized the country’s northwest, including the capital, Sana, sending the government into exile.

In 2015, a coalition of Arab countries led by Saudi Arabia and backed by the United States began a bombing campaign aimed at ousting the Houthis, but the war settled into a stalemate, with competing administrations in the north and south and attacks frequently killing civilians.

Aid groups have reported that coalition airstrikes, often using American munitions, have been the leading direct cause of civilian casualties, killing thousands of people. In 2019, Congress voted to end U.S. support for the Saudi-led campaign, but President Donald J. Trump vetoed the measure.

Within days of taking office, President Biden froze some arms sales to the coalition and halted intelligence and logistical support for it. He has appointed a high-level envoy to push for peace talks, and Saudi Arabia has announced a new peace plan, but those efforts have yet to make concrete progress.

The growing hunger crisis stems from the wider breakdown of Yemen’s economy during the war, experts say. The United Nations estimates that the war has claimed more than 200,000 lives, mostly from indirect causes like hunger and disease.

The shattering of the country has displaced millions of people, separating them from their livelihoods and leaving them dependent on aid. Even people who still have jobs have been left destitute. The competing governments in the north and south have struggled to pay salaries, and a drop in the value of Yemen’s currency has rendered imported products unaffordable in a country that imports nearly all of its food.

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Economic slowdowns in wealthy Gulf countries have cut into remittances sent home by Yemeni expatriates, an economic lifeline for many families. An air and sea blockade by the Saudi-led coalition on Houthi-controlled territory has restricted imports of vital goods like fuel.

Aid groups warn that spreading hunger contributes to health problems that Yemen is not equipped to deal with, especially among children, and that more people could end up dying from illnesses exacerbated by hunger than from the war itself.

“The truth is that people don’t have enough food and they can die from causes related to that,” said Bismarck Swangin, a spokesman for UNICEF in Yemen. “When you say famine-like conditions, people’s bodies are collapsing because they don’t have enough food.”

The crisis has fallen hard on rural clinics in areas battered by war.

A Yemeni mother feeding her malnourished child at a maternity and children’s hospital this month in Sana.
A Yemeni mother feeding her malnourished child at a maternity and children’s hospital this month in Sana.Credit…Mohammed Huwais/Agence France-Presse — Getty Images

The clinic where Ms. Murshid brought her son, the Harf Sufian Rural Hospital, about 85 miles north of Sana, receives as many as 40 malnutrition cases per month.

Its medics have only six beds for malnourished children and treat them with enriched formula and vitamin supplements provided by aid organizations. But they lack antibiotics to treat associated infections and isolation rooms to prevent children with measles or respiratory infections from passing them to other patients.

The clinic also lacks an intensive care unit for children who arrive there in critical condition. Many of them don’t survive long enough to reach better-equipped facilities.

“Most cases die due to the lack of an I.C.U.,” said Muhammad al-Qadhi, a nutritionist, flipping through photos of bony children with hollow eyes who have died in the clinic.

The number of malnutrition cases the clinic handles has climbed steadily, said Abdulelah Otilah, the director, but its services have been jeopardized by funding cuts by international aid groups. The clinic has not received a fuel shipment since December and is down to its last 60 liters of diesel for the electricity generator that powers incubators for premature babies.

Unless more fuel arrives, “death then looms large,” Dr. Otilah said. “We can’t help but ask God for support.”

Yemen faced the threat of famine in 2018, prompting large donations from countries including the United States, the United Arab Emirates and Saudi Arabia, which also allocated $2 billion to support Yemen’s central bank.

Those measures pulled the country back from the brink, but without solving Yemen’s underlying problems. Early last year, when donor countries were shifting their focus to protecting their own populations and economies from the coronavirus pandemic, the aid budget for Yemen fell short again and hunger increased.

A U.N. pledging conference on March 1 aimed to raise $3.85 billion to help Yemen avoid famine. But participating countries committed less than half that much, $1.7 billion, forcing U.N. agencies to scale back their plans.

Patients undergoing dialysis treatment at a hospital in the port city of Al Hudaydah.
Patients undergoing dialysis treatment at a hospital in the port city of Al Hudaydah.Credit…Agence France-Presse — Getty Images

“Cutting aid is a death sentence,” the U.N. secretary general, António Guterres, said of the outcome.

Rafat al-Akhali, a fellow at the Blavatnik School of Government at Oxford University who studies Yemen, said that frustration with the lack of progress toward ending the war, questions about the efficacy of the United Nations and concerns about Houthi interference with aid delivery had all contributed to reduced donations.

Foreign aid can help Yemeni families avoid catastrophe, he said, but only an end to the war can ease Yemen’s many crises.

“The real solution is for the conflict to stop and for some semblance of normality to be restored, but without that what are you left with other than aid coming in from U.N. agencies or an injection of cash?” he said.

In another rural clinic near the town of Qaflat Athr, also north of Sana, Amna Hussein, 15 months old, lay weakened by diarrhea and vomiting linked to malnutrition. She had been treated in the same clinic last year and had improved, her mother said, and they had returned each week for nutritional supplements to keep her healthy. But last month, because of funding cuts, the supplements ran out and now Amna was back in the clinic.

Her mother, who declined to give her name because of shame, said that she and her four daughters had left her husband and moved in with her brothers, who had barely enough to feed them.

“We are like refugees in other people’s home,” she said. “You can only appreciate whatever is provided.”

Shuaib Almosawa reported from Al Harf, Yemen, and Ben Hubbard from Beirut, Lebanon. Rick Gladstone contributed reporting from New York.

I Pray for Peace in Yemen

March 25, 2021

A reflection through the eyes of a small Yemeni child

Ragheb Malli – London

The streets are harsh. The sky too. I don’t think I remember what Yemen in peace looked like. Baba said we are lucky we are still alive, but I don’t think it is lucky to be alive just to survive. Taiz was my most beautiful city. I was planning to be a lawyer when I grow older, now I plan to just try and grow older. Mama said that I should be grateful we were still able to put food in our bellies, this isn’t food. My parents are too thin, as am I. Mama’s once pink, round cheeks are hollows of tears. Baba’s smile takes too much of his energy. I don’t know what we have done; all I know is I was living and playing – I swear, I did nothing else. There was an airstrike not too long ago near us, it killed many of Marwan’s relatives. The Saudi airstrike happened in the night, Baba said maybe they didn’t feel it as they must have been all sleeping. I know he is lying, the sounds of their planes always wake me up.

What I don’t understand is why no one is helping us. No one is shouting at Saudi to stop dispersing weapons and bombs. No one is shouting at them to leave our hospitals alone. No one is shouting at them to stop. The ongoing silence hurts me more than the snipers ever can. Yesterday Zahra came and asked me if I wanted to play, Mama grabbed my hand and screamed “Do you want to die?” and I screamed back, “No, I want to play”. She began crying and I felt bad, but I don’t know what I said.

I heard the radio this morning saying that a quarter of all the deaths in Yemen are children. Mama says that is a very big number for such a small people, we must be bad at hiding. Sometimes I try to make sense of this never ending disaster but I just don’t understand how so much suffering can go unnoticed. Baba says a lot of people are trying to help but the Saudi’s are making it impossible, they have blockaded supplies from coming in and now hospitals and everyone has no access to basic health care. I think they don’t want us to get better because Baba says people are afraid of the strong. But they have nothing to be afraid of, I just want to live and grow up and eat ice cream in the summer. Now I just worry where we will get our grains from because the news told us that Saudi planes have bombed the grains port. So now no help, no supplies and no food. People are already dyeing from all three, so maybe it has to be our turn next.

I have lost hope, just as I have lost most of my aunts, uncles, cousins and friends. I am just waiting and thinking about when and how it will happen. Maybe we will die together at home in an air raid, or maybe we will run out of food. I may step on a bomb or I may die of one of those new diseases that are going around. Either way, it will be our turn soon – we’ve been alive for too long, I just pray it doesn’t hurt.

In ten years time, I pray that Yemen will have found peace and that people are chubby. I pray that people will stand up for us and protect us. Baba said if people don’t put pressure on their governments this will continue until there is no Yemen left. He is wrong, there will be a Yemen, just no people left in it. I pray that one day on a hot summer’s day, I will eat ice cream outside without Mama crying.

Source: Al-Manar English Website

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We Are The Terrorists

By Caitlin Johnstone

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Yemeni children 49c1e

The Trump administration is reportedly close to moving the Houthi rebels in Yemen onto its official list of designated terrorist organizations with the goal of choking them off from money and resources. The head of the UN’s World Food Program along with many other experts caution that this designation will prolong the horrific war which has claimed over a quarter million lives and create an impenetrable barrier of red tape stopping humanitarian aid from getting to the Yemeni people.

The United Nations conservatively estimates that some 233,000 Yemenis have been killed in the war between the Houthis and the US-backed Saudi-led coalition, mostly from what it calls “indirect causes”. Those indirect causes would be disease and starvation resulting from what UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres calls “the worst famine the world has seen for decades”.

When people hear the word “famine” they usually think of mass hunger caused by droughts or other naturally occurring phenomena, but in reality the starvation deaths we are seeing in Yemen (a huge percentage of which are children under the age of five) are caused by something that is no more natural than the starvation deaths you’d see in a medieval siege. They are the result of the Saudi coalition’s use of blockades and its deliberate targeting of farms, fishing boats, marketplaces, food storage sites, and cholera treatment centers with airstrikes aimed at making the Houthi-controlled parts of Yemen so weak and miserable that they break.

In other words, the US and its allies have been helping Saudi Arabia deliberately kill children and other civilians on mass scale in order to achieve a political goal. Which would of course be a perfect example of any standard definition of terrorism.

We are the terrorists. Saudi Arabia, the US, the UK, Australia, Canada, France and every other nation which has facilitated the horrific mass atrocity in Yemen–this tight globe-spanning power alliance is a terrorist organization the likes of which the world has never seen before. The unfathomably savage and bloodthirsty US empire designating the Houthis as a terrorist organization is the least funny joke that has ever been told.

We are the terrorists. I say “we” instead of our governments because if we are honest with ourselves, we as a civilian population are complicit in this slaughter. The horrors in Yemen are without question the worst thing that is happening in the world right now, yet they comprise barely a blip in our social consciousness. The overwhelming majority of us have seen the pictures and videos of starving Yemeni children, thought something along the lines of “Oh a famine, that’s so sad” and gone back to thinking about sports or whatever other insipid nonsense occupies most of our attention.

We are the terrorists. Yes it is true that we have been propagandized into our complicity with this terrorism and if the news media were doing its purported job Yemen would be front and center in our attention, but we are still complicit. We are still participating in it, still living in a society that is woven of the fabric of slaughter and brutality without rising up and using the power of our numbers to force a change. Just because you are unaware that you sleep on a bed of butchered children doesn’t mean you’re not lying in it.

We are the terrorists. But we don’t need to be.

We can begin waking up together. Waking up our friends and neighbors, spreading consciousness of what’s going on, raising awareness of the horrors our governments are perpetrating in Yemen and in other nations in the name of imperialist domination, helping each other see through the veils of propaganda to how much life and how many resources are being spent on inflicting unspeakable acts of terror upon our world instead of benefiting humanity.

The US government could force an end to the horrors in Yemen almost immediately if it really wanted to. If maintaining unipolar hegemony were suddenly advanced by giving the Houthis victory in Yemen instead of fighting to ensure Washington-aligned rule, the Saudis would withdraw and the war would be over within days. We could make this happen if we could spread enough awareness of the reality of what’s happening in Yemen.

Break the silence on Yemen. Pressure Biden to fulfil his campaign pledge to end the war which was initiated under the Obama-Biden administration. Oppose US imperialism. Weaken public trust in the mass media which refuse to give us a clear picture of what’s going on in the world. Help people realize that their perception of reality is being continually warped and distorted by the powerful.

We end our role in the terrorism of the empire by awakening the citizens of that empire to its acts of terror.

Millions of Children’s Lives at High Risk as Yemen Inches Towards Famine – UNICEF

Millions of Children’s Lives at High Risk as Yemen Inches Towards Famine - UNICEF

By Staff, Agencies

The United Nations Children’s Fund [UNICEF] Executive Director Henrietta Fore warned in a statement that “As Yemen slowly inches towards what the UN Secretary-General has described as potentially ‘the worst famine in decades,’ the risk to children’s lives is higher than ever.”

“The warning signs have been clear for far too long. More than 12 million children need humanitarian assistance,” she added.

The UNICEF Executive Director further noted that acute child malnutrition rates have reached record levels in some parts of the country, marking a 10 per cent increase just this year.

“Nearly 325,000 children under the age of five suffer from severe acute malnutrition and are fighting to survive.”

With the fact that more than five million children face a heightened threat of cholera and acute watery diarrhea, the UN official explained that chronic poverty, decades of underdevelopment, and over five years of unrelenting conflict have exposed children and their families to a deadly combination of violence and disease.

She went on to highlight that the COVID-19 pandemic has turned a deep crisis into an imminent catastrophe.

“Yemen’s health system has been on the verge of collapse for years. Countless schools, hospitals, water stations and other crucial public infrastructure have been damaged and destroyed in the fighting.”

“Humanitarian aid alone will not avert a famine nor end the crisis in Yemen. Stopping the war, supporting the economy and increasing resources are critical,” she added.

“There is no time to waste. Children in Yemen need peace. An end to this brutal conflict is the only way they can fulfil their potential, resume their childhood and, ultimately, rebuild their country,” Fore concluded.

Yemeni Children’s Plight Deepens as Globe Marks World Children’s Day

Yemeni Children’s Plight Deepens as Globe Marks World Children’s Day

By Xinhua News Agency

As the globe marks World Children’s Day on Friday, Yemeni children are suffering from hunger, poverty and disease amid the COVID-19 pandemic in the war-torn country.

“We have been warning for several months that Yemen was heading towards a cliff,” said Jens Laerke, spokesman for the Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs.

“We are now seeing the first people falling off that cliff,” Laerke said, referring to the war-inflicted Arab country’s younger generation.

During what the United Nations says the largest humanitarian crisis in the world, children in Yemen are the most vulnerable.

MALNUTRITION

When Mohammed Hassan was transferred to the Al-Sabeen Hospital in Sanaa, the 15-year-old boy weighed only 14 kilograms.

He suffered acute malnutrition for years because his family was never able to put enough food on the table since the starting of the war.

“My children and I are hungry… our daily meal is dry bread, and sometimes we do not get it. The war and blockade have devastated our life. We live now in a tenet with very little food,” Hassan’s father lamented.

Hassan’s family was one of the thousands of Yemeni families that become unable to secure one meal a day or rent a house as food prices are rising and the value of the country’s currency is falling because of the war.

About one-third of the Yemeni families have gaps in their diets, and hardly ever consume foods like pulses, vegetables, fruit, dairy products, or meat, according to the World Food Program.

The malnutrition rate among Yemeni children has soared to the highest level ever recorded.

The United Nations estimated that 7.4 million people in Yemen need nutrition assistance, and 2 million of them are children under the age of five.

In parts of Yemen, as many as 20 percent of the children under five are acutely malnourished.

COLLAPSING HEALTH SYSTEM

With nearly half of the health facilities in Yemen closed down, the other half is now barely functional as their operation almost completely relies on international aid.

The humanitarian aid is quickly draining off. According to the United Nations, 15 of its 41 major programs in Yemen have been reduced or shut down for lack of funds and the humanitarian response plan for Yemen is only 38 percent funded.

The surging malnutrition rate and a shattered health care system is a catastrophic combination. Yemen is now becoming a living hell for the country’s children.

Many families face a cruel and painful choice: to use the little money they have to treat the ailing children or to buy food and save the lives of the whole family.

Having limited access to sanitation and clean water, children here have fallen easy prey to deadly epidemics, including cholera, malaria, dengue fever, and the novel coronavirus.

Although Yemen has only reported about 2,000 COVID-19 cases, it has a death rate of 25 to 30 percent, one of the highest in the world. The United Nations Children’s Fund [UNICEF] warned that the COVID-19 pandemic in Yemen is “an emergency within an emergency.”

EDUCATION

The United Nations said that the war in Yemen has damaged or destroyed more than 2,500 schools and forced 2 million children out of school.

Many students have not been able to return to their schools for more than five years. Those who are lucky enough to go back often have to study in straw-roof huts or even under trees because the war has destroyed most of the school buildings.

But what’s worse than the shortage of classrooms and textbooks is the lack of teachers. Many teachers were displaced during the war and those who stayed did not get paid for years.

A recent UN statement pointed out that thousands of Yemeni teachers have not received salaries since the eruption of the war. Many of the teachers have sought other works to survive.

“Children out of school face increased risks of all forms of exploitation including being forced to join the fighting, child labor, and early marriage,” the United Nations Children’s Fund has warned.

CHILD LABOR

The war and blockade have caused the collapse of the country’s economy and the local currency, forcing millions of children to go to hard labor in order to help their families survive.

Adel Rabie, 13, should be in school. Instead, he works at a market in the Hajjah province in northern Yemen, trying to earn a living.

Adel says he tries to earn around two US dollars a day to buy some food for his mom and his little sisters living in a tent at a camp for the families, displaced by war from the northern border villages. Adel’s father died at the beginning of the war.

Labor is an everyday reality for around 23 percent of children between 5 and 14 years old in Yemen. They are vulnerable to exploitation and abuse.

Despite all disasters, the resilience and fortitude of Yemenis also provide some hope. We see parents help schools to build classrooms, doctors offer free treatment for poor families, charity bakeries give out free bread, and so on.

But if the international community does not act quickly, such hopes will also die out. It’s down to the world now to whether rekindle those hopes or watch the whole younger generation of Yemen slid into abysmal despair.

Malnourished Children Starve as Pandemic Worsens Yemen’s Humanitarian Crisis

Malnourished Children Starve as Pandemic Worsens Yemen’s Humanitarian Crisis

By Ben Farmer – The Telegraph

Starving children in Yemen are facing their worst levels of malnutrition since the country’s war began, as the Covid-19 pandemic has dramatically worsened the world’s worst humanitarian crisis.

Aid groups say the global spread of the new coronavirus has deepened economic chaos in the country of around 29 million people, making hunger a bigger threat than the outbreak itself.

A recent survey from the United Nations estimates acute malnutrition rates among children under five are at the highest ever recorded in parts of Yemen.

The country suffered a significant wave of Covid-19 infections and deaths in May and June. Those have now subsided, only to leave a devastating economic toll.

Covid’s arrival on top of the grinding six-year-long conflict has further weakened the economy, while the lifeline of remittances from overseas has dried up as economies in the Gulf have locked down. Transport restrictions have hit food supplies for a country which imports as much as 90 per cent of its sustenance.

“We are actually seeing the highest rates of acute malnutrition in Yemen since the very start of the war, which is incredibly concerning,” said Stephanie Puccetti, deputy programs director in Yemen for International Rescue Committee.

“Yemen already had a very high baseline level of malnutrition and then with the war it’s just continued to deteriorate over the past five years. The rates we are seeing now are absolutely the highest.”

Food prices have risen by 30 per cent, she said, while at the same time remittances had fallen by four-fifths.

“You can imagine these families that were already in such a precarious situation and already really struggling to survive are now having an even harder time to come up with the money on a day to day basis to but food for their families,” she said.

Estimates published last week by the United Nations found acute malnutrition had risen by 10 per cent in the south of the country this year. The most extreme form of hunger, called severe acute malnutrition, had gone up 16 per cent.

“We’ve been warning since July that Yemen is on the brink of a catastrophic food security crisis, said Lise Grande, the UN’s humanitarian coordinator for Yemen.

“If the war doesn’t end now, we are nearing an irreversible situation and risk losing an entire generation of Yemen’s young children.”

The lives of thousands of women and children are at risk, she said.

A severe lack of testing has made the spread of Covid-19 difficult to track in Yemen. Last week a first-of-its-kind study using satellite images to count fresh graves in the Aden region estimated 2,100 excess deaths between April and September around.

“This total is best interpreted as the net sum of deaths due to Covid-19 infection and deaths indirectly attributable to the pandemic,” said the researchers from the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine.

The indirect deaths would be those caused by disruptions to health services or by measures which may have caused problems accessing food, they added.

Millions of Yemeni Children Could Starve Without Urgent Aid

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By Staff, Agencies

Millions of Yemeni Children Could Starve Without Urgent Aid

Millions of children in Yemen could be pushed towards starvation by the end of the year as the humanitarian crisis is compounded by a lack of funding as the world grapples with the coronavirus pandemic, UNICEF said on Friday.

A report by the United Nations children’s agency indicated that the number of malnourished children under the age of five in the war-torn country could rise by 20% — to 2.4 million — unless the international community makes up for a massive shortfall in aid.

“If we do not receive urgent funding, children will be pushed to the brink of starvation and many will die,” said UNICEF Yemen representative Sara Beysolow Nyanti. “We cannot overstate the scale of this emergency.”

Yemen has been ravaged by a Saudi, US-led war for over five years. During this period, tens of thousands of people have been killed and millions displaced due to the violence.

The UN said that it is unable to keep an inflow of aid as the crisis shows no sign of ending. UNICEF needs nearly $461 million for its humanitarian response, along with $53 million for an effective COVID-19 response. Only 39% and 10% of these, respectively, have been funded.

Yemen’s healthcare system was already on the brink of collapse as it dealt with diseases like cholera, malaria and dengue, but the pandemic has just brought it dangerously close to shutting down. The country has reported over 1,000 infections but experts say that many go unreported because of lacking medical infrastructure.

The UN children’s agency also warned that nearly 7.8 million children were not in school, which puts them at a higher risk of exploitation through child labor and early marriage.

“UNICEF has previously said, and again repeats, that Yemen is the worst place in the world to be a child and it is not getting any better, “Nyanti said.

Yemeni Health Ministry Spokesperson to Al-Ahed: No Corona Cases in Yemen, Blockade Still Killing Yemenis

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Yemeni Health Ministry Spokesperson to Al-Ahed: No Corona Cases in Yemen, Blockade Still Killing Yemenis

By Nour Rida

The Yemeni government assured that the country is COVID-19-free up till this moment, despite the virus sweeping across the world. However, the Yemeni people still suffer the consequences of the harsh siege imposed by the Saudi regime and its allies and more people die by the day.

In an exclusive interview, the official spokesperson of the Yemeni Ministry of Health, Dr. Youssef al-Haderi told al-Ahed news that the Saudi regime continues to destroy Yemen today, whether through bombardment and hard power or through the siege that has been imposed on Yemen for more than five years.

Dr. Youssef noted “for five consecutive years, Yemen has been witnessing two types of destruction simultaneously; the military war and the siege that includes moving the Bank from Sanaa to Aden, shutting down the airports and territorial borders, and causing trouble in the only maritime border, which is the Hudaydah port.”

Dr. Youssef went on to explain “Now despite the spreading of Coronavirus around the world, Yemen is still Corona-free. However, the Yemeni people suffer dire conditions and thousands need instant medical care that is absent due to the blockade. The Yemeni people suffer from different deadly diseases such as Cholera, Diphtheria, H1NI and other diseases that have reaped the lives of thousands of Yemeni people whether men, women or children and millions have been infected with it. Some 320 thousand Yemeni patients also have been forbidden the right to travel abroad for treatment due to the shutting down of the Sanaa airport, and tens of thousands of these have died while the rest are dying gradually due to the shutting down of this airport.”

In addition to diseases spreading across the country, there are the wounded and injured who also require medical care and attention. According to the spokesperson there is tremendous pressure and burden on the health sector in Yemen. “There are the wounded and injured, whether civilians who were hurt during Saudi coalition raids or the popular committee and army members defending Yemen. These all need special medical care that constitutes an additional burden on the medical and health sector, not to mention the destruction of hundreds of hospitals and medical centers in Saudi raids. This all comes at a time when the government is no longer able to pay the salaries of some 48 thousand employees in the health sector alone, in addition to other factors that paralyzed the sector by 40%.”

The Saudi aggression on Yemen has increased the problems in the health sector of Yemen. Because according to Dr. Youssef, even before the war began 5 years ago, the health sector was fragile and by that the health sector witnesses a real tragedy after and during the war. Of course all this, according to Dr. Youssef is just a small portion of the bitter reality and the dire circumstances under which the Yemeni people live.

Moreover, the spokesperson underlined that the health sector suffers serious lack of medical equipment and needs. “Before the war on Yemen, around 800 thousand patients of diabetes, heart diseases, Thalassemia, tumors and other cases would receive free medicine subsidized by the government. Unfortunately, with the war on Yemen this is not possible anymore, not to mention the increase of prices by 150% due to the situation and the cut in salaries.” He also added that the Yemeni people are deprived from at least 28 types of essential medicines and lab solutions that cannot be imported due to the shutting down of the airport. “These medicines require express and quick transport and need certain cooling containers otherwise they would go bad. Also, it is worth noting that 93% to 98% of the medical equipment in hospitals have expired and might become unusable at any moment, with no ability to replace these or at least buy spare parts due to the blockade.”

In terms of the Coronavirus, Dr. Youssef assured that thankfully, Yemen has not registered any case yet. “There were a few suspected cases, these were all tested and the results were negative.”

Earlier, Yemen’s Health Minister Nasir Baoum said health facilities across the war-torn country have not recorded any coronavirus cases, and all arrivals through air, land and seaports are subject to checks. 9 cases were suspected, and these all, according to the ministry were tested and the results were negative.

On the readiness of the government, Dr. Youssef told al-Ahed news “All departments in the ministry and other concerned apparatuses are cooperating in order to confront the epidemic. Schools, universities and learning centers are closed and gatherings are forbidden. Also, the government is carrying out awareness campaigns and we can say that all sectors are carrying out their responsibilities in a good manner. There are also scientific and awareness campaigns across the country to raise more awareness on the importance of the required measures. We hope that we do not see any coronavirus cases in Yemen, because if we do it will really be a catastrophe. Of course there are also plans in case the epidemic spreads, the army and all other sectors will work together to contain it.”

Unquestionably, the absence of the international community does not come as a surprise. According to the spokesperson, “the international community is not only absent, but we can say that it has taken part in increasing the suffering of the Yemeni people, whether it’s the UN or other organizations. The entire world knows the suffering of the Yemeni people, and the crisis they are living due to the Saudi regime war but no one has done anything to lift it.”

Dr. Youssef concluded noting that “in terms of aid, these cover 19% of the needs at most, which means that Yemen is left with 81% deficiency and shortage in medical needs. Note that most of the time these aids do not come without agendas coming along. But anyways we do not count on the international community or await anything from it.”

Save the Children: Saudi War on Yemen Has Catastrophic Impact on Children’s Health 

Yemeni Resistance Forces Intercept, Down Saudi-Led Spy Drone over Jizan

By Staff, Agencies

Yemeni army forces, supported by allied fighters from the Popular Committees, intercepted and targeted an unmanned aerial vehicle belonging to the Saudi-led military coalition as it was flying in the skies over Saudi Arabia’s southwestern border region of Jizan.

An unnamed source in the Yemeni air defense forces told the media bureau of the Ansarullah revolutionary movement that Yemeni forces and their allies shot down the drone while on a spy mission east of the al-Khobe district of the region, located 967 kilometers southwest of the capital Riyadh, on Thursday.

The development came less than a week after Yemeni air defense forces and their allies intercepted a spy drone launched by the Saudi-led military alliance over the besieged city of al-Durayhimi in Yemen’s western coastal province of al-Hudaydah.

Back on February 8, Yemeni army forces and allied fighters from Popular Committees shot down a Saudi-led drone with a surface-to-air missile as it was on a spy mission over Kilo 16 district of the same Yemeni province.

Also on Thursday, an unnamed source in the Liaison and Coordination Officers Operations Room said that during the past 24 hours forces of the Saudi-led military coalition and their mercenaries have breached 116 times an agreement reached between the warring sides during a round of UN-sponsored peace negotiations in Sweden in December 2018.

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Press Conference Held About Violations of US-Saudi Aggression Against Yemeni Women

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Press Conference Held About Violations of US-Saudi Aggression Against Yemeni Women

A press conference was held Thursday, in Sana’a, about violations of the US-Saudi aggression against Yemeni women. It was organized by Entesaf Organization for Women and Child Rights on the occasion of International Women’s Day.

In the conference, Deputy Minister of Human Rights, Ali Al-Dailami, mentioned the violations that Yemeni women and their rights have been subjected to for five years by the aggression, while the world celebrates the day of women.

For her part, the Secretary General of the Supreme Council for Motherhood and Childhood Akhlaq Al-Shami reviewed the reality of motherhood and childhood in Yemen over five years of aggression, stressing that women and children have been deprived all their rights.

She explained that the aggression coalition has killed, injured and displaced thousands of women and children, and depriving millions of them the most basic rights such as education, health, protection, and the necessary needs such as clean water and food. 

The head of the by Entesaf Organization for Women and Child Rights Somaya Al-Ta’fi reviewed the organization’s report about the violations against Yemeni women, especially the killing and maiming of them, the murders, rapes, and kidnappings in the occupied areas.

The report indicated that the total number of the women that have been killed by the US-Saudi air strikes during the past five years was amounted to two thousand and 355 women, while the number of injured women reached about two thousand and 725 women.

Saudi Closure of Sanaa Int’l Airport Genocide against Yemeni Patients

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The General Authority of Civil Aviation and Meteorology confirmed that the US-Saudi aggression continued closure of Sana’a International Airport is a crime, and has reached the level of genocide, against Yemeni patients.

The spokesman of the Authority said that Sana’a International Airport would not have stopped 4 years without legal justification if there had been no international silence and collusion.

The spokesman, in a press conference, called on the international and human rights organizations to press the aggression’s countries to reopen Sana’a Airport to save who can be saved of the patients and to let the people  who couldn’t be back to home to do, especially in the deteriorating security situation in the southern regions and the recent lawlessness.

He call the human rights and humanitarian organizations to interact with the oppression of the Yemeni People and move the forgotten file in international forums.

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Yemeni Forces Launch Major Attack on Saudi-led Mercenaries in Mocha: Nine Ballistic Missiles, 20 Drones Kill or Injure Over 350

The spokesman of the Yemeni armed forces General Yehya Sarea announced Monday that a large scale attack was launched on the Saudi-led mercenaries in Mocha on the Western Coast in response to the ongoing Saudi aggression.

manar-021017700155423182110

General Sarea revealed that the Yemeni forces fired nine ballistic missiles and employed 20 drones to target the camps of the Saudi-led mercenaries, adding that over 350 of them, including Saudis, Emiratis and Sudanese, were killed or injured.

General Sarea noted that  added that the attack destroyed many of the mercenaries’ radars, vehicles as well as weaponry caches and much of their munitions.

Yemen has been since March 2015 under a brutal aggression by Saudi-led coalition. Tens of thousands of Yemenis have been injured and martyred in Saudi-led strikes, with the vast majority of them are civilians.

The coalition has been also imposing a blockade on the impoverished country’s ports and airports as a part of his aggression which is aimed at restoring power to fugitive former president Abdrabbuh Mansour Hadi.

Two years of war have killed more than 10,000 people, wounded 45,000 others, and displaced more than 11 percent of the country’s 26 million people.

Source: Al-Manar English Website

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US MILITARY SUPPORT OF SAUDI ARABIA’S HOPELESS WAR IN YEMEN

US Military Support Of Saudi Arabia's Hopeless War In Yemen

South Front

07.10.2019

The US has continued supporting its efforts against the Houthis.Since the beginning of the Saudi-led intervention in Yemen in 2015.

Despite wide-ranging and seemingly endless support, which comes in spite of bombing of civilian targets and other questionable methods of fighting the war, such as using child soldiers from African countries, Saudi Arabia is losing the war vs the Yemeni group.

The US maintains that it assists the Saudi-led coalition fighting in Yemen, because the Houthis are an Iranian-backed group whose “malign influence” must not be allowed to spread any further. Support against the Houthis is allegedly only expressed in weapon deliveries, training assistance, logistics and intelligence support.

However, the US is actively taking part in counterterrorism actions in Yemen, allegedly targeting ISIS and al-Qaeda, but there is little clarity of what exactly is going on in that regard.

In short, the US support for the Kingdom can be summarized in the following groups, laid out in a report focused on the war in Yemen called “Yemen: Civil War and Regional Intervention,” published on September 17th, 2019. [pdf]

Anybody who is even an involuntary and sporadic observer of the situation in Yemen can see that there is no such thing as a Civil War there, but regardless the efforts of the Trump administration, most of which began during the Obama administration are properly presented. Some are simply exaggerated, such as support for UN resolutions on the conflict:

  • Support for U.N. efforts to advance a political process – U.S. policymakers have repeatedly expressed confidence in the role of Special Envoy Griffiths to move the various Yemeni parties toward a political settlement. Moreover, U.S. officials have emphasized Yemen’s unity, saying that “dialogue represents the only way to achieve a stable, unified, and prosperous Yemen.” In September 2019, one U.S. official also announced that the United States was conducting talks with the Houthis to further a negotiated solution to the Yemen conflict.

This would make a difference if it was a bipartisan solution coming from US Congress and supporting by the presidential administration, but currently it is just hollow rhetoric.

  • Condemnation of Iran’s destabilizing role in Yemen – U.S. policymakers have repeatedly portrayed Iran as a spoiler in Yemen, bent on sabotaging peace efforts by lending support to Houthi attacks against Saudi Arabia.

This goes without saying, Iran’s role in anything at all is “destabilizing,” the Islamic Republic is “the enemy” and it must be opposed in any way possible.

  • Assistance for the coalition – According to President Trump’s most recent report to Congress on the deployment of U.S. armed forces abroad, “United States Armed Forces, in a non-combat role, have also continued to provide military advice and limited information, logistics, and other support to regional forces combatting the Houthi insurgency in Yemen. United States forces are present in Saudi Arabia for thispurpose. Such support does not involve United States Armed Forces in hostilities with the Houthis for the purposes of the War Powers Resolution.” In the summer of 2019, President Trump ordered the deployment of a Patriot air defense battery to Prince Sultan Air Base in central Saudi Arabia, as Saudi King Salman reportedly approved the deployment of U.S. forces on Saudi territory. According to the State Department, “We stand firmly with our Saudi partners in defending their borders against these continued threats by the Houthis, who rely on Iranian-made weapons and technology to carry out such attacks.”

It is simply a way to fight against Iran, through supporting the Saudi-led intervention in Yemen and disregarding any atrocities that are carried out, since Saudi Arabia claims it attempts to avoid civilian casualties and tries to protect human rights, but that is still simply a claim that is backed by no concrete efforts whatsoever.

  • Sales of armaments and munitions to Gulf partners – Though the Obama Administration placed a hold on a planned sale of precision guided munitions (PGMs) to Saudi Arabiain 2016, both the Obama and Trump administrations have approved several billions of dollars in major weapons sales to Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates. When the Trump Administration notified Congress of 22 emergency arms sales in May 2019, Secretary Pompeo cited Iran’s “malign activity” and the need “to deter further Iranian adventurism in the Gulf and throughout the Middle East” as justification for the sales.

Again, any actions that are undertaken are specifically aimed at countering Iran, regardless of whether there’s really any concrete evidence of Iran being present there. Yes, the Houthis are supported by Iran, but it apparently never gets excessive. Iran’s “malign influence” is the be-all and end-all of all justifications.

  • Humanitarian Aid for Yemen – As previously mentioned (see, The Humanitarian Crisis in Yemen), the United States is one of the largest humanitarian contributors in Yemen.

How much of that humanitarian aid reaches those that require it the most, those trapped in al-Hudaydah with the Saudi-led coalition continuing its attacks on the city in spite of the UN-brokered ceasefire surely aren’t being reached by it, or not by a significant part of it.

  • Finally, here comes the other be-all end-all justification – counterterrorism efforts by the US in Yemen – the United States has continued to work with local and regional actors to counter terrorist groups operating in Yemen such as al-Qaeda and ISIS.

These counterterrorism efforts are outlined in a June 2019 letter by Trump to US Congress:

“A small number of United States military personnel are deployed to Yemen to conduct operations against al-Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula (AQAP) and ISIS-Yemen. The United States military continues to work closely with the Republic of Yemen Government (ROYG) and regional partner forces to dismantle and ultimately eliminate the terrorist threat posed by those groups. Since the last periodic update report, United States forces conducted a number of airstrikes against AQAP operatives and facilities in Yemen, and supported the United Arab Emirates-and ROYG-led operations to clear AQAP from Shabwah Governorate. United States Armed Forces are also prepared to conduct airstrikes against ISIS targets in Yemen.”

In 2019 in southern Yemen, AQAP has periodicallystruck both ROYG troops and forces allied with the Southern Transitional Council. Fighting between the ROYG and the STC has raised some concern that a divided south will provide AQAP breathing room to reemerge as a terrorist threat both to Yemen and its neighbors.

Al-Hudaydah, one of the most significant, if not the most significant “stronghold” of the Houthis against the Saudi-led coalition is in the South, thus it would make sense it needs to be overwhelmed in order to defeat the terrorists. Such a justification is not too far from any possible future scenarios.

Regardless of this support, the Saudi-led coalition is losing against the Houthis, and it is losing heavily.

Even the UAE initiated a drawdown, with groups affiliated to it even carrying out strikes on the Saudi-controlled Southern Transitional Council (the “internationally-recognized” Yemen government).

“As previously mentioned, one possible explanation for the summer 2019 phased drawdown of UAE forces from Yemen was out of concern that the reputational damage the UAE had incurred from its active participation in the war in Yemen outweighed the military results it had achieved on the ground after more than four years of warfare.”

Clearly Saudi Arabia and the US have no such worries. After all, following the international outcry against Saudi Arabia’s aerial campaign in Yemen in 2018, Saudi Arabia reportedly invested $750 million in a training program through the U.S. military in helping mitigate civilian casualties. Clearly, they’re putting effort through paying copious amounts of money to silence the most influential “defender” of human rights – the US.

Reports praising US efforts to train and prepare the Saudi army for the fight are numerous, some of the most famous ones are regarding Maj. Gen. Frank Muth, who served as Program Manager (PM) for Saudi Arabian National Guard (OPM-SANG) for two years.

Muth quickly learned that the assignment needed three ingredients to be successful. “First, I had to develop a relationship with the Saudi leadership, and that took time and trust to build those relationships, and over time they trusted our recommendations,” Muth explained. “Of course, it wasn’t just me building the relationship, every Soldier and civilian that works for OPM-SANG plays a tremendous role in developing a strong relationship with their Saudi counterparts.”

He seems to have learned wrong, since his efforts led to quite little in terms of actual military success.

In the lengthy video he explains what transpired at SANG, and how it could’ve been successful back in 2017. In 2019 it is quite obvious that it wasn’t.

Most recently, the Saudi-led coalition’s “success,” in addition to the US’ massive support of its efforts there were once more reinforced.

The Houthis reported that they had carried out a successful months-long operation in southern Saudi Arabia that has resulted in the deaths of 500 Saudi-aligned troops and the capture of approximately 2,000.

Furthermore, the Houthis said that the attack on Aramco’s oil infrastructure was part of the operation, which the US and the Kingdom blamed on Iran. After all, drones and missiles went past several Patriot defense batteries and caused heavy damage, with almost all of them not being stopped. Those that were stopped, were actually aimed poorly, and weren’t really dismantled by the Patriot systems.

فیلد مارشال!@FieldMarshalPSO

Geolocation of Buqayq facilities Air defense systems.
this facilities at least defended by one Patriot PAC-2/3 , 3 Skyguard and one Shahine Batteries.

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Anthony Fenton@anthonyfenton

Saudi-Canadian LAVs as far as the eye can see

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Saudi Arabia has bought fighter jets, warships, air and missile defense systems for billions of dollars. The US even said that it plans to deploy more hardware to Saudi Arabia to defend it, that is surely not to be free, as well.

Regardless, there is very little result in terms of military success and a very large promise that if a larger regional conflict were to start, Saudi Arabia would be very decisively on the losing side of it.

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Feature photo | A child injured in a deadly Saudi-led coalition airstrike rests in a hospital in Saada, Yemen, Aug. 12, 2018. Hani Mohammed | AP

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